Piedmont Cancer Registry CPO

Sant'Ambrogio di Torino, Italy

Piedmont Cancer Registry CPO

Sant'Ambrogio di Torino, Italy
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Nagel G.,University of Ulm | Linseisen J.,German Cancer Research Center | Van Gils C.H.,University Utrecht | Peeters P.H.,University Utrecht | And 47 more authors.
Breast Cancer Research and Treatment | Year: 2010

So far, studies on dietary antioxidant intake, including β-carotene, vitamin C and vitamin E, and breast cancer risk are inconclusive. Thus, we addressed this question in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. During a median follow-up time of 8.8 years, 7,502 primary invasive breast cancer cases were identified. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). All analyses were run stratified by menopausal status at recruitment and, additionally, by smoking status, alcohol intake, use of exogenous hormones and use of dietary supplements. In the multivariate analyses, dietary intake of β-carotene, vitamin C and E was not associated with breast cancer risk in premenopausal [highest vs. lowest quintile: HR, 1.04 (95% CI, 0.85-1.27), 1.12 (0.92-1.36) and 1.11 (0.84-1.46), respectively] and postmenopausal women [0.93 (0.82-1.04), 0.98 (0.87-1.11) and 0.92 (0.77-1.11), respectively]. However, in postmenopausal women using exogenous hormones, high intake of β-carotene [highest vs. lowest quintile; HR 0.79 (95% CI, 0.66-0.96), P trend 0.06] and vitamin C [0.88 (0.72-1.07), P trend 0.05] was associated with reduced breast cancer risk. In addition, dietary β-carotene was associated with a decreased risk in postmenopausal women with high alcohol intake. Overall, dietary intake of β-carotene, vitamin C and E was not related to breast cancer risk in neither pre- nor postmenopausal women. However, in subgroups of postmenopausal women, a weak protective effect between β-carotene and vitamin E from food and breast cancer risk cannot be excluded. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


Andersson K.,Lund University | Bray F.,Cancer Registry of Norway | Arbyn M.,Scientific Institute of Public Health | Storm H.,Danish Cancer Society | And 5 more authors.
Acta Oncologica | Year: 2010

Background. The availability of quality assured, population-based cancer registries and biobanks with high quality samples makes it possible to conduct research on large samples sets with long follow-up within a reasonable time frame. Defined quality for both cancer registries and biobanks is essential for enabling high quality biobank-based research. Recent networking projects have brought these infrastructures together to promote the combined use of cancer registries and biobanks in cancer research. Materials and methods. In this report we review the current status and future perspectives of cancer registries and biobanks and how the interface between them should be developed to optimally further cancer research. Results and discussion. Major conclusions for future improvements are that the research exploiting cancer registries and biobanks, and the research that is building and optimising the infrastructure, should evolve together for maximally relevant progress. Population-based and sustainable biobanks that continuously and consecutively store all samples ("Biological registries") under strict quality control are needed. There is also a need for increased education, information and visibility of the interdisciplinary sciences required for optimal exploitation of these resources. © 2010 Informa Healthcare.

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