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Pullman, WA, United States

Carter A.H.,Washington State University | Garland-Campbell K.,Physiology and Disease Research Unit | Kidwell K.K.,Washington State University
Crop Science | Year: 2011

Understanding the genetic factors underlying agronomic traits in common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is essential to making gains from selection during the breeding process. A set of 188 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) from a 'Louise' × 'Penawawa' mapping population was grown for two crop years at two locations in the Pacifi c Northwest region of the United States to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with seedling growth habit, leaf color, plant height, fl owering date, maturity date, grain volume weight, grain protein content, and grain yield. Quantitative trait loci for fl owering date and maturity date were associated with the Ppd- D1 gene for photoperiod insensitivity. Variation in the QTL for plant height was dependent on location and year and localized to chromosome 2D and 3B. A QTL for leaf color was identified on chromosome 2B. Seedling growth habit mapped to chromosome 2D, and a significant QTL for grain volume weight was detected on chromosome 1B. Quantitative trait loci were identified for grain yield; however, some of these QTL were associated with other known QTL for pest resistance, seedling growth habit, or photoperiod insensitivity. Flowering date, maturity date, and plant height were significantly correlated, which resulted from the pleiotropic effects of the Ppd- D1 gene. The identification of agronomic QTL, and the correlations between and among them, is the first step toward making gains from selection using molecular marker-assisted selection for these important agronomic traits. © Crop Science Society of America. Source


Griffey C.A.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | Thomason W.E.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | Pitman R.M.,Eastern Virginia Agriculture Res. and Ext. Ctr | Paling J.J.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | And 27 more authors.
Journal of Plant Registrations | Year: 2011

'Merl' (Reg. No. CV-1052, PI 658598) soft red winter (SRW) wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), developed and tested as VA03W-412 by the Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station, was released in March 2009. Merl was derived from the three-way cross 'Roane'/Pioneer variety 2643//'38158' (PI 619052). Merl is a broadly adapted, high-yielding, mid-season, moderately short, semidwarf (Rht2) cultivar having above-average straw strength and milling and pastry-baking qualities. Merl is resistant to powdery mildew [caused by Blumeria graminis (DC.) E.O. Speer] and moderately resistant to stripe rust (caused by Puccinia striiformis Westend.). In Virginia, Merl ranked among the top five cultivars for grain yield with a 3-yr (2007-2009) average of 5725 kg ha-1. Merl had a mean grain volume weight of 76.4 kg hL-1 across 22 environments, which was significantly (P < 0.05) higher (1.9-3.0 kg hL-1) than that of the other top-yielding cultivars. In USDA-ARS Uniform Eastern SRW Wheat Nursery trials conducted at 29 locations, Merl ranked sixth among 46 entries for grain yield (5917 kg ha-1) and seventh for grain volume weight (76.0 kg hL-1) in 2006 and ranked second among 45 entries for grain yield (5529 kg ha-1) and sixth for grain volume weight (75.7 kg hL-1) in 2008. Merl has a soft grain texture, flour softness equivalent values from 57.5 to 60.8 g 100 g-1, and straight-grade flour yields from 70.5 to 71.5 g kg-1. The flour protein concentration (7.5-8.7 g 100 g-1) and gluten strength, assessed via lactic acid solvent retention capacity (101-104 g 100 g-1), of Merl are lower than average. These quality attributes contribute to Merl's above-average pastry-baking quality (cookie-spread diameters of 17.93-18.93 cm). © Crop Science Society of America. Source


Griffey C.A.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | Thomason W.E.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | Pitman R.M.,Eastern Virginia Agriculture Res. and Ext. Ctr | Gundrum P.G.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | And 28 more authors.
Journal of Plant Registrations | Year: 2011

'SW049029104' (Reg. No. CV-1053, PI 658599) soft red winter (SRW) wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was developed and released by the Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station in March 2009. SW049029104 was derived from the cross '38158' (PI 619052)/Pioneer variety 2552//'Roane' and was tested under the experimental number VA04W-90. SW049029104 is a broadly adapted, high-yielding, moderately short, semidwarf (Rht2) cultivar that is resistant to powdery mildew [caused by Blumeria graminis (DC.) E.O. Speer] and Fusarium head blight (caused by Fusarium graminearum Schwabe). In the 2009 USDA-ARS Uniform Southern SRW Wheat Nursery conducted at 25 locations, SW049029104 ranked first among 40 entries for grain yield (4889 kg ha-1) and fourth for grain volume weight (73.2 kg hL-1). The milling and baking qualities of SW049029104 exceeded those of 'USG 3555' and Pioneer brand 26R61. Flour softness and cookie-spread diameter of SW049029104 (61.5-64.8 g 100 g-1 and 18.39-18.48 cm) exceeded those of USG 3555 (57.9-61.1 g 100 g-1 and 18.09- 18.21 cm) and Pioneer brand 26R61 (54.5-61.1 g 100 g-1 and 18.12-18.13 cm). While flour protein concentration of SW049029104 (8.55-8.66 g 100 g-1) was lower than that of USG 3555 (8.88-9.10 g 100 g-1) and Pioneer brand 26R61 (9.65- 9.66 g 100 g-1), its gluten strength, assessed via lactic acid solvent retention capacity (124.7-129.7 g 100 g-1), exceeded that of USG 3555 (118.9-124.0 g 100 g-1) and Pioneer brand 26R61 (113.5-126.0 g 100 g-1). © Crop Science Society of America. Source


Naruoka Y.,Washington State University | Garland-Campbell K.A.,Physiology and Disease Research Unit | Carter A.H.,Washington State University
Theoretical and Applied Genetics | Year: 2015

Key message: Potential novel and known QTL for race-specific all-stage and adult plant resistance to stripe rust were identified by genome-wide association mapping in the US PNW winter wheat accessions. Abstract: Stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis F. sp. tritici; also known as yellow rust) is a globally devastating disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and a major threat to wheat production in the US Pacific Northwest (PNW), therefore both adult plant and all-stage resistance have been introduced into the winter wheat breeding programs in the PNW. The goal of this study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) and molecular markers for these resistances through genome-wide association (GWAS) mapping in winter wheat accessions adapted to the PNW. Stripe rust response for adult plants was evaluated in naturally occurring epidemics in a total of nine environments in Washington State, USA. Seedling response was evaluated with three races under artificial inoculation in the greenhouse. The panel was genotyped with the 9K Illumina Wheat single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array and additional markers linked to previously reported genes and QTL for stripe rust resistance. The population was grouped into three sub-populations. Markers linked to Yr17 and previously reported QTL for stripe rust resistance were identified on chromosomes 1B, 2A, and 2B. Potentially novel QTL associated with race-specific seedling response were identified on chromosomes 1B and 1D. Potentially novel QTL associated with adult plant response were located on chromosomes 2A, 2B, 3B, 4A, and 4B. Stripe rust was reduced when multiple alleles for resistance were present. The resistant allele frequencies were different among sub-populations in the panel. This information provides breeders with germplasm and closely linked markers for stripe rust resistance to facilitate the transfer of multiple loci for durable stripe rust resistance into wheat breeding lines and cultivars. © 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Source


Case A.J.,Washington State University | Case A.J.,University of Minnesota | Naruoka Y.,Washington State University | Chen X.,Physiology and Disease Research Unit | And 3 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2014

A recombinant inbred line (RIL) mapping population developed from a cross between winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars Coda and Brundage was evaluated for reaction to stripe rust (caused by Puccinia striiformis f. Sp. Tritici). Two hundred and sixty eight RIL from the population were evaluated in replicated field trials in a total of nine site-year locations in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. Seedling reaction to stripe rust races PST-100, PST-114 and PST-127 was also examined. A linkage map consisting of 2,391 polymorphic DNA markers was developed covering all chromosomes of wheat with the exception of 1D. Two QTL on chromosome 1B were associated with adult plant and seedling reaction and were the most significant QTL detected. Together these QTL reduced adult plant infection type from a score of seven to a score of two reduced disease severity by an average of 25% and provided protection against race PST-100, PST-114 and PST-127 in the seedling stage. The location of these QTL and the race specificity provided by them suggest that observed effects at this locus are due to a complementation of the previously known but defeated resistances of the cultivar Tres combining with that of Madsen (the two parent cultivars of Coda). Two additional QTL on chromosome 3B and one on 5B were associated with adult plant reaction only, and a single QTL on chromosome 5D was associated with seedling reaction to PST-114. Coda has been resistant to stripe rust since its release in 2000, indicating that combining multiple resistance genes for stripe rust provides durable resistance, especially when all-stage resistance genes are combined in a fashion to maximize the number of races they protect against. Identified molecular markers will allow for an efficient transfer of these genes into other cultivars, thereby continuing to provide excellent resistance to stripe rust. © 2014 Case et al. Source

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