Phytolutions GmbH

Bremen, Germany

Phytolutions GmbH

Bremen, Germany
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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: BSG-SME | Phase: SME-1 | Award Amount: 1.32M | Year: 2008

This project proposes a new -highly efficient- method for intracellular protein recovery form yeast electroextraction. Moreover, a novel bio processing strategy will be developed based on its combination with subsequent direct product capture onto a suitable solid phase. Selective recovery of the yeast intracellular soluble proteome will be attempted by permeabilization of cell envelope with high intensity electric field pulses. This treatment as already shown in laboratory experiments leads to a selective release of soluble cytoplasmic proteins, without cell disintegration and with high product yields. The electropermeabilization will be performed in continuous mode under conditions allowing greater selectivity for the targeted species, and limited protease release to avoid product damage. The method will be tested employing several types of commercially relevant yeasts. Sorption is a proven method for efficient product recovery from fermentation liquors or disrupted biomass. The compatibility of the electrically treated feedstock with commercial beaded adsorbents for direct product capture will be assessed, under real process conditions. Operational windows will be defined to allow for product sorption in stirred tank or fluidized bed contactors. Mass transfer properties of the whole system will be explored. Better utilization of total adsorbent ligand sites is expected since less potential interfering substances (nucleic acids, organelles, cell debris) will be liberated. Therefore, a powerful technology for intracellular protein recovery and purification can be envisioned by coupling electroextraction and immediate soluble product sequestration onto a suitable solid phase. Electroextraction will provide a route for more facile, efficient, and economical processing of intracellular bioproducts from yeast fermentations that are valuable for the chemical, food, and pharmaceutical industries.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: OCEAN.2011-1 | Award Amount: 6.73M | Year: 2012

The key objective of the TROPOS project is the development of a floating modular multi-use platform system for use in deep waters, with an initial geographic focus on the Mediterranean, Tropical and Sub-Tropical regions but designed to be flexible enough not to be limited in geographic scope. The TROPOS approach is centered on the modular development where different types of modules can be combined as appropriate in each area. In this way, the TROPOS multi-use platform system is able to integrate a range of functions from the transport, energy, aquaculture and leisure sectors, in a greater number of geographical areas than if it was a set platform design. This subsequently provides greater opportunities for profitability. The TROPOS design will focus on a floating multi-purpose structure able to operate in, and exploit, deep waters, where fixed structures such as those piled in the seabed are not feasible. The multi-use platforms developed from the concept designs will have the potential to provide European coastal regions with appropriate aquaculture systems, innovative transport services as well as leisure and offshore energy solutions. The main S/T objectives of the project are: To determine, based on both numerical and physical modeling, the optimal locations for multi-use offshore platforms in Mediterranean, sub-tropical and tropical latitudes To research the relations between oceanic activities, including wind energy, aquaculture, transport solutions for shipping, and other additional services To develop novel, cost-efficient and modular multi-use platform designs, that enable optimal coupling of the various services and activities To study the logistical requirements of the novel multi-use platform To assess the economic feasibility and viability of the platform To develop a comprehensive environmental impact methodology and assessment To configure at least three complete solutions, for the Mediterranean, Sub-tropical and tropical areas


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: BSG-SME | Phase: SME-2011-1 | Award Amount: 1.24M | Year: 2011

Currently, different origin waste oils have been used mostly as animal feed, raw material for soap makers, and feed stock for fatty acid production. The existent patents and commercial processes to make fatty acids from waste oils always refers to hydrolysis and acidification steps using strong acids such as sulphuric or hydrochloridic acids, producing a mixture of fatty acids, inorganic salts, water, and other small components such as glycerine or phospholipids. Waste technical fats can provide a raw material basis for the production of surfactants. This amount of waste oil will serve as raw material for obtaining bio-surfactant and ester oils by biotechnological processes. This project Bio-SURFEST will develop two biotechnological processes at semi-industrial scale in order to produce two different classes of bio-products, bio-surfactants and ester oils (non useful for biodiesel production). Bio-surfactants will be produced by fermentative process and ester oils will be produced by enzymatic catalysis. Both biotechnological methods will use as raw materials or feedstock fry waste oil or technical fats. The main goal of the project Bio-SURFEST is to obtain high-value compounds such as bio-surfactants and ester oils from waste oils or technical fats, which represent a low value residue from a great variety of industries like hotels, restaurants, vegetable oil industry, biodiesel producers, etc. The aim of the present project is to determine suitable technical and economical production methods in order to obtain biosurfactants and other bio-products of high added value. Bio-SURFEST is focusing on the biotechnological optimisation of bio-products synthesis, using techniques such as fermentation and enzymatic catalysis. Using this approach, tailor-made bio-products will be obtained, purified and finally tested for their use in different applications.


Rwehumbiza V.M.,Jacobs University Bremen | Vennapusa R.R.,ChiPro GmbH | Vennapusa R.R.,Shantha Biotechnics | Gavara P.R.,Jacobs University Bremen | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Chemical Technology and Biotechnology | Year: 2014

BACKGROUND: Complex polysaccharides are important in the pharmaceutical industry, yet, due to their large molecular weight and reduced charges, their purification is a highly demanding process that requires binding matrices with unique properties. This work demonstrates for the first time that complex polysaccharides biosynthesized by microalga Porphyridium purpureum can be adsorbed onto Q fibrous anion exchangers. RESULTS: When the polysaccharides were characterized, the extent of sulfation was higher in native polysaccharides than in ethanol- or alkali-extracts. The zeta potentials increased with increasing pH and the highest charge was observed at pH 8, while the Z-average diameters of the polysaccharide at pH 6 were highest for alkali-extracts. Instead of pellicular resins, Q fibrous adsorbents were used to determine Langmuir thermodynamic properties and dynamic binding capacities. The parameters included static binding capacity and dissociation constant of 13.47 ± 1.02 mg g-1 and 0.141 ± 0.027 mg mL-1, and 10 and 50% breakthrough capacities of 4.46 ± 0.22 and 5.51 ± 0.28 mg g-1, respectively. The antiviral activity of the polysaccharides was demonstrated by minimizing bacteriophage lysis of Streptococcus thermophilus. CONCLUSION: This work demonstrates that polysaccharide extraction can be optimized and the adsorption and desorption of a complex polysaccharide onto Q fibrous matrix is feasible. These parameters could be exploited for up-scaling of polysaccharides for nutraceutical and pharmaceutical applications. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.


Gaebler-Schwarz S.,Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research | Davidson A.,Australian Antarctic Division | Assmy P.,Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research | Chen J.,Xiamen University | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Phycology | Year: 2010

Few members of the well-studied marine phytoplankton taxa have such a complex and polymorphic life cycle as the genus Phaeocystis. However, despite the ecological and biogeochemical importance of Phaeocystis blooms, the life cycle of the major bloom-forming species of this genus remains illusive and poorly resolved. At least six different life stages and up to 15 different functional components of the life cycle have been proposed. Our culture and field observations indicate that there is a previously unrecognized stage in the life cycle of P. antarctica G. Karst. This stage comprises nonmotile cells that range in size from ∼4.2 to 9.8 μm in diameter and form aggregates in which interstitial spaces between cells are small or absent. The aggregates (hereafter called attached aggregates, AAs) adhere to available surfaces. In field samples, small AAs, surrounded by a colony skin, adopt an epiphytic lifestyle and adhere in most cases to setae or spines of diatoms. These AAs, either directly or via other life stages, produce the colonial life stage. Culture studies indicate that bloom-forming, colonial stages release flagellates (microzoospores) that fuse and form AAs, which can proliferate on the bottom of culture vessels and can eventually reform free-floating colonies. We propose that these AAs are a new stage in the life cycle of P. antarctica, which we believe to be the zygote, thus documenting sexual reproduction in this species for the first time. © 2010 Phycological Society of America.


Barbot Y.N.,Jacobs University Bremen | Thomsen C.,Phytolutions GmbH | Thomsen L.,Jacobs University Bremen | Benz R.,Jacobs University Bremen
Marine Drugs | Year: 2015

The cultivation of macroalgae to supply the biofuel, pharmaceutical or food industries generates a considerable amount of organic residue, which represents a potential substrate for biomethanation. Its use optimizes the total resource exploitation by the simultaneous disposal of waste biomaterials. In this study, we explored the biochemical methane potential (BMP) and biomethane recovery of industrial Laminaria japonica waste (LJW) in batch, continuous laboratory and pilot-scale trials. Thermo-acidic pretreatment with industry-grade HCl or industrial flue gas condensate (FGC), as well as a co-digestion approach with maize silage (MS) did not improve the biomethane recovery. BMPs between 172 mL and 214 mL g-1 volatile solids (VS) were recorded. We proved the feasibility of long-term continuous anaerobic digestion with LJW as sole feedstock showing a steady biomethane production rate of 173 mL g-1 VS. The quality of fermentation residue was sufficient to serve as biofertilizer, with enriched amounts of potassium, sulfur and iron. We further demonstrated the upscaling feasibility of the process in a pilot-scale system where a CH4 recovery of 189 L kg-1 VS was achieved and a biogas composition of 55% CH4 and 38% CO2 was recorded. ©2015 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.


Coustets M.,CNRS Institute of Pharmacology and Structural Biology | Coustets M.,Toulouse 1 University Capitole | Al-Karablieh N.,Phytolutions GmbH | Thomsen C.,Phytolutions GmbH | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Membrane Biology | Year: 2013

Classical methods for protein extraction from microorganisms, used for large-scale treatments such as mechanical or chemical processes, affect the integrity of extracted cytosolic protein by releasing proteases contained in vacuoles. Our previous experiments on flow-process yeast electroextraction proved that pulsed electric field technology allows us to preserve the integrity of released cytosolic proteins by keeping intact vacuole membranes. Furthermore, large volumes are easily treated by the flow technology. Based on this previous knowledge, we developed a new protocol in order to electroextract total cytoplasmic proteins from microalgae (Nannochloropsis salina and Chlorella vulgaris). Given that induction of electropermeabilization is under the control of the target cell size, as the mean diameter for N. salina is only 2.5 μm, we used repetitive 2-ms-long pulses of alternating polarities with stronger field strengths than previously described for yeasts. The electric treatment was followed by a 24-h incubation period in a salty buffer. The amount of total protein released was evaluated by a classical Bradford assay. A more accurate evaluation of protein release was obtained by SDS-PAGE. Similar results were obtained with C. vulgaris under milder electrical conditions, as expected from their larger size. This innovative technology designed in our group should become familiar in the field of microalgae biotechnology. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.


PubMed | Phytolutions GmbH and Jacobs University Bremen
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Marine drugs | Year: 2015

The cultivation of macroalgae to supply the biofuel, pharmaceutical or food industries generates a considerable amount of organic residue, which represents a potential substrate for biomethanation. Its use optimizes the total resource exploitation by the simultaneous disposal of waste biomaterials. In this study, we explored the biochemical methane potential (BMP) and biomethane recovery of industrial Laminaria japonica waste (LJW) in batch, continuous laboratory and pilot-scale trials. Thermo-acidic pretreatment with industry-grade HCl or industrial flue gas condensate (FGC), as well as a co-digestion approach with maize silage (MS) did not improve the biomethane recovery. BMPs between 172 mL and 214 mL g(-1) volatile solids (VS) were recorded. We proved the feasibility of long-term continuous anaerobic digestion with LJW as sole feedstock showing a steady biomethane production rate of 173 mL g(-1) VS. The quality of fermentation residue was sufficient to serve as biofertilizer, with enriched amounts of potassium, sulfur and iron. We further demonstrated the upscaling feasibility of the process in a pilot-scale system where a CH recovery of 189 L kg(-1) VS was achieved and a biogas composition of 55% CH and 38% CO was recorded.

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