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Le Touquet – Paris-Plage, France

Lenoir L.,Insudiet | Maillot M.,MS Nutrition | Guilbot A.,Pileje | Ritz P.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research
Obesity | Year: 2015

Objective To evaluate the rate of weight loss maintenance, defined as a 10% loss of initial weight maintained beyond 1 year, among patients with BMI > 25 kg/m2 who had been managed by primary care physicians practicing behavioral nutrition (moderately high-protein diet, carbohydrate restriction, and behavioral therapy). Methods Restrospective analysis of anthropometric characteristics, weight loss, and its determinants was conducted in 14,256 patients. Results 26.7% of subjects met the success criterion (successful maintenance group; SM), 25.7% did not maintain their weight loss (unsuccessful maintenance group; UM), and 47.6% did not lose 10% of their initial weight (failure group; F). At inclusion, patients in the SM group had a greater BMI and fat mass percentage (40.5% in SM, 38.5% in UM, and 37.0% in F). These patients lost more weight (-14.1% vs. -4.59%) and fat mass (-24.7% vs. -8.21%) than patients in the UM group, and contribution of adiposity to their weight loss was 75.1%. Follow-up of patients in the SM group was characterized by a greater frequency of consultations. Conclusions Management by primary care providers with behavioral nutrition facilitates weight loss maintenance in patients with overweight and obesity. The determinants of success are frequency of consultations, initial BMI, and initial weight loss. © 2015 The Obesity Society.


Trademark
Pileje | Date: 2002-08-13

Pharmaceutical and veterinary preparations for the treatment of diarrhea, intestinal functional disorders, constipation, digestive disorders; dietetic substances adapted for medical use, namely, probiotic or prebiotic milk ferments for medical use; dietary supplements; food supplements not for medical purposes and for human consumption only, namely, prebiotic or probiotic milk ferments and nutritional supplements for medical purposes, namely, probiotic or prebiotic milk ferments; non-nutritive edible plant fibers for use as a laxative; mineral supplements with trace elements for humans and animal feed containing trace elements; vitamins; food for babies; plasters for medical purposes. [ Preserved, dried and cooked fruits and vegetables; jellies, jams, fruit sauces; eggs, edible oils and fats; preserves with a meat, fish, poultry or game base; milk and milk products, excluding ice cream, ice milk and frozen yogurt; milk ferment not for pharmaceutical purposes and for human consumption only ]. [ tea, cocoa, sugar; rice, tapioca, sago; cereal-based snack food, bread; flavored ices; honey, treacle; yeast, baking-powder, salt, mustard, vinegar, condiment sauces, salad dressings, spices, ice ].


Trademark
Pileje | Date: 2007-05-01

Pharmaceutical, veterinary preparations for medical use and for the treatment of diarrhea, intestinal functional disorders, constipation, digestive disorders; sanitary products for medical use and for personal hygiene, namely, sanitary napkins, sanitary pads; food supplements for medical use; dietetic substances for medical use, namely, dietetic foods for medical use; food for infants; milk ferments for pharmaceutical purposes, namely, powdered milk for babies; medical or sanitary disinfectants for medical instruments, pesticides; fungicides, herbicides for home, garden and lawn use and for professional use. Meat, fish, poultry and game; meat extracts, preserved, dried and cooked fruits and vegetables; jellies, jams; eggs, milk and milk products excluding ice cream, ice milk and frozen yogurt; lactic starters not for pharmaceutical purposes and for human consumption only, namely, lactic acid drinks and lactic acid bacteria drinks; edible oils and fats; food supplements for non-medical purposes and for human consumption only, namely pre-biological or probiotic lactic starters, namely, lactic acid drinks and lactic acid bacteria drinks. Coffee, tea, cocoa, sugar, rice, tapioca, sago, coffee substitutes; flour and preparations made from cereals, namely, breakfast cereals, bread, pastry and confectionery, namely, crystal sugar pieces, confectionery chips for baking; edible fruit ice; honey, molasses, yeast, baking powder; salt, mustard, vinegar, sauces, spices, cooling ice, namely, ice cubes, ice blocks; salad dressings.


Holowacz S.,Pileje | Guigne C.,University Paul Sabatier | Chene G.,University Paul Sabatier | Mouysset S.,Toulouse 1 University Capitole | And 3 more authors.
PharmaNutrition | Year: 2015

A multispecies Lactobacillus- and Bifidobacterium-containing probiotic mixture significantly reduced the adverse metabolic and inflammatory effects of a 14-week high-fat diet in wild-type C57/BL6J mice gavaged 5 days a week with the probiotic mixture or vehicle. Recent evidence indicates that the gut microbiome may play a decisive role in the onset of obesity and associated chronic metabolic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, by modulating nutrient absorption and factors conducive to development of a persistent low-grade inflammatory state. By modifying the gut microbiome, probiotics might constitute an effective dietary strategy for managing these metabolic disorders. The tested probiotic mixture significantly attenuated the increase in body weight, serum glucose concentration and insulin resistance induced by the high-fat diet. Furthermore, it significantly reduced the up-regulation of expression of several genes encoding pro-inflammatory adipokines and leukotriene pathway enzymes (CCL-2, IL-6 and leukotriene C4 synthase in adipose tissue, leukotriene C4 synthase and leukotriene A4 hydrolase in the gut). It also significantly counteracted the down-regulation of adipose tissue gene expression related to the anti-inflammatory adipokine adiponectin in mice fed the high-fat diet. These results suggest that the mechanism underlying the beneficial metabolic effects of the probiotic mixture might involve inhibition of gut and adipose tissue inflammation. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.


Borel P.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | Borel P.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Borel P.,Aix - Marseille University | De Edelenyi F.S.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | And 12 more authors.
Annals of Medicine | Year: 2011

Lutein is recovered at high concentration in the human macula lutea. Recent studies suggest that this micronutrient might be implicated in prevention of age-related macular degeneration. Objective. To identify genes which affect blood and retina lutein concentrations among candidate genes (intestinal sterol transporters and carotenoid oxygenases). Design. A comparative plus an observational study. Participants. Twenty-nine healthy subjects for the comparative study and 622 subjects for the observational study. Intervention and methods. All the participants were genotyped for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the candidate genes. Fasting plasma lutein concentrations were measured in all the participants and after 6 months' supplementation, with either a lutein-rich supplement or a placebo, in the 29 subjects who participated in the comparative study. Macular pigment optical density (MPOD), which is a measure of macula concentration of lutein, was measured before and after the dietary intervention in the 29 subjects. Associations between SNPs and plasma lutein and MPOD were assessed by partial least square (PLS) regression followed by univariate analysis. Observed associations between SNPs and plasma lutein were verified by haplotype-based association analysis in the cohort of 622 subjects. Main outcome measures. Plasma lutein levels and MPOD. Results. Six SNPs in four genes (ABCG8, BCMO1, CD36, and NPC1L1) explained 25% and 38% of the plasma and MPOD variance, respectively. Subjects with TT at the BCMO1 rs7501331 locus had lower (P < 0.05) plasma lutein than CT subjects. Subjects with CC at the CD36 rs13230419 locus had lower (P < 0.05) plasma lutein than subjects who carried a T allele. The association between CD36 and plasma lutein was confirmed in the cohort of 622 subjects. Subjects with TT at the BCMO1 rs7501331 locus had a higher (P < 0.05) MPOD, and subjects with GG at rs1761667 CD36 locus had a higher (P < 0.05) MPOD than those with an A allele. Conclusions. These results suggest that BCMO1 and CD36 are implicated in plasma and retina concentrations of lutein and that genetic variants in these genes can modulate blood and retina concentrations of lutein. © 2011 Informa UK, Ltd.

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