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Pincemail J.,University of Liege | Kevers C.,Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Unit | Kevers C.,Plant Biology Institute | Tabart J.,Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Unit | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Food Science | Year: 2012

Strawberries are a good source of micronutrients, especially antioxidant phenolics. More information is needed to better exploit the health-promoting effect of such fruits. Several studies focused on the effects of genotype, cultural practices, and seasonal variation on the antioxidant potential of strawberries, but often yielding contradictory results and/or focusing on only 1 source of variability. In the present study, we showed that total phenolic compounds, ascorbic acid, and antioxidant capacity strongly differed between genotypes of strawberry. The precise results revealed the importance of genetic background for the antioxidant capacity and for the content of total phenolics (with up to 3.3-fold variations). Other parameters may also influence the antioxidant capacity in strawberry such as harvest time, culture conditions, and environmental factors. Moreover, in this study, the harvesting time (at the same ripening stage) appeared to be very important, more important than genotype. Variations of the antioxidant capacity of up to 4.1-folds were observed following the harvesting time of "Elsanta" cultivar. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists ®. Source


Kevers C.,Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Unit | Kevers C.,Plant Biology Institute | Pincemail J.,University of Liege | Tabart J.,Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Unit | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry | Year: 2011

Apple and pear fruits are important sources of secondary plant metabolites and one of the major sources of dietary phenolics consumed all year round. The aim of this work was to identify the main variables influencing phenolic content and antioxidant capacity in apples. Higher phenolic and antioxidant contents were observed in some varieties (such as the Delbar Estival apple and Durondeau pear). Storage conditions were important. Our results also showed that fruits should be consumed rapidly after purchase and with their peel. After one week of domestic storage, the ascorbic acid content was found to decrease by 75%. Peeling led to a more than 25% decrease in total phenolics and ascorbic acid. The harvest time (at normal ripeness) had only a limited impact, but significant year-to-year variations were observed. In conclusion, well-chosen and well-stored apples and pears may contribute to an antioxidant-rich diet if consumed rapidly and with their peel. © 2011 American Chemical Society. Source

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