Plant Biology Unit

Udine, Italy

Plant Biology Unit

Udine, Italy
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Misson G.,Environmental and Life science | Misson G.,University of Udine | Macor A.,University of Udine | Boscutti F.,Regional Environmental Protection Agency ARPA of Friuli Venezia Giulia | Casolo V.,Plant Biology Unit
Phyton - Annales Rei Botanicae | Year: 2016

Six populations of Hippuris vulgaris L. localised in the spring rivers of Friuli Venezia Giulia (Italy) low-flood plain have been chosen for a synecological study aiming to understand the relationships between aquatic vegetation, chemical-physical parameters (of sediment and water) and human disturbance. Results revealed that, in spring water environments, H. vulgaris grows in dense populations favoured by low stream flow and its distribution and abundance is mainly influenced by water parameters such as temperature, conductivity and oxygen saturation.


Filippi A.,Plant Biology Unit | Petrussa E.,Plant Biology Unit | Peresson C.,Plant Biology Unit | Bertolini A.,Plant Biology Unit | And 2 more authors.
FEBS Open Bio | Year: 2015

Flavonoids represent one of the most important molecules of plant secondary metabolism, playing many different biochemical and physiological roles. Although their essential role in plant life and human health has been elucidated by many studies, their subcellular transport and accumulation in plant tissues remains unclear. This is due to the absence of a convenient and simple method to monitor their transport. In the present work, we suggest an assay able to follow in vivo transport of quercetin, the most abundant flavonoid in plant tissues. This uptake was monitored using 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (DPBA), a fluorescent probe, in non-pigmented Vitis vinifera cell cultures. © 2015 The Authors.


PubMed | Plant Biology Unit
Type: | Journal: FEBS open bio | Year: 2015

Flavonoids represent one of the most important molecules of plant secondary metabolism, playing many different biochemical and physiological roles. Although their essential role in plant life and human health has been elucidated by many studies, their subcellular transport and accumulation in plant tissues remains unclear. This is due to the absence of a convenient and simple method to monitor their transport. In the present work, we suggest an assay able to follow in vivo transport of quercetin, the most abundant flavonoid in plant tissues. This uptake was monitored using 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (DPBA), a fluorescent probe, in non-pigmented Vitis vinifera cell cultures.

Loading Plant Biology Unit collaborators
Loading Plant Biology Unit collaborators