PLA General Hospital and Military Medical Postgraduate College

Beijing, China

PLA General Hospital and Military Medical Postgraduate College

Beijing, China
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Wang N.,PLA General Hospital and Military Medical Postgraduate College | Wang N.,Nankai University | Li Q.,PLA General Hospital and Military Medical Postgraduate College | Zhang L.,PLA General Hospital and Military Medical Postgraduate College | And 12 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2012

Background: Mesothelial cell injury plays an important role in peritoneal fibrosis. Present clinical therapies aimed at alleviating peritoneal fibrosis have been largely inadequate. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are efficient for repairing injuries and reducing fibrosis. This study was designed to investigate the effects of MSCs on injured mesothelial cells and peritoneal fibrosis. Methodology/Principal Findings: Rat bone marrow-derived MSCs (5 ×10 6) were injected into Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats via tail vein 24 h after peritoneal scraping. Distinct reductions in adhesion formation; infiltration of neutrophils, macrophage cells; number of fibroblasts; and level of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 were found in MSCs-treated rats. The proliferation and repair of peritoneal mesothelial cells in MSCs-treated rats were stimulated. Mechanically injured mesothelial cells co-cultured with MSCs in transwells showed distinct increases in migration and proliferation. In vivo imaging showed that MSCs injected intravenously mainly accumulated in the lungs which persisted for at least seven days. No apparent MSCs were observed in the injured peritoneum even when MSCs were injected intraperitoneally. The injection of serum-starved MSCs-conditioned medium (CM) intravenously reduced adhesions similar to MSCs. Antibody based protein array of MSCs-CM showed that the releasing of TNFα-stimulating gene (TSG)-6 increased most dramatically. Promotion of mesothelial cell repair and reduction of peritoneal adhesion were produced by the administration of recombinant mouse (rm) TSG-6, and were weakened by TSG-6-RNA interfering. Conclusions/Significance: Collectively, these results indicate that MSCs may attenuate peritoneal injury by repairing mesothelial cells, reducing inflammation and fibrosis. Rather than the engraftment, the secretion of TSG-6 by MSCs makes a major contribution to the therapeutic benefits of MSCs. © 2012 Wang et al.


Wu L.,PLA General Hospital and Military Medical Postgraduate College | Wu L.,Nankai University | Feng Z.,PLA General Hospital and Military Medical Postgraduate College | Cui S.,PLA General Hospital and Military Medical Postgraduate College | And 8 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2013

The podocyte functions as a glomerular filtration barrier. Autophagy of postmitotic cells is an important protective mechanism that is essential for maintaining the homeostasis of podocytes. Exploring an in vivo rat model of passive Heymann nephritis and an in vitro model of puromycin amino nucleotide (PAN)-cultured podocytes, we examined the specific mechanisms underlying changing autophagy levels and podocyte injury. In the passive Heymann nephritis model rats, the mammalian target-of-rapamycin (mTOR) levels were upregulated in injured podocytes while autophagy was inhibited. In PAN-treated podocytes, mTOR lowered the level of autophagy through the mTOR-ULK1 pathway resulting in damaged podocytes. Rapamycin treatment of these cells reduced podocyte injury by raising the levels of autophagy. These in vivo and in vitro experiments demonstrate that podocyte injury is associated with changes in autophagy levels, and that rapamycin can reduce podocyte injury by increasing autophagy levels via inhibition of the mTOR-ULK1 pathway. These results provide an important theoretical basis for future treatment of diseases involving podocyte injury. © 2013 Wu et al.


PubMed | PLA General Hospital and Military Medical Postgraduate College
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2012

Mesothelial cell injury plays an important role in peritoneal fibrosis. Present clinical therapies aimed at alleviating peritoneal fibrosis have been largely inadequate. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are efficient for repairing injuries and reducing fibrosis. This study was designed to investigate the effects of MSCs on injured mesothelial cells and peritoneal fibrosis.Rat bone marrow-derived MSCs (5 10(6)) were injected into Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats via tail vein 24 h after peritoneal scraping. Distinct reductions in adhesion formation; infiltration of neutrophils, macrophage cells; number of fibroblasts; and level of transforming growth factor (TGF)-1 were found in MSCs-treated rats. The proliferation and repair of peritoneal mesothelial cells in MSCs-treated rats were stimulated. Mechanically injured mesothelial cells co-cultured with MSCs in transwells showed distinct increases in migration and proliferation. In vivo imaging showed that MSCs injected intravenously mainly accumulated in the lungs which persisted for at least seven days. No apparent MSCs were observed in the injured peritoneum even when MSCs were injected intraperitoneally. The injection of serum-starved MSCs-conditioned medium (CM) intravenously reduced adhesions similar to MSCs. Antibody based protein array of MSCs-CM showed that the releasing of TNF-stimulating gene (TSG)-6 increased most dramatically. Promotion of mesothelial cell repair and reduction of peritoneal adhesion were produced by the administration of recombinant mouse (rm) TSG-6, and were weakened by TSG-6-RNA interfering.Collectively, these results indicate that MSCs may attenuate peritoneal injury by repairing mesothelial cells, reducing inflammation and fibrosis. Rather than the engraftment, the secretion of TSG-6 by MSCs makes a major contribution to the therapeutic benefits of MSCs.

Loading PLA General Hospital and Military Medical Postgraduate College collaborators
Loading PLA General Hospital and Military Medical Postgraduate College collaborators