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Norris M.J.,University of Toronto | Duan W.,Physiology and Experimental Medicine | Cen Y.,Physiology and Experimental Medicine | Moraes T.J.,University of Toronto
Antiviral Research | Year: 2016

Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) remains a leading cause of infant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite this, there are limited therapeutic options. CD8 T cells have an integral role in controlling viral infections; strategies to enhance these responses may be clinically relevant. The T cell costimulatory receptor, 4-1BB, is known to play a role in expansion of antiviral CD8 T cells. In this study, we examined the effect of agonistic 4-1BB antibody at the time of RSV infection in mice. We show that this antibody did not improve outcomes in the setting of RSV infection but rather, led to increased weight loss and a reduction in RSV specific CD8 T cells in the lung. This work suggests caution in the use of agonistic 4-1BB antibody in the setting of viral infections. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


PubMed | University of Toronto and Physiology and Experimental Medicine
Type: | Journal: Antiviral research | Year: 2016

Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) remains a leading cause of infant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite this, there are limited therapeutic options. CD8 T cells have an integral role in controlling viral infections; strategies to enhance these responses may be clinically relevant. The T cell costimulatory receptor, 4-1BB, is known to play a role in expansion of antiviral CD8 T cells. In this study, we examined the effect of agonistic 4-1BB antibody at the time of RSV infection in mice. We show that this antibody did not improve outcomes in the setting of RSV infection but rather, led to increased weight loss and a reduction in RSV specific CD8 T cells in the lung. This work suggests caution in the use of agonistic 4-1BB antibody in the setting of viral infections.

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