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News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.fao.org

The seven countries of Central America approached the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture in 2001 for help in reducing fruit fly prevalence in their region. This was important for the export of fresh agricultural product exports. Pilot projects developed as teaching tools for Central American farmers proved so successful that, instead of being used only as demonstrations, they became a critical part of exportimport agreements. A major importing country accepted the results of the demonstrations as validation that the project areas had low pest prevalence, and proof that these areas could be used as part of a systems approach to meeting phytosanitary import requirements. Traditionally, Central American countries mainly produced crops such as coffee, banana and sugarcane – crops not affected by the Mediterranean or other types of fruit fly pests. Thus growers never had to meet the strict export phytosanitary standards required for many high-value tropical crops that are fruit fly hosts. However, since the 1990s, growers have dealt with the frustration of fluctuating international markets and increasingly lower prices for their traditional commodities. In response, they diversified their production to grow more high-value horticultural commodities such as tomatoes, bell peppers and papaya for export. This created a new problem. These crops are hosts for fruit flies, meaning that the growers needed to meet standards for exporting to countries free of such pests. These importing countries simply would not accept fresh produce without proof that fruit flies would not accompany the shipments. This meant that investment in these new crops would remain very restricted, as long as this phytosanitary problem could not be overcome. Fruit fly control succeeds with complete technical package The Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture knew, from experience with other fruit fly eradication and containment projects in the region, that success would require more than just releasing sterile fruit flies. Such a regional project would require coordination, with Central America taking a holistic approach to problem solving and establishing complementary phytosanitary policies in the region. The Joint FAO/ IAEA Division proposed an initiative that focused on an integration of pest-management methods in an area-wide approach, including use of the sterile insect technique (SIT) where necessary. Pilot areas of low pest-prevalence would be created, as the basis to further develop a specific system approach for each product. The initiative also called for cooperation among governments, fruit growers, fruit exporters and international organizations in Central America. The project, launched in 2001 with the support of the Joint FAO/ IAEA Division, offered a complete technical package. Growers first learned to measure the size of the fruit fly populations in their fields and adjacent areas, and how to suppress the populations with measures other than SIT as part of an integrated pest-management approach. They also learned the steps for successful SIT application, how to monitor and measure the resulting levels of insect prevalence, how to establish database systems for proving they actually had achieved low prevalence, how to inform the World Trade Organization (WTO) and the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC) of their results, and how to negotiate export agreements with importing countries, based on systems approaches as the best option to pest risk management. The project also invited a major importer, the United States of America, to check the pilot areas in the different countries where the work was under way and to participate in outlining systems approach work plans for export. This enabled the countries to move immediately into exporting their produce, since the United States of America was able to validate the results in the pilot areas, with systems approaches becoming the basis for actual export-import agreements. FAO /IAEA pest control success leads to increased investment and employment When the project started in 2001,the Joint FAO/IAEA Division experts working on the pilots were aware that the IPPC was in the process of preparing standards for fruit fly areas of low prevalence and fruit fly systems approaches. They anticipated that the phytosanitary rules might change in the middle of the project and prepared for this possible outcome. So in 2008, when the IPPC issued a standard allowing “low-pest prevalence for fruit flies”, the Central America project already had been working in that direction for several years. When the pilot project ended in 2007, the Joint Division enhanced its activities in two or three locations per country, aiming towards establishing low-prevalence areas and to further developing systems approaches. As a result, countries set up export-import arrangements while private sector entrepreneurs invested in tropical fruit and vegetable production, expanded growing areas and hired more rural workers. In most cases, 80 percent of the workers are women who work in processing, packing and quality control, and 20 percent are men who work in the field. Now, other support industries are springing up, such as fresh fruit and vegetable packing and transport companies, ensuring local growers can meet increased export demands that have resulted from meeting the low pest-prevalence and systems approaches standards. Sterile insect technique (SIT) SIT calls for rearing enormous numbers of male insects and sterilizing them in ionizing radiation chambers, then releasing them into target areas. They mate with wild fertile females but produce no offspring. This method has been used with great success since the 1970s as an environmentally friendly, chemical-free method for controlling populations of insect pests.


News Article | December 5, 2016
Site: www.newsmaker.com.au

According to Stratistics MRC, the Global Farm Equipment Market is valued at $158.92 billion in 2015 and is expected to grow at a CAGR of 9.6% to reach $301.97 billion by 2022. In the present scenario the demand and supply ratios for the food market is not up to the mark and is witnessing a huge deficit across the globe, these factors are demanding the need for food supply. Population growth and need for the mechanization of the farming are the factors favoring the market growth. However, factors such as increasing subsidies provided by government to purchase farm equipment and support farming practices for improved quality crops inhibit the market growth. Farm tractors segment is anticipated to be the largest market segment due to the growing demand. Planting equipment and harvesting equipment segments are likely to be the emerging market owing to the presence of large cultivation areas and less manpower. However, Asia Pacific is estimated to be the fastest growing region due to the presence of world’s largest food supplier economies, i.e China and India. Some of the key players in farm equipment market include AGCO Corporation, Alamo Group, Inc., Bucher Industries AG, Caterpillar Incorporated, CLAAS KGaA mbH, CNH Global N.V, Deere & Company, Escorts Limited, Fiat Industrial SpA, Groupe Exel Industries, Iseki & Co., Ltd, J.C. Bamford Excavators Limited (JCB), Kubota Corporation, Mahindra & Mahindra Limited and Yamabiko Corporation. Types Covered: • Fertilizing and Plant protection Equipment  • Irrigation Equipment  o Drip Irrigation Equipment o Sprinkler Irrigation Equipment • Planting Equipment  • Tillage Equipment  o Power Tiller o Rotavator o Zero Till Seed Drill • Tractors  • Harvesting Equipment  o Combine Harvesters o Threshers o Other Harvesting Equipments • Crop processing Equipment  • Hay and Forage Equipment  • Other Types  o Laser Land Leveler o Multi Crop Planter o Power Spray o Power Weeder o Rice Transplanter o Self-Propelled Vertical Conveyer Reaper    Processes Covered: • Harvesting & Threshing • Land Development, Tillage, Seed Bed Preparation • Plant Protection • Post-Harvest & Agro Processing • Sowing & Planting • Weed Inter Cultivation    Regions Covered: • North America o US o Canada o Mexico • Europe o Germany o France o Italy o UK  o Spain      o Rest of Europe  • Asia Pacific o Japan        o China        o India        o Australia        o New Zealand       o Rest of Asia Pacific       • Rest of the World o Middle East o Brazil o Argentina o South Africa o Egypt What our report offers: - Market share assessments for the regional and country level segments - Market share analysis of the top industry players - Strategic recommendations for the new entrants - Market forecasts for a minimum of 7 years of all the mentioned segments, sub segments and the regional markets - Market Trends (Drivers, Constraints, Opportunities, Threats, Challenges, Investment Opportunities, and recommendations) - Strategic recommendations in key business segments based on the market estimations - Competitive landscaping mapping the key common trends - Company profiling with detailed strategies, financials, and recent developments - Supply chain trends mapping the latest technological advancements


PANACA, Nev., Nov. 17, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- U.S. Rare Earth Minerals, Inc., (PINK:USMN) announced today that Research will be Conducted by King Faisal University on EXCELERITE®.   Donita R. Kendig, CFO of USMN stated, “Ben Benzinge, Master Distributor for U.S. Rare Earth Minerals, Inc., met Dr. Sherif Elegainey of King Faisal University at the 2016 Saudi Arabia Agro Exhibition and introduced him to the many applications of EXCELERITE®. Dr. Khalid Alhudaib, his colleague and the Head of the Plant Protection Department, performed an analysis on the sample provided him. Dr. Alhudaib has now informed us he has arranged for the agricultural and veterinary training station to test EXCELERITE® on fish, poultry, cucumber and goats. They will also test EXCELERITE® on diseased Date Palm and Palm Oil trees based on the reported rejuvenation of trees treated with EXCELERITE® in Colombia. More about Professor Alhudaib at www.dralhudaib.com. About King Faisal University King Faisal University has a total enrollment of 16,945 and a staff of 2,107.  It is a comprehensive university consisting of multiple colleges and research centers, including the Deanship of Graduate Studies and Deanship of Academic Research, established in 1984 and 2000 respectively. These departments have enabled the university to offer a number of postgraduate programs and facilitate academic research in most colleges. In addition to sponsoring scientific research, the university has made numerous contributions to the local community and has addressed environmental concerns. In order to expand its reach into society, the university established twelve scientific research centers, including the Date Palms Research Center, Water Research Center, Camel Research Center, Veterinary Research & Animal Husbandry Center, Islamic Architecture & Solar Energy Unit, and Prince Muhammad Bin Fahad Bin Abdulaziz Medical Research Center. U.S. Rare Earth Minerals, Inc. U.S. Rare Earth Minerals, Inc. (USMN) is engaged in the sales and distribution of products derived from the Company’s mining activities in Nevada relating to certain natural mineral deposits and other natural rare earth minerals.  Products of USMN consist of natural minerals for animal consumption as well as agricultural products sold under the brand name EXCELERITE®. USMN is headquartered in Reno. The company maintains a web site at: www.us-rem.com. This press release contains statements that may constitute "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the Securities Act of 1933 and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Those statements include statements regarding the intent, belief or current expectations of U.S. Rare Earth Minerals, Inc., and members of management as well as the assumptions on which such statements are based. Prospective investors are cautioned that any such forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and involve risks and uncertainties, and actual results may differ materially from those contemplated by such forward-looking statements. The company undertakes no obligation to update or revise forward-looking statements to reflect changed assumptions, the occurrence of unanticipated events or changes to future operating results.


News Article | April 21, 2016
Site: www.technologyreview.com

The debate over genetically modified foods is about to get a lot more heated in Washington, D.C. DuPont Pioneer’s new waxy corn hybrid and a Penn State plant scientist’s “anti-browning” white button mushroom are the latest additions to a fast-growing pile of new genetically engineered crops that have so far avoided any government regulation. New gene-editing techniques like CRISPR are making this possible, and they are underscoring the fact that the regulatory system hasn’t kept up with the breakneck pace of biotechnological innovation. It’s not for lack of trying. Last summer, the White House called on the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Food and Drug Administration to “modernize” the federal system for regulating “products of biotechnology,” including crops. In line with that, in February the USDA informed the public of its intent to change its system for regulating genetically engineered organisms. The USDA does the bulk of the regulating when it comes to genetically engineered crops, under a law called the Plant Protection Act, to protect other crops and the environment from “plant pests.” Specifically, the agency regulates a crop if it has been genetically engineered using a plant pest, meaning that the donor, the recipient, or the vector for delivering the new gene qualifies as a plant pest. That made a lot more sense for the previous generation of genetically engineered crops, commonly called GMOs. Most were made using a soil bacterium to deliver a new gene, were modified with a gene taken from a bacterium, or both. That triggered the “plant pest” regulatory mechanism. Newer techniques like CRISPR can modify the genome without inserting a new gene and don't rely on plant pests, so they don’t trigger that mechanism.​ So far, the agency has determined that more than 30 genetically engineered crops are not subject to its regulations. The fact that genetically engineered crops are escaping regulation only because they don't meet the legal definition of a plant pest means the system is not working, says Gregory Jaffe, director of biotechnology for the Center for Science in the Public Interest. “It’s not a science-based determination.” Just how the USDA’s system might change is hard to predict. In February, the agency proposed several hypothetical approaches, which ranged from doing nothing to substantially increasing the USDA’s ability to review and regulate genetically engineered crops. In the near future the agency will review public comments on those proposals. It will also consider the results of a newly launched study by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The scientists, policy experts, and industry representatives in the study group are tasked with helping the USDA, FDA, and EPA prepare for the future by describing the scientific and technological advances likely to emerge in the next five to 10 years. They are also charged with determining whether future genetically engineered organisms could pose “different types of risks to existing products and organisms.” Bernice Slutsky, senior vice president of domestic and international policy at the American Seed Trade Association, says regulators should be careful not to use the term “gene editing” too loosely. These techniques can be used in many different ways, and lumping the applications together “doesn’t provide enough nuance in terms of the ultimate product,” she argues, which could lead to unnecessary overregulation. For example, CRISPR gives developers the ability to make very small, precise edits to the genome, such as the deletion of a single gene. In many cases the outcome is no different from one achieved using traditional techniques that rely on chemicals or radiation to induce mutations, says Slutsky. Crops developed that way are not regulated. “If you can get to the same product end point through traditional breeding as you can through a gene-editing method, why would you treat them differently from a regulatory perspective?” But it could take years to finalize new regulations, and the uncertainty could stifle innovation. “A lot of developers are holding back until they know what the rules are,” says Slutsky. In the meantime, it’s likely that the gene-edited crops that are developed will continue to earn unregulated status—and some may even find their way to grocery stores.


News Article | November 15, 2016
Site: www.newsmaker.com.au

This report studies Garden Sprayers in Global Market, especially in North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia and India, with production, revenue, consumption, import and export in these regions, from 2011 to 2015, and forecast to 2021. This report focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with production, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer, covering  Micron Group  Hudson  Solo  Get Bats Out  MARUYAMA  Orbo  The Fountainhead Group  Maax  Hymatic  Dal Degan  Jacto Inc.  Demco  Chapin International, Inc  Shindaiwa  Shandong Wish Plant Protection Machinery Co., Ltd. By types, the market can be split into  By Type (Hose-end, Tank, Backpack, Trolley Sprayer?)  By Feature(Battery Sprayer, Hand Rotary, Power Sprayers)  Type III By Application, the market can be split into  Agricultural  Forest  Animal Husbandry By Regions, this report covers (we can add the regions/countries as you want)  North America  China  Europe  Southeast Asia  Japan  India Global Garden Sprayers Market Professional Survey Report 2016  1 Industry Overview of Garden Sprayers  1.1 Definition and Specifications of Garden Sprayers  1.1.1 Definition of Garden Sprayers  1.1.2 Specifications of Garden Sprayers  1.2 Classification of Garden Sprayers  1.2.1 By Type (Hose-end, Tank, Backpack, Trolley Sprayer?)  1.2.2 By Feature(Battery Sprayer, Hand Rotary, Power Sprayers)  1.2.3 Type III  1.3 Applications of Garden Sprayers  1.3.1 Agricultural  1.3.2 Forest  1.3.3 Animal Husbandry  1.4 Market Segment by Regions  1.4.1 North America  1.4.2 China  1.4.3 Europe  1.4.4 Southeast Asia  1.4.5 Japan  1.4.6 India 2 Manufacturing Cost Structure Analysis of Garden Sprayers  2.1 Raw Material and Suppliers  2.2 Manufacturing Cost Structure Analysis of Garden Sprayers  2.3 Manufacturing Process Analysis of Garden Sprayers  2.4 Industry Chain Structure of Garden Sprayers 3 Technical Data and Manufacturing Plants Analysis of Garden Sprayers  3.1 Capacity and Commercial Production Date of Global Garden Sprayers Major Manufacturers in 2015  3.2 Manufacturing Plants Distribution of Global Garden Sprayers Major Manufacturers in 2015  3.3 R&D Status and Technology Source of Global Garden Sprayers Major Manufacturers in 2015  3.4 Raw Materials Sources Analysis of Global Garden Sprayers Major Manufacturers in 2015 4 Global Garden Sprayers Overall Market Overview  4.1 2011-2016E Overall Market Analysis  4.2 Capacity Analysis  4.2.1 2011-2016E Global Garden Sprayers Capacity and Growth Rate Analysis  4.2.2 2015 Garden Sprayers Capacity Analysis (Company Segment)  4.3 Sales Analysis  4.3.1 2011-2016E Global Garden Sprayers Sales and Growth Rate Analysis  4.3.2 2015 Garden Sprayers Sales Analysis (Company Segment)  4.4 Sales Price Analysis  4.4.1 2011-2016E Global Garden Sprayers Sales Price  4.4.2 2015 Garden Sprayers Sales Price Analysis (Company Segment) For more information or any query mail at [email protected]


Ripka G.,Plant Protection | Szabo A.,Corvinus University of Budapest
Acta Phytopathologica et Entomologica Hungarica | Year: 2011

Authors made regular mite collectings between 1990 and 2010 on ornamental trees and shrubs, on streets, parks, in city greenery, forests, botanical gardens and private gardens, in various localities of Hungary. Belonging to 6 families, 16 species are reported. New mesostigmatid, prostigmatid and astigmatid mite records and hosts records are presented.


Ripka G.,Plant Protection
Acta Phytopathologica et Entomologica Hungarica | Year: 2011

Partial results of 19 years of mite collecting on ornamental trees and shrubs, on streets, in parks, in greenery, in botanical gardens and private gardens, in various localities of Hungary are included here. During this survey a new genus, Adventacarus n. gen. and two new species were collected: Adventacarus turulae n. sp. and Abacarus kôrösicsomai n. sp. are described and illustrated from Phyllostachys viridiglaucescens. Both species appeared to be vagrant without causing apparent injuries to the host. The importance of gnathosomal chaetotaxy in the systematics of the eriophyoid mites is emphasized. A new tribe, Adventacarini n. tr. is proposed.


Lagzian A.,Plant Protection | Saberi Riseh R.,Plant Protection | Khodaygan P.,Plant Protection | Sedaghati E.,Plant Protection | Dashti H.,Agronomy and Plant Breeding
Archives of Phytopathology and Plant Protection | Year: 2013

About 900 bacterial strains obtained from plants rhizosphere from different areas of Iran and biocontrol ability were widely survey in vitro and greenhouse conditions against Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici the causal agent of take-all disease. Finally the best strain (VUPf5 strain) in the additional tests biocontrol ability in vitro and greenhouse conditions was selected for next studies. VUPf5 suppressed of take-all disease 85%. Based on biochemical and morphological tests, this isolate is belonging to the species Pseudomonas fluorescens. This isolate significantly produced the secondary metabolites such as siderophores, hydrogen cyanide, protease, phenazine and volatile metabolites. © 2013 Taylor & Francis.


Author made regular mite collectings between 1990 and 2010 on ornamental trees and shrubs, on streets, parks, in city greenery, forests, botanical gardens and private gardens, in various localities of Hungary. During this survey a new Quercus-infesting eriophyoid mite species was collected: Brevulacus carpathicus n. sp. is described and illustrated from Quercus petraea. Rhyncaphytoptus cerrifoliae Farkas is redescribed from Quercus cerris. Both species produce wax and are vagrant on the leaf undersurface. Two other species, viz. Aceria cichorii Petanović, Boczek et Shi and Cecidophyes tristernalis (Nalepa) are new species for the fauna of Hungary. Some faunistic data on the known taxa from this country are included.


Salama H.S.,Plant Protection | Abd-Elgawad M.M.M.,National Research Center of Egypt
Archives of Phytopathology and Plant Protection | Year: 2010

The distribution and abundance of red palm weevil (Rhynchophorus ferrugineus) within palm tree-infected stems at Ismaelia governorate, Egypt, were investigated. Taylor's power law was fit (P ≤ 0.01) to its larvae, pupae and/or adults. The slope value of this power law indicated the clumped distribution of these insect stages. Sample size optimisation needed to achieve a predetermined level of sampling error for the insect stages was calculated. Also, soil samples were taken after uniform application of entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis bacteriophora strain EG1 to the soil under citrus tree canopies at the rate of 104 infective juveniles/400 cm2 plots, and assayed for the nematode using the Galleria bait method. At the first and second sampling dates, the nematode displayed contagious distribution and attained mean insect mortality of 15.3 and 4, respectively. At the third date of sampling, the nematode showed random distribution according to chi-squared test and caused 1.8 mean insect mortality. Evaluation of H. bacteriophora EG1 as a biocontrol measure for the weevil was discussed based on their investigated dispersion indices. © 2010 Taylor & Francis.

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