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Graham's Foundation Will Preview New Support Materials at the 21st NICU Leadership Forum The parent-focused organization has updated its NICU and Transition Home care packages with a design created by experts in cooperation with families. Phoenix, AZ, April 29, 2017 --( The NICU Leadership Forum is attended by professionals from the NICU, PICU, CVICU and other pediatric specialty areas who are looking for practical solutions for the challenges they face caring for the most vulnerable babies. Graham's Foundation president Nick Hall will be at the event to connect with leaders in the neonatology space who want to support parents of the preemies in their care but need help to do so. “While surveys our organization has conducted show that family centered care is an emerging trend in neonatology, they’ve also shown that reaching parents when they need support most can be incredibly difficult,” Hall said. “Graham’s Foundation’s primary mission is to support parents of preemies to improve outcomes for entire families. It’s a model that works because research shows that when parents receive encouragement, education and community, they’re better equipped to care for their babies.” The organization’s free care packages are designed to meet not only the practical needs of families in the NICU and those making the transition home, but also the emotional needs of moms and dads coping with the ups and downs of premature birth. They also offer a third care package option for families who are dealing with the loss of a premature infant. To learn more about Graham’s Foundation care packages for preemie parents, visit http://grahamsfoundation.org/care-packages/ About Graham's Foundation Graham’s Foundation empowers parents of premature babies through support, advocacy and research to improve outcomes for their preemies and themselves. In addition to NICU, transition home, and remembrance care package programs, we have more than 30 trained parent mentors available 24/7 and the market-leading prematurity app, MyPreemie. We connect organizations, medical professionals, and brands with preemie parent voices to impact positive change for preemies and their families. And we represent the needs of preemie parents at conferences around the world attended by neonatologists, neonatal nurses, industry, academics, and other professionals who work closely with preemies and their families. Visit http://GrahamsFoundation.org to learn more. Phoenix, AZ, April 29, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Graham’s Foundation (http://GrahamsFoundation.org), the global support organization for parents going through the journey of prematurity, has announced it will preview its newly redesigned care packages for preemie parents at a booth shared with Bionix at the 21st Annual NICU Leadership Forum in Phoenix, AZ.The NICU Leadership Forum is attended by professionals from the NICU, PICU, CVICU and other pediatric specialty areas who are looking for practical solutions for the challenges they face caring for the most vulnerable babies. Graham's Foundation president Nick Hall will be at the event to connect with leaders in the neonatology space who want to support parents of the preemies in their care but need help to do so.“While surveys our organization has conducted show that family centered care is an emerging trend in neonatology, they’ve also shown that reaching parents when they need support most can be incredibly difficult,” Hall said. “Graham’s Foundation’s primary mission is to support parents of preemies to improve outcomes for entire families. It’s a model that works because research shows that when parents receive encouragement, education and community, they’re better equipped to care for their babies.”The organization’s free care packages are designed to meet not only the practical needs of families in the NICU and those making the transition home, but also the emotional needs of moms and dads coping with the ups and downs of premature birth. They also offer a third care package option for families who are dealing with the loss of a premature infant.To learn more about Graham’s Foundation care packages for preemie parents, visit http://grahamsfoundation.org/care-packages/About Graham's FoundationGraham’s Foundation empowers parents of premature babies through support, advocacy and research to improve outcomes for their preemies and themselves. In addition to NICU, transition home, and remembrance care package programs, we have more than 30 trained parent mentors available 24/7 and the market-leading prematurity app, MyPreemie. We connect organizations, medical professionals, and brands with preemie parent voices to impact positive change for preemies and their families. And we represent the needs of preemie parents at conferences around the world attended by neonatologists, neonatal nurses, industry, academics, and other professionals who work closely with preemies and their families. Visit http://GrahamsFoundation.org to learn more. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Graham's Foundation


Dina Shacknai said, "From what I was told, I was grateful Maxie received immediate CPR from Rebecca, which is why I was so shocked to hear people saying that Rebecca had taken her life given that all reports were that Rebecca had attempted to save his life according to Maxie's father. I never imagined my son was not going to walk out of the hospital, never play soccer again, never start first grade...until he flat lined on Friday, July 15, 2011. It was at least ten hours after I learned of her death that we received Maxie's MRI results that showed he had suffered critical brain damage." Keith Greer, Esq. said, "When we filed the lawsuit we relied on information which has now been refuted. After years of investigation and evidentiary analysis by experts it has become evident that our initial theory which alleged the involvement of Dina Shacknai and Nina Romano in the tragic death of Rebecca Zahau was wrong." "Through multiple sources we have confirmed that Dina Shacknai was at Rady Children's Hospital in the PICU with her son Maxie throughout the evening of Rebecca's death and specifically at the time a neighbor heard a woman that we allege was Rebecca screaming for help.  The evidence also supports Nina Romano's statements that she was not in any way involved in Rebecca's death.  Based on this evidence we previously dismissed Nina Romano from the case and have now dismissed Dina Shacknai." "We wish to apologize to Dina, Nina and their families for the stress and trauma this process has had on their lives, particularly in light of the tremendous pain they continue to endure due to the loss of their beloved son, nephew and grandchild Maxie," said Greer. "Although Nina and I do not agree with Keith Greer's litigation theory we do agree that Max and Rebecca's deaths both need to be investigated further. It is shocking to us that this case was allowed to continue against us for almost four years, in both State and Federal Court. My sister and I have suffered in every possible way personally, professionally and our overall health and wellbeing and we still do not have answers," said Dina Shacknai. At today's press conference, the attorney for Nina Romano, Darin Wessel, Esq. said "In this case, Nina's insurance carrier made a business decision to end the financial bleeding from the cost of litigation and protect its insured, Nina Romano. Her insurance carrier, on its own, negotiated this release. Nina Romano was always firmly and adamantly against paying any money to Plaintiffs because she had nothing to do with Rebecca's death." This morning Dina highlighted the fact that she and Nina had never deviated from their commitment to not offer a single penny to the Plaintiffs to end this case against them. As counsel confirmed, the unfortunate reality is that insurance companies do not have to follow their insureds' wishes, as happened in this case with Nina. A monetary settlement of any amount was absolutely against Nina's wishes. Similarly, Keith Greer has publicly confirmed that the Plaintiffs have not been offered 'millions of dollars' to settle by anyone. Nina Romano added, "I pray that now both the Zahau family and my family can begin the process of attempting to heal our hearts from such tragic loss and try to find some level of peace while we begin the process of rebuilding our lives." This response is for Case 37-2013-00075418-CU-PO-CTL, filed July, 2013 in Superior Court of California, County of San Diego. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/overwhelming-evidence-vindicates-twin-sisters-dina-shacknai-and-nina-romano-and-proves-their-innocence-regarding-any-involvement-in-rebecca-zahaus-death-per-keith-greer-plaintiffs-counsel-300443002.html


"O interesse na comunidade de investimento em medicina de fazer parte desta rodada de financiamento foi muito maior do que o esperado", disse Wei Su, Ph.D., fundador e CEO da Visunex Medical Systems Inc. "Esta nova rodada de financiamento leva o total investido na Visunex Medical para $32 milhões e permitirá que a empresa amplie suas operações de manufatura para atender a demanda do mercado. Também aumentaremos o investimento em Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento, inclusive nos recursos, para a oferta de produtos e opções clínicas opcionais por meio do desenvolvimento de pipeline e lançamento no mercado. O financiamento da Série B também viabiliza que a Visunex esteja alinha à sua estratégia de longo prazo". A família PanoCam de sistemas de imagem digital sem fio de amplo campo são os sistemas de imagem de fundo de 130 graus mais avançados disponíveis para bebês recém -nascidos e crianças. A tecnologia sem fio única viabiliza uma portabilidade, mobilidade e flexibilidade real para UCIN, UCIP (NICU, PICU) ou berçário. Os sistemas PanoCam são a primeira solução viável para imagens remotas e telemedicina, permitindo que os usuários levem apenas uma maleta modelo LT com o sistema para vários locais e clínicas. Os usuários também podem usar a câmera IRIS portátil sem fio do sistema Pro ou o novo Solo PanoCam em uma bolsa personalizada, e obter imagens durante muitas horas com uma carga da bateria. Nenhum outro sistema de imagens para recém-nascidos oferece a portabilidade e versatilidade sem fio única da PanoCam. A Visunex Medical Systems, Inc. é uma empresa de tecnologia médica que desenvolve, manufatura e comercializa sistemas e serviços ópticos integrados para aprimorar a capacidade dos clínicos de diagnosticar, gerenciar e tratar doenças dos olhos. A família PanoCam de sistemas digitais sem fio de campo amplo está revolucionando o padrão da avaliação oftalmológica de bebês e crianças. A tecnologia de imagem sem fio, juntamente com a conectividade pronta para Telemedicina, em conformidade com as opções de armazenamento na nuvem HIPPA, estão redefinindo a triagem de telemedicina para oftalmologia de recém-nascidos e pediátrica.


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

FREMONT CA--(Marketwired - May 05, 2017) - Visunex Medical Systems, manufacturer of advanced wireless, wide-field imaging systems for newborn infants announces it has successfully raised $20 million in a Series B funding. Visunex introduced the first and only wireless digital imaging platform for imaging the eye of neonatal and full term infants. Launched officially outside the US in June 2016, and at the Academy of Ophthalmology in Chicago in October of 2016, the Visunex PanoCam family, the LT and Pro wireless wide-field imaging systems, will soon be joined by a third sibling system in June of this year. The new configuration is intended to expand further the newborn and infant imaging market, as well as provide tools for the pediatric retina and retina segment. "The interest in the medical investment community to be part of this funding round turned out to be much more than we had anticipated," stated Wei Su, Ph.D., founder, and CEO of Visunex Medical Systems Inc. "This new round of funding brings the total investment into Visunex Medical to $32 million, and will allow the company to expand manufacturing operations to meet the market demand. We will also increase our investment in R&D, including resources, to bring additional products and clinical options through the development pipeline and into the market. The Series B funding allows Visunex to stay on course with our long-term strategy." "In the past, the market for newborn and pediatric imaging has been primarily centered on the clinical needs of premature infants, retinoblastoma and abusive head trauma. The need for telemedicine solutions and additional qualified and willing clinical readers to enable wide area network screening, have been apparent for some time, and recognized by the medical societies in these segments. The PanoCam family of systems are the first to be designed specifically for these types of scenarios, offering an option for clinicians from the private office to the operating room," stated Paul Kealey, Senior Vice President of Visunex Medical. "The forward-looking product and market strategy encompasses a product portfolio beyond the documentation needs of these segments." The PanoCam family of wireless wide-field digital imaging systems are the most advanced 130-degree fundus imaging systems available for use on newborn infants and children. The unique wireless technology allows true portability, mobility, and flexibility for NICU, PICU or nursery. The PanoCam systems are the first viable solution for remote imaging and telemedicine, allowing the user to take only the mobile model LT suitcase system around to multiple sites and clinics. Users can also use the unique wireless IRIS hand-held camera only, from either the Pro or new Solo PanoCam system in the custom camera pouch, and image for several hours on a battery charge. No other infant imaging systems offer the unique wireless portability and versatility of PanoCam. Visunex Medical Systems, Inc. is a medical technology company that develops, manufactures and markets integrated optical systems and services to enhance the clinician's ability to diagnose, manage and treat eye disorders. The PanoCam family of wireless, wide-field integrated digital systems, is revolutionizing the standard of ophthalmologic evaluation in infants and children. The wireless imaging technology, combined with the Telemedicine-ready connectivity and HIPPA compliant cloud storage options, are redefining telemedicine screening for newborns and pediatric ophthalmology.


News Article | October 27, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

BUFFALO, N.Y. - A study by University at Buffalo researchers has shown that physicians in pediatric intensive care units are not using the newest guidelines to diagnose acute kidney injury (AKI) in critically ill children, a practice that could affect their patients' long-term health. A pediatric critical care physician who focuses on acute kidney injury, Amanda Hassinger surveyed colleagues in her field on practice patterns related to the diagnosis and treatment of AKI, a condition that affects about 15 percent of critically ill children. The prevalence of AKI among patients in pediatric intensive care units is on the rise, which, she says, lends more urgency to gauging the current state of AKI management in pediatric intensive care units (PICUs). The results were discouraging, Hassinger reports in a recent paper in the journal Pediatric Critical Care Medicine. "What we found was pretty surprising. It was scarier than I thought in terms of how aware other physicians in my field are to the new guidelines for treatment of AKI and the new methods to diagnosis earlier and more effectively," said Hassinger, MD, MS, lead author on the paper, published in the journal's August issue. She wrote it while working on her master's degree in epidemiology/clinical research in UB's School of Public Health and Health Professions. Hassinger has been an attending physician in the Division of Critical Care at Women & Children's Hospital of Buffalo, and is also an assistant professor of pediatrics in UB's Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences and a member of UBMD Pediatrics. Hassinger and her co-authors surveyed 170 pediatric critical care physicians from academic centers, the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury and Sepsis Investigators network and the pediatric branch of the Society of Critical Care Medicine. The survey consisted of more than two-dozen questions. Among them, researchers asked what criteria the physicians frequently rely on to diagnose acute kidney injury in young patients. Half of the respondents reported not using recent AKI guidelines or diagnostic criteria in clinical practice. Specifically, 74 percent of physicians said they diagnose AKI using serum creatinine and urine output only, despite the fact that newer, more reliable, tests are available. The problem with serum creatinine as a test for renal function, Hassinger says, is that it is not effective in children for detecting AKI. It can be affected by several other factors, including nutrition and muscle mass. Several new biomarkers have been discovered that aid in the diagnosis of AKI. Diagnosing AKI in children in clinical practice has also proven difficult because there is not a consensus definition of AKI in pediatric patients. Several guidelines and criteria are available, but there is a lack of knowledge among pediatric intensive care physicians about which ones to use, leading to variability in how children are treated in the ICU, according to Hassinger. "I wasn't surprised that the newer tests aren't being used, because they do cost a lot of money and require special machinery," Hassinger says. "But what really upset me was that physicians were happy with the status quo and weren't looking for a better biomarker for this critically important condition. The existing biomarkers are inadequate. That was disappointing." AKI occurs most frequently in patients who are already in the hospital. It can be caused by a number of health conditions, including sepsis, shock, trauma, exposure to medications that affect the kidneys, or major surgery. What's more, according to the National Kidney Foundation, one episode of AKI increases a patient's chances of developing other health problems -- such as kidney disease, stroke or heart disease -- later in life. In fact, Hassinger said, data now show that children who experience a single episode of AKI in the ICU have a 5o percent to 75 percent chance of having renal insufficiency for the rest of their life. "It's an important but silent issue that needs more attention," she says. "The kidneys are a very vulnerable set of organs and they're important to overall balance in the body, so we should be paying more attention to them than we do. Somebody has to fight for the little beans." "This study gives us an important picture of what practice looks like in pediatric ICUs, so that we can understand what is missing," said Jo Freudenheim, PhD, chair of epidemiology and environmental health in UB's School of Public Health and Health Professions, and a co-author on the paper. "We can now start to make renewed efforts to change practice and to improve care." Hassinger has an idea why AKI often goes underappreciated. "The kidneys are extremely resilient, and children are resilient, so even if you have the worst stage of acute kidney injury, despite the physician, the kidneys and the patient get better. There's not as much urgency to diagnose it and call it the right name because most of the time, no matter what name you call it, kids will bounce back pretty well," she said. Toward that point, the researchers' survey asked physicians if they were aware that AKI independently has increased morbidity and mortality. Twelve percent of the respondents -- a particularly high number, Hassinger says -- said either no or that they were unsure. Hassinger was also surprised to learn that just one-third of the PICU physicians surveyed said they refer a child who has AKI to a kidney specialist once the patient is discharged from the intensive care unit. That means that two-thirds of the respondents reported either rarely or never offering referrals. "So these patients go unmonitored for periods of time until the kidney issues manifest when they're teenagers and they get an infection or another injury that knocks out the kidneys completely, and then they're in renal failure at 18," Hassinger said. Hassinger is partnering with a colleague at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center for a second survey that will take a closer look at the relationship between fluid overload and acute kidney injury in ICU patients. Fluids, given through IVs, are used regularly in hospitalized children. Fluid overload can cause organs to fail, Hassinger said, explaining why that's another area of current medical practice that needs better scrutiny. Other investigators on the paper were Sudha Garimella, clinical assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics in UB's Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences and medical director of the Pediatric Dialysis Unit at Women & Children's Hospital of Buffalo, and Brian Wrotniak of the Department of Pediatrics.


PubMed | Center hospitalier Rene Dubos, Institute Of Puericulture Et Of Perinatalogie, Center hospitalier Victor Dupouy, PICU and 7 more.
Type: | Journal: International journal of nursing studies | Year: 2016

Heelstick is the most frequently performed skin-breaking procedure in the neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). There are no large multicenter studies describing the frequency and analgesic approaches used for heelsticks performed in NICUs.To describe the frequency of heelsticks and their analgesic management in newborns in the NICU. To determine the factors associated with the lack of specific preprocedural analgesia for this procedure.EPIPPAIN 2 (Epidemiology of Procedural PAin In Neonates) is a descriptive prospective epidemiologic study.All 16 NICUs in the Paris region in France.All newborns in the NICU with a maximum corrected age of 44 weeks +6 days of gestation on admission who had at least one heelstick during the study period were eligible for the study. The study included 562 newborns.Data on all heelsticks and their corresponding analgesic therapies were prospectively collected. The inclusion period lasted six weeks, from June 2, 2011 to July 12, 2011. Newborns were followed from their admission to the 14th day of their NICU stay or discharge, whichever occurred first.The mean (SD) gestational age was 33.3 (4.4) weeks and duration of participation was 7.5 (4.4) days. The mean (SD; range) of heelsticks per neonate was 16.0 (14.4; 1-86) during the study period. Of the 8995 heelsticks studied, 2379 (26.4%) were performed with continuous analgesia, 5236 (58.2%) with specific preprocedural analgesia. Overall, 6764 (75.2%) heelsticks were performed with analgesia (continuous and/or specific). In a multivariate model, the increased lack of preprocedural analgesia was associated with female sex, term birth, high illness severity, tracheal or noninvasive ventilation, parental absence and use of continuous sedation/analgesia.Heelstick was very frequently performed in NICUs. Although, most heelsticks were performed with analgesia, this was not systematic. The high frequency of this procedure and the known adverse effects of repetitive pain in neonates should encourage the search of safe and effective strategies to reduce their number.


PubMed | Center Hospitalier Rene Dubos, Center Hospitalier Victor Dupouy, Center Hospitalier Delafontaine, PICU and 7 more.
Type: | Journal: International journal of nursing studies | Year: 2016

Newborns in intensive care units (ICUs) undergo numerous painful procedures including venipunctures. Skin-breaking procedures have been associated with adverse neurodevelopment long-term effects in very preterm neonates. The venipuncture frequency and its real bedside pain management treatment are not well known in this setting.To describe venipuncture frequency, its pain intensity, and the analgesic approach in ICU newborns; to determine the factors associated with the lack of preprocedural analgesia and with a high pain score during venipuncture.Further analysis of EPIPPAIN 2 (Epidemiology of Procedural Pain In Neonates), which is a descriptive prospective epidemiologic study.All 16 neonatal and pediatric ICUs in the Paris region in France.All newborns in the ICU with a maximum corrected age under 45 weeks of gestation on admission who had at least one venipuncture during the study period.Data on all venipunctures, their pain score assessed with the DAN scale and their corresponding analgesic therapies were prospectively collected. The inclusion period lasted six weeks, from June 2, 2011, to July 12, 2011. Newborns were followed from their admission to the 14th day of their ICU stay or discharge, whichever occurred first.495 newborns who underwent venipunctures were included. The mean (SD) gestational age was 33.0 (4.4) weeks and duration of participation was 8.0 (4.5) days. A total of 257 (51.9%) neonates were very preterm (<33 weeks). The mean (SD; range) number of venipunctures per neonate during the study period was 3.8 (2.8; 1-19) for all neonates and 4.1 (2.9; 1-17) for neonates <33 weeks. Of the 1887 venipunctures, 1164 (61.7%) were performed successfully in one attempt, 437 (23.2%) with continuous analgesia, 1434 (76.0%) with specific preprocedural analgesia. In multivariate models, lack of preprocedural analgesia was associated with higher disease-severity score, intrauterine growth retardation, invasive or noninvasive ventilation, venipuncture performed on the first day of hospitalization or at nighttime, and the use of continuous sedation/analgesia. High pain scores were significantly associated with absence of parents during procedures, surgery during the study period, and higher number of attempts.Venipuncture is very frequent in preterm and term neonates in the ICUs. 76% were performed with preprocedural analgesia. Strategies to reduce the number of attempts and to promote parental presence seem necessary.


Vogiatzi L.,Hippokration Hospital | Ilia S.,University of Crete | Sideri G.,Aglaia Kyriakou Childrens Hospital | Vagelakoudi E.,Aghia Sophia Childrens Hospital | And 7 more authors.
Intensive Care Medicine | Year: 2013

Purpose: To record the practices for prevention and management of invasive candidiasis in the PICU and investigate the epidemiology of candidiasis and its outcome nationwide. Methods: A multicenter national study among PICUs throughout Greece. A questionnaire referring to local practices of prevention and management of candidemia was filled in, and a retrospective study of episodes that occurred during 5 years was conducted in all seven Greek PICUs. Results: Clinical practices regarding surveillance cultures, catheter replacement protocols and antibiotic use were similar, although the case mix differed. In all PICUs prophylactic antifungal treatment was administered in transplant and neutropenic oncology patients. Discrepancy existed between PICUs concerning the first-line antifungal agents and treatment duration of candidemia. Twenty-two candidemias were nationally recorded between 2005 and 2009 with a median incidence of 6.4 cases/1,000 admissions. Median age was 8.2 (0.3-16.6) years. Candida albicans was isolated in 45.4 % of episodes followed by Candida parapsilosis (22.7 %). Common findings were presence of central venous and urinary catheters as well as mechanical ventilation and administration of antibiotics with anti-anaerobic activity in almost all patients with candidemia. Total parenteral nutrition was administered to five (22.7 %) patients. Most of the patients had a chronic underlying disease; five were oncology patients, and two-thirds of those with candidemia were colonized with Candida spp. Lipid amphotericin B formulations were the predominant therapeutic choice (54.5 %). Thirty-day mortality was 18.2 %. Conclusion: This first national study adds information to the epidemiology of candidemia in critically ill children. In these special patients, candidemia has a relatively low incidence and tends toward non-albicans Candida preponderance. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg and ESICM.


FREMONT CA--(Marketwired - December 16, 2016) - Visunex Medical Systems of Fremont California announces its support in the fight against the devastating effects of the Zika virus. Providing the PanoCam LT wireless, wide-field infant fundus imaging system at cost to the Lucille Ellis Simon Foundation, Visunex Medical will also provide on-site personnel for training and support in Brazil for the program's initial charter. The Foundation purchased the unit as part of a donation to Yale University Research, whose team recently determined how the virus infects the placenta1, and how it causes fetal brain damage2. In late August, the Yale team comprised of five disciplines announced significant headway in efforts to solve the Zika virus puzzle3. First discovered in 1947, the Zika virus initially led to outbreaks in humans living in tropical Africa, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific Islands. Brazil has been both in the news and on the front line of the effects of this virus, that can be devastating to newborn infants. As of November of this year, the virus had spread through most of the Americas with cases reported in nearly every Central and South American country and territory, as well as the United States4. In a recently released report in JAMA Pediatrics, CDC researchers describe five types of birth defects that are either unique to Zika, or occur rarely with other infections during pregnancy. Among these are severe microcephaly (decreased brain tissue with a specific pattern of calcium deposits) and damage to the back of the eye with a specific pattern of scarring and increased pigment. The PanoCam LT wireless portable imaging system is used to screen the eyes of infants and small children to look for this scarring effect of the virus on the retina. In some cases, this may be the only apparent sign of the virus presence. The wireless IRIS (Independent Remote Imaging System), hand-held camera component of the LT system, provides clinician with a 130° field of view of the pediatric retina on its integrated monitor. "The design of the PanoCam IRIS hand-held camera allows the technician to image infants and children nearly anywhere in the world, no matter how remote." stated Paul Kealey, Visunex Medical Systems, Sr. Vice President of Corporate Development. "We are very honored to work with the Lucille Ellis Simon Foundation, and contribute in some way to this important program as part of their contributions to children's health services." About the PanoCam Digital System The PanoCam family of wireless wide-field digital imaging systems are the most advanced 130-degree fundus imaging systems available for use on newborn infants and children. The unique wireless technology allows true portability, mobility and flexibility for NICU, PICU or nursery. The PanoCam LT system is the first viable solution for remote imaging and telemedicine, allowing the user to take only the suitcase system, or only the IRIS hand-held camera and image for several hours on a battery charge. About Visunex Medical Visunex Medical Systems, Inc., is a medical technology company that develops, manufactures and markets integrated optical systems and services to enhance the clinician's ability to diagnose, manage and treat eye disorders. The PanoCam family of wireless, wide-field integrated digital systems, is revolutionizing the standard of ophthalmologic evaluation in infants and children. The wireless imaging technology, combined with the Telemedicine-ready connectivity and HIPPA compliant cloud storage options, are redefining telemedicine screening for newborns and pediatric ophthalmology.


WALNUT CREEK, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--John Muir Health and Stanford Children’s Health are continuing to expand access to children’s specialty care services in Contra Costa County through an innovative partnership launched just a few years ago. Local families now have access to nearly 50 pediatric specialist physicians and nurse practitioners in 14 different specialties, including cardiology, gastroenterology, orthopedics and sports medicine, pulmonology, urology and more. “We listened and responded to the requests from our community and general pediatricians to enhance and expand the availability of children’s specialty services in our community so families could access and receive the care they need close to home,” said Jane Willemsen, president and CAO of John Muir Health’s Walnut Creek medical center. “Our partnership is exceeding what we originally envisioned and continues to grow, all for the benefit of our community and young patients and their families.” “Stanford Children’s Health has long been committed to successful community partnerships with Bay Area health care providers,” said Christopher G. Dawes, president and CEO of Stanford Children’s Health. “Our strong partnership with John Muir Health increases access and convenience to world-class pediatric specialty care and is a very successful example of how our combined strengths can benefit the community.” The partnership includes outpatient, inpatient, neonatal and emergency care, which enables children with conditions ranging from allergies to more complex illnesses to see specialists locally through John Muir Health. In April 2015, John Muir Health and Stanford Children’s Health jointly opened a state-of-the art pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) at John Muir Medical Center, Walnut Creek -- the only one of its kind in Contra Costa County. The PICU is complemented by a 16-bed child and adolescent unit and 35-bed Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) also at the Walnut Creek medical center. In just 18 months, the PICU team of Stanford Children’s Health physicians and John Muir Health nurses and staff has cared for 450 critically ill children. The PICU offers leading-edge medical technology, and a broad complement of pediatric specialists, including pediatric-trained nursing staff, pediatric anesthesiologists, radiologists, neurologists, surgeons, gastroenterologists, orthopedists, oncologists, and hematologists, among others. John Muir Health and Stanford Children’s Health are also in the process of finalizing all necessary steps to have the PICU certified by California Children’s Services (CCS), a rigorous and exclusive certification program for the treatment of children with complex medical conditions. “Pediatric specialists are rare. In partnership with Stanford Children’s Health, we have broadened our services so we can care for children and families close to home, right here in Contra Costa County,” said Budi Wiryawan, M.D. medical director, John Muir Health PICU, and clinical associate professor of pediatric critical care medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. “It’s a privilege to work with a team of professionals so dedicated to working with children and families, a team that consistently goes above and beyond to deliver top quality care for children with critical needs.” The need for PICU and other specialty services in Contra Costa County has been proven many times in the past few years. “My son had a near drowning experience last year, when he was four years old. We performed CPR on site and he was brought to John Muir Medical Center in Walnut Creek where he was treated by the team in the PICU. The doctor was concerned about the 24-48 hour window post resuscitation, as my son could have had a fatal injury to his brain and lungs,” said Sadie Hannah, parent of a former John Muir Health PICU patient. “I remember walking into the unit and seeing the kindness in the team’s eyes, as if they knew exactly how we felt and knew exactly what to do. I knew immediately we were in the right place for healing. The atmosphere was quiet and serene, it seemed we had 100 percent of the staff’s attention. We had caring, honest discussions with the medical team. We are grateful to John Muir Health for its quality care, good communication, quiet comfort, and its location close to home. Thankfully my son is fine. He returned to swim lessons five days after being in the PICU and started kindergarten this year.” “It’s heartwarming to hear the stories of children who we have cared for and to meet their grateful parents,” said Willemsen. “We’ve always been here for our patients and the community, but now we can treat and care for children of all ages.” For more information about the specialty services available at John Muir Health through the Stanford Children’s Health partnership, please visit www.johnmuirhealth.com/services/childrens-services. John Muir Health is a nationally recognized, not-for-profit health care organization east of San Francisco serving patients in Contra Costa, eastern Alameda and southern Solano Counties. It includes a network of more than 1,000 primary care and specialty physicians, nearly 6,000 employees, medical centers in Concord and Walnut Creek, including Contra Costa County’s only trauma center, and a Behavioral Health Center. John Muir Health also has partnerships with Tenet Healthcare/San Ramon Regional Medical Center, UCSF Medical Center and Stanford Children's Health to expand its capabilities, increase access to services and better serve patients. The health system offers a full-range of medical services, including primary care, outpatient and imaging services, and is widely recognized as a leader in many specialties – neurosciences, orthopedic, cancer, cardiovascular, trauma, emergency, pediatrics and high-risk obstetrics care. Stanford Children’s Health is the largest Bay Area health care enterprise exclusively dedicated to children and expectant mothers. At the heart of our network is the renowned Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford in Palo Alto. Together with our Stanford Medicine physicians, nurses, and staff, we can be accessed within 10 miles of most Bay Area homes through partnerships, collaborations, outreach, specialty clinics and primary care practices at more than 60 locations across Northern California and 100 locations in the U.S. western region. We are a leader in world-class, nurturing care and extraordinary outcomes in every pediatric and obstetric specialty, with care ranging from the routine to rare, regardless of a family’s ability to pay. As a non-profit, we are committed to supporting our community – from caring for uninsured or underinsured kids, homeless teens and pregnant moms, to helping re-establish school nurse positions in local schools. Learn more at stanfordchildrens.org and on our Healthier, Happy Lives blog. Join us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube.

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