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Erbil, Iraq

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Erbil, Iraq
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News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

Pixium Vision (Paris:PIX), a company developing innovative bionic vision systems with the intention to allow patients who have lost their sight to lead more independent lives, today announced the appointment of Didier Laurens as Chief Financial Officer (CFO). He joins the Company’s management team and lead company’s corporate financial and investor relations activities. Khalid Ishaque, CEO of Pixium Vision, commented: « We are delighted to welcome Didier Laurens to Pixium Vision as the company expands operations to commercial activities following CE mark for its first bionic vision system IRIS®II as well as progressing toward first human implant with PRIMA system. Following the departure of Pierre Kemula, who accompanied the company’s successful IPO enabling the company to pursue the development of 2 bionic retinal implant systems, Didier’s experience in finance and investor relations will strengthen and contribute to continued success through the next stages of the Company’s growth and positioning Pixium Vision as a leader in Bionic vision systems market.” Didier brings extensive finance and capital markets experience, most recently as Director Investor Relations, Financing and Treasury at Korian, where he also served as Interim CFO. Previously, he was Financial Analyst with Societe Generale covering various sectors including healthcare, where he accompanied numerous IPO’s. He also served as marketing manager in the pharmaceutical industry. Didier holds a post-graduate of Pharmacy, and is graduated from SFAF/CIIA. Didier Laurens commented: “Pixium Vision has established itself as a disruptive technology innovator in bionic vision space at the frontier of neuroscience, supported by a global multidisciplinary expertise and know-how and centers of excellence. I am delighted to join the team at Pixium Vision and look forward to contributing to the next stage of development and growth of the company and its success.” IRIS®II is a bionic vision system equipped with a bio-inspired camera and a 150 electrodes epi-retinal implant with a proprietary design intended to be explantable and eventually upgradable for patients who have lost sight due to Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP). The Company received CE mark for IRIS®II in 2016, enabling Pixium to launch its commercial activities subject to reimbursement availabilities. CE mark approval for IRIS®II system enables the company to file for national reimbursements. The Company is working initially with public reimbursement authorities for innovative technologies for medical devices in France (under “Forfait Innovation”) and in Germany (with NUB). Pixium Vision’s mission is to create a world of bionic vision for those who have lost their sight, enabling them to regain partial visual perception and greater autonomy. Pixium Vision’s bionic vision systems are associated with a surgical intervention as well as a rehabilitation period. The company is developing two bionic retinal implant systems. IRIS®II, the company first bionic system, obtained CE mark in July 2016. In parallel, Pixium Vision has recently completed the pre-clinical study phases for PRIMA, a sub-retinal miniaturized wireless photovoltaic implant platform, and is planning to initiate first-in-human trials. Pixium Vision collaborates closely with academic and research partners spanning across prestigious vision research institutions including the Institut de la Vision in Paris, the Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory at Stanford University, and Moorfields Eye Hospital in London. The company is EN ISO 13485 certified. For more information, please visit: www.pixium-vision.com; And follow us on: Twitter @PixiumVision; Facebook www.facebook.com/pixiumvision LinkedIn www.linkedin.com/company/pixium-vision Pixium Vision is listed on Euronext Paris (Compartment C). Pixium Vision shares are eligible for the French tax incentivized PEA-PME and FCPI investment vehicles. This press release may expressly or implicitly contain forward-looking statements relating to Pixium Vision and its activity. Such statements are related to known or unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that could lead actual results, financial conditions, performance or achievements to differ materially from Vision Pixium results, financial conditions, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward looking statements. Pixium Vision provides this press release as of the aforementioned date and does not commit to update forward looking statements contained herein, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. For a description of risks and uncertainties which could lead to discrepancies between actual results, financial condition, performance or achievements and those contained in the forward-looking statements, please refer to Chapter 4 "Risk Factors" of the company’s Registration Document filed with the AMF under number R16-033 on April 28, 2016 which can be found on the websites of the AMF - AMF (www.amf-france.org) and of Pixium Vision (www.pixium-vision.com).


News Article | October 26, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

In a paradigm shift from conventional electronic devices, exploiting the quantum properties of superlattices holds the promise of developing new technologies Researchers at the Nanoscale Transport Physics Laboratory from the School of Physics at the University of the Witwatersrand have found a technique to improve carbon superlattices for quantum electronic device applications. Superlattices are made up of alternating layers of very thin semiconductors, just a few nanometers thick. These layers are so thin that the physics of these devices is governed by quantum mechanics, where electrons behave like waves. In a paradigm shift from conventional electronic devices, exploiting the quantum properties of superlattices holds the promise of developing new technologies. The group, headed by Professor Somnath Bhattacharyya has been working for the past 10 years on developing carbon-based nano-electronic devices. "Carbon is the future in the electronics field and it soon will be challenging many other semiconductors, including silicon," says Bhattacharyya. The physics of carbon superlattices is more complex than that of crystalline superlattices (such as gallium arsenide), since the material is amorphous and carbon atoms tend to form chains and networks. The Wits group, in association with researchers at the University of Surrey in the UK, has developed a detailed theoretical approach to understand the experimental data obtained from carbon devices. The paper has been published in Scientific Reports (Nature Publishing Group) on 19 October. "This work provides an understanding of the fundamental quantum properties of carbon superlattices, which we can now use to design quantum devices for specific applications," says lead author, Wits PhD student, Ross McIntosh. "Our work provides strong impetus for future studies of the high-frequency electronic and optoelectronic properties of carbon superlattices". Through their work, the group reported one of the first theoretical models that can explain the fundamental electronic transport properties in disordered carbon superlattices. Bhattacharyya started looking at the use of carbon for semiconductor applications almost 10 years ago, before he joined Wits University, when he and co-authors from the University of Surrey developed and demonstrated negative differential resistance and excellent high-frequency properties of a quantum device made up of amorphous carbon layers. This work was published in Nature Materials in 2006. McIntosh undertook the opportunity at honours level to measure the electrical properties of carbon superlattice devices. Now, as a PhD student and having worked extensively with theoretician Dr. Mikhail V. Katkov, he has extended the theoretical framework and developed a technique to calculate the transport properties of these devices. Bhattacharyya believes this work will have immense importance in developing Carbon-based high-frequency devices. "It will open not only fundamental studies in Carbon materials, but it will also have industrial applications in the electronic and optoelectronic device sector," he says. Superlattices are currently used as state of the art high frequency oscillators and amplifiers and are beginning to find use in optoelectronics as detectors and emitters in the terahertz regime. While the high frequency electrical and optoelectronic properties of conventional semiconductors are limited by the dopants used to modify their electronic properties, the properties of superlattices can be tuned over a much wider range to create devices which operate in regimes where conventional devices cannot. Superlattice electronic devices can operate at higher frequencies and optoelectronic devices can operate at lower frequencies than their conventional counterparts. The lack of terahertz emitters and detectors has resulted in a gap in that region of the electromagnetic spectrum (known as the "terahertz gap"), which is a significant limitation, as many biological molecules are active in this regime. This also limits terahertz radio astronomy. Amorphous Carbon devices are extremely strong, can operate at high voltages and can be developed in most laboratories in the world, without sophisticated nano-fabrication facilities. New Carbon-based devices could find application in biology, space technology, science infrastructure such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) telescope in South Africa, and new microwave detectors. "What was lacking earlier was an understanding of device modelling. If we have a model, we can improve the device quality, and that is what we now have," says Bhattacharyya. The Wits Nanoscale Transport Physics Laboratory (NSTPL) was established in 2009 under the leadership of Bhattacharyya when Professor João Rodrigues was the Head of the School of Physics at the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa. The department is known as a leading Physics school in the African continent, having one of the largest academic staff complements on a single campus. Since the opening of the laboratory, the NSTPL has gone from strength to strength in establishing a facility that houses world class fabrication and measurement equipment, an initiative strongly supported by research entities such as the NRF, CSIR, Wits Research Office and DST/NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials. The NSTPL is well equipped with various sophisticated synthesis facilities, as well as a cryogenic micro-manipulated probe station to conduct sensitive quantum transport measurements at temperatures near absolute zero. The NSTPL also houses a fully operational electron beam lithography scanning electron microscope, used to fabricate nanoscale devices based on these carbon materials. Some noteworthy current projects include the fabrication of spintronic devices using supramolecular Gd-functionalized carbon nanotubes, the fabrication of graphene field effect transistors and most recently the study of the unconventional superconductivity observed in boron-doped diamond. The NSTPL group has also published a number of papers on theoretical investigations, led by Dr Mikhail Katkov and Dr Dmitry Churochkin, on the role of disorder on the quantum transport in carbon systems. These various topics form part of the broader direction the group has taken, that being, investigating the physics of carbon materials in the hopes of finding application in quantum information systems as well as detector devices valuable for space exploration.


News Article | November 2, 2016
Site: www.sciencenews.org

Scientists have lost their latest round of hide-and-seek with dark matter, but they’re not out of the game. Despite overwhelming evidence that an exotic form of matter lurks unseen in the cosmos, decades of searches have failed to definitively detect a single particle of dark matter. While some scientists continue down the road of increasingly larger detectors designed to catch the particles, others are beginning to consider a broader landscape of possibilities for what dark matter might be. “We’ve been looking where our best guess told us to look for all these years, and we’re starting to wonder if we maybe guessed wrong,” says theoretical astrophysicist Dan Hooper of Fermilab in Batavia, Ill. “People are just opening their minds to a wider range of options.” Dark matter permeates the cosmos: The material keeps galaxies from flying apart and has left its imprints in the oldest light in the universe, the cosmic microwave background, which dates back to just 380,000 years after the Big Bang. Indirect evidence from dark matter’s gravitational influences shows that it makes up the bulk of the mass in the universe. But scientists can’t pin down what dark matter is without detecting it directly. In new results published in August and September, three teams of scientists have come up empty-handed, finding no hints of dark matter. The trio of experiments searched for one particular variety of dark matter — hypothetical particles known as WIMPs, or weakly interacting massive particles, with a range of possible masses that starts at several times that of a proton. WIMPs, despite their name, are dark matter bigwigs — they have long been the favorite explanation for the universe’s missing mass. WIMPs are thought to interact with normal matter only via the weak nuclear force and gravity. Part of WIMPs’ appeal comes from a prominent but unverified theory, supersymmetry, which independently predicts such particles. Supersymmetry posits that each known elementary particle has a heavier partner; the lightest partner particle could be a dark matter WIMP. But evidence for supersymmetry hasn’t materialized in particle collisions at the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, so supersymmetry’s favored status is eroding (SN: 10/1/16, p. 12). Supersymmetry arguments for WIMPs are thus becoming shakier — especially since WIMPs aren’t showing up in detectors. Scientists typically search for WIMPs by looking for interactions with normal matter inside a detector. Several current experiments use tanks of liquefied xenon, an element found in trace amounts in Earth’s atmosphere, in hopes of detecting the tiny amounts of light and electric charge that would be released when a WIMP strikes a xenon nucleus and causes it to recoil. The three xenon experiments are the Large Underground Xenon, or LUX, experiment, located in the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, S.D.; the PandaX-II experiment, located in China’s JinPing underground laboratory in Sichuan; and the XENON100 experiment, located in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory in Italy. Teams of scientists at the three locations each reported no signs of dark matter particles. The experiments are most sensitive to particles with masses around 40 or 50 times that of a proton. Scientists can’t completely rule out WIMPs of these masses, but the interactions would have to be exceedingly rare. In initial searches, proponents of WIMPs expected that the particles would be easy to find. “It was thought to be like, ‘OK, we’ll run the detector for five minutes, discover dark matter, and we’re all done,’” says physicist Matthew Szydagis of the University at Albany in New York, a member of LUX. That has turned into decades of hard work. As WIMPs keep failing to turn up, some scientists are beginning to become less enamored with the particles and are considering other possibilities more closely. One alternative dark matter contender now attracting more attention is the axion. This particle was originally proposed decades ago as part of the solution to a particle physics quandary known as the strong CP problem — the question of why the strong nuclear force, which holds particles together inside the nucleus, treats matter and antimatter  equally. If dark matter consists of axions, the particle could therefore solve two problems at once. Axions are small fry as dark matter goes — they can be as tiny as a millionth of a billionth the mass of a WIMP. The particles interact so feebly that they are extremely difficult to detect. If axions are dark matter, “you’re sitting in an enormous, dense sea of axions and you don’t even notice them,” says physicist Leslie Rosenberg of the University of Washington in Seattle, the leader of the Axion Dark Matter eXperiment. After a recent upgrade to the experiment, ADMX scientists are searching for dark matter axions using a magnetic field and special equipment to coax the particles to convert into photons, which can then be detected. Although WIMPs and axions remain the front-runners, scientists are beginning to move beyond these two possibilities. In between the featherweight axions and hulking WIMPs lies a broad range of masses that hasn’t been well explored. Scientists’ favorite theories don’t predict dark matter particles with such intermediate masses, says theoretical physicist Kathryn Zurek of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California, but that doesn’t mean that dark matter couldn’t be found there. Zurek advocates a diverse search over a broad range of masses, instead of focusing on one particular theory. “Dark matter direct detection is not one-size-fits-all,” she says. In two papers published in Physical Review Letters on January 7 and September 14,  Zurek and colleagues proposed using superconductors — materials that allow electricity to flow without resistance — and superfluids, which allow fluids to flow without friction, to detect light dark matter particles. “We are trying to broaden as much as possible the tools to search for dark matter,” says Zurek. Likewise, scientists with the upcoming Super Cryogenic Dark Matter Search SNOLAB experiment, to be located in an underground lab in Sudbury, Canada, will use detectors made of germanium and silicon to search for dark matter with smaller masses than the xenon experiments can. Scientists have not given up on xenon WIMP experiments. Soon some of those experiments will be scaling up — going from hundreds of kilograms of liquid xenon to tons — to improve their chances of catching a dark matter particle on the fly. The next version of XENON100, the XENON1T experiment (pronounced “XENON one ton”) is nearly ready to begin taking data. LUX’s next generation experiment, known as LUX-ZEPLIN or LZ, is scheduled to begin in 2020. PandaX-II scientists are also planning a sequel. Physicists are still optimistic that these detectors will finally find the elusive particles. “Maybe we will have some opportunity to see something nobody has seen,” says Xiangdong Ji of Shanghai Jiao Tong University, the leader of PandaX-II. “That’s what’s so exciting.” In the sea of nondetections of dark matter, there is one glaring exception. For years, scientists with the DAMA/LIBRA experiment at Gran Sasso have claimed to see signs of dark matter, using crystals of sodium iodide. But other experiments have found no signs of DAMA’s dark matter. Many scientists believe that DAMA has been debunked. “I don't know what generates the weird signal that DAMA sees,” says Hooper. “That being said, I don't think it's likely that it’s dark matter.” But other experiments have not used the same technology as DAMA, says theoretical astrophysicist Katherine Freese of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. “There is no alternative explanation that anybody can think of, so that is why it is actually still very interesting.” Three upcoming experiments should soon close the door on the mystery, by searching for dark matter using sodium iodide, as DAMA does: the ANAIS experiment in the Canfranc Underground Laboratory in Spain, the COSINE-100 experiment at YangYang Underground Laboratory in South Korea, and the SABRE experiment, planned for the Stawell Underground Physics Laboratory in Australia. Scientists’ efforts could still end up being for naught; dark matter may not be directly detectable at all. “It’s possible that gravity is the only lens with which we can view dark matter,” says Szydagis. Dark matter could interact only via gravity, not via the weak force or any other force. Or it could live in its own “hidden sector” of particles that interact among themselves, but mostly shun normal matter. Even if no particles are detected anytime soon, most scientists remain convinced that an unseen form of matter exists. No alternative theory can explain all of scientists’ cosmological observations. “The human being is not going to give up for a long, long time to try to search for dark matter, because it’s such a big problem for us,” says Ji.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

Pixium Vision (Paris:PIX), a company developing innovative bionic vision systems with the intention to enable patients who have lost their sight to lead more independent lives, announces the first implantation and activation of IRIS® II in Spain. This implantation is part of Pixium Vision’s ongoing multi-centre clinical trial to assess the performance of IRIS® II which is supposed to provide a treatment to compensate for blindness. The 150 electrode epi-retinal implant is intended for patients who have lost their sight as a result of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). This marks the first implant of IRIS® II in Spain, a procedure performed by Prof. Borja Corcostegui, Founder and Medical Director of the Institute of Ocular Microsurgery (IMO). Dr. Borja is a vitroretinal surgeon, and the trial’s principal investigator in Spain. The IMO is one of the clinical centres participating in the multicentre European study across France, Germany and Austria, UK and Spain. IMO is a renowned ophthalmology centre dedicated to the treatment of ocular diseases and the correction of vision. Prof. Corcostegui commented: “This IRIS® II retinal implant was completed for a 75 year old RP patient for the first time in Spain. The 150 electrode implant, with a design intended to be explantable, is an innovative option for retinal surgeons.” He added: “The patient’s system was activated and he reported first perception of light. Per clinical protocol, the patient will now enter training and re-education which is supposed to help with the necessary learning how to interpret these new light signals.” After the activation and first light perception, some visual perception may become available. Now, the normal re-adaptation and re-education process follows where, per protocol, the patient shall enter a learning process which is supposed to help interpreting the new, artificial form of bionic vision. This artificial form of bionic vision is very different to the natural form of vision and still has to be evaluated. Khalid Ishaque, CEO of Pixium, added: "The first IRIS® II implant in Spain supports the company’s mission to expand a presence across centres of excellence in Europe. Pixium Vision’s mission is dedicated to the research, development and commercialization of bionic vision systems for patients who have lost sight to retinal dystrophies.” In parallel, the company continues the development of its second system, PRIMA, a tiny wireless sub-retinal implant. After first preclinical studies, an application for a feasibility study was submitted to regulatory bodies. IMO (Institute of Ocular Microsurgery) is committed to medical excellence with the objective of providing best service to the patient. For over 25 years, the Institute has sought to find solutions to all ocular disorders through the expert application of innovative technology and techniques. On-going training and research, participating actively in clinical trials, enable IMO to develop new therapeutic opportunities for the diagnostic and treatment of eye problems. Its new premises, inaugurated in 2009 and boasting 70 consulting rooms and 8 operating theatres in an area of 22.000 square meters, have allowed IMO to become one of the biggest and most advanced centers in Europe. However, its hallmark is the medical team, led by 20 ophthalmologists sub-specialized in each part of the eye and the related pathologies. http://www.imo.es/en/ . IRIS®II is a bionic vision system equipped with a bio-inspired camera and a 150 electrodes epi-retinal implant with a proprietary design intended to be explantable and eventually upgradable for patients who have lost sight due to Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP). The Company received CE mark for IRIS®II at the end of July 2016, enabling Pixium to launch its commercial activities subject to reimbursement availabilities. CE mark approval for IRIS®II system enables the company to file for national reimbursements. The Company is working initially with public reimbursement authorities for innovative technologies for medical devices in France (under “Forfait Innovation”) and in Germany (with NUB). The study referenced NCT02670980 (https://www.clinicaltrials.gov) evaluates performance and safety of IRIS®II in 10 patients suffering from retinitis pigmentosa, Usher Syndrome, Cone-Rod dystrophy, choroideremia will be included and followed for a minimum of 18 months, with additional 18 months follow-up, subject to patient consent. The IRIS®II clinical trial, initiated in January 2016, is a multi-centric, open label, non-randomized prospective European study to assess effectiveness of the IRIS®II bionic vision system as treatment intended to compensate for blindness, by eventually providing a form of perception for blind persons and enabling them greater autonomy and quality of living. The trial is conducted in prestigious ophthalmology centers in France, the UK, Spain, Austria and Germany. http://www.pixium-vision.com/en/clinical-trial/participating-centers Pixium Vision’s mission is to create a world of bionic vision for those who have lost their sight, enabling them to regain partial visual perception and greater autonomy. Pixium Vision’s bionic vision systems are associated with a surgical intervention as well as a rehabilitation period. The company is developing two bionic retinal implant systems. IRIS®II, the company’s first bionic system, obtained CE mark in July 2016. In parallel, Pixium Vision has recently completed the pre-clinical study phases for PRIMA, a sub-retinal miniaturized wireless photovoltaic implant platform, and is planning to initiate first-in-human trials. Pixium Vision collaborates closely with academic and research partners spanning across prestigious vision research institutions including the Institut de la Vision in Paris, the Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory at Stanford University, and Moorfields Eye Hospital in London. The company is EN ISO 13485 certified. For more information, please visit: www.pixium-vision.com; Pixium Vision is listed on Euronext (Compartment C) in Paris ISIN: FR0011950641; Mnemo: PIX IRIS® is a trademark of Pixium-Vision SA Pixium Vision shares are eligible for the French tax incentivized PEA-PME and FCPI investment vehicles. This press release may expressly or implicitly contain forward-looking statements relating to Pixium Vision and its activity. Such statements are related to known or unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that could lead actual results, financial conditions, performance or achievements to differ materially from Vision Pixium results, financial conditions, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward looking statements. Pixium Vision provides this press release as of the aforementioned date and does not commit to update forward looking statements contained herein, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. For a description of risks and uncertainties which could lead to discrepancies between actual results, financial condition, performance or achievements and those contained in the forward-looking statements, please refer to Chapter 4 "Risk Factors" of the company’s Registration Document filed with the AMF under number R16-033 on April 28, 2016 which can be found on the websites of the AMF - AMF (www.amf-france.org) and of Pixium Vision (www.pixium-vision.com).


Pixium Vision (Paris:PIX), a company developing innovative bionic vision systems with the intention to allow patients who have lost their sight to lead more independent lives, today announced that the German Institute for the Hospital Remuneration System (InEK) has granted NUB (Neue Untersuchungs- und Behandlungsmethoden) Status-1 for IRIS®II, Pixium Vision’s first bionic vision system, equipped with a bio-inspired camera and a 150 electrodes epi-retinal implant with a proprietary design intended to be explantable and upgradable. The NUB process allows negotiations between hospitals and statutory health insurances on the potential reimbursement of new medical treatments in the German statutory health insurance system (detailed information on the NUB process and Status is available at http://www.g-drg.de/G-DRG-System_2017/Neue_Untersuchungs-_und_Behandlungsmethoden_NUB). Based on NUB Status-1 for IRIS® II, ophthalmic hospitals can negotiate reimbursement coverage under the German statutory health insurance system for IRIS®II treatment for patients with advanced outer retinal degeneration due to Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP). A NUB decision is valid for one year and can be renewed annually. Khalid Ishaque, Chief Executive Officer of Pixium Vision said: “After having received the CE mark for IRIS®II, obtaining market access and reimbursement has been the main focus as we continue on our mission towards innovative treatment options. We intend to progressively expand availability across Germany as well as other regions. Obtaining the NUB Status-1 supports our ongoing efforts to bring innovations in bionic vision capabilities to patients blinded by retinal dystrophies.” The clinical centers offering IRIS®II initially include ophthalmic hospitals at the following university clinics: IRIS®II is a bionic vision system equipped with a bio-inspired camera and a 150 electrodes epi-retinal implant with a proprietary design intended to be explantable and eventually upgradable for patients who have lost sight due to Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP). The Company received CE mark for IRIS®II in 2016, enabling Pixium to launch its commercial activities subject to reimbursement availabilities. CE mark approval for IRIS®II system enables the company to file for national reimbursements. The Company is working initially with public reimbursement authorities for innovative technologies for medical devices in France (under “Forfait Innovation”) and in Germany (with NUB). Pixium Vision’s mission is to create a world of bionic vision for those who have lost their sight, enabling them to regain partial visual perception and greater autonomy. Pixium Vision’s bionic vision systems are associated with a surgical intervention as well as a rehabilitation period. The company is developing two bionic retinal implant systems. IRIS®II, the company first bionic system, obtained CE mark in July 2016. In parallel, Pixium Vision has recently completed the pre-clinical study phases for PRIMA, a sub-retinal miniaturized wireless photovoltaic implant platform, and is planning to initiate first-in-human trials. Pixium Vision collaborates closely with academic and research partners spanning across prestigious vision research institutions including the Institut de la Vision in Paris, the Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory at Stanford University, and Moorfields Eye Hospital in London. The company is EN ISO 13485 certified. For more information, please visit: www.pixium-vision.com; Pixium Vision is listed on Euronext Paris (Compartment C). Pixium Vision shares are eligible for the French tax incentivized PEA-PME and FCPI investment vehicles. This press release may expressly or implicitly contain forward-looking statements relating to Pixium Vision and its activity. Such statements are related to known or unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that could lead actual results, financial conditions, performance or achievements to differ materially from Vision Pixium results, financial conditions, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward looking statements. Pixium Vision provides this press release as of the aforementioned date and does not commit to update forward looking statements contained herein, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. For a description of risks and uncertainties which could lead to discrepancies between actual results, financial condition, performance or achievements and those contained in the forward-looking statements, please refer to Chapter 4 "Risk Factors" of the company’s Registration Document filed with the AMF under number R16-033 on April 28, 2016 which can be found on the websites of the AMF - AMF (www.amf-france.org) and of Pixium Vision (www.pixium-vision.com).


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

SALT LAKE CITY, UT--(Marketwired - Feb 27, 2017) - Amedica Corporation ( : AMDA), an innovative biomaterial company which develops and manufactures silicon nitride as a platform for biomedical applications, announced today that Researchers from the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery of Tokyo Medical University (Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan) led by Professor Kengo Yamamoto MD PhD recently completed a five million cycle (Mc) comparative hip simulator study examining the wear behavior of an advanced highly cross-linked and vitamin E stabilized polyethylene (E1® Zimmer-Biomet, Warsaw, IN, USA) against two different types of ceramic femoral heads -- MC2®silicon nitride (Amedica Corporation, Salt Lake City, UT, USA) and BIOLOX®delta (CeramTec, Plochingen, Germany). BIOLOX®delta is currently considered the "gold standard" for ceramic femoral head materials. While the polyethylene wear loss induced by both types of ceramic heads was extremely small (< 0.60 mg/Mc), mean wear associated with MC2®silicon nitride heads was approximately 15% lower than the BIOLOX®delta components. This independent wear study was conducted in accordance with international standards at the Medical Technology Laboratory of the Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute (Bologna, Italy) by Professor Aldo Toni MD under the supervision of Dr. Saverio Affatato PhD (Rizzoli Institute) with consultation and support from Professor Giuseppe Pezzotti PhD (Ceramic Physics Laboratory, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto Japan). Amedica and Zimmer-Biomet (Tokyo Office) provided the femoral heads and acetabular liners; however, neither company actively sponsored the research. The testing was independently conceived by Professors Yamamoto and Pezzotti, and funded by the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery of Tokyo Medical University. This is the first reported improvement in polyethylene wear performance by a ceramic other than BIOLOX®delta; and it is part of a series of planned comparative wear tests that will culminate at 12 Mc. Further details of this interim hip simulation test will be provided in a joint publication planned for release in a scientific journal. "We are thrilled, though not surprised, at the remarkable wear properties of silicon nitride femoral heads," said Dr. B. Sonny Bal, CEO and President of Amedica Corporation. "Our previous work, already published in peer-review forums, has shown superb phase stability of silicon nitride in vivo, plus oxygen-scavenging properties that may confer long-term protection to polyethylene acetabular liners, along with bacterial resistance inherent in silicon nitride, toughness that is superior to any other biomaterial, and resistance to corrosion. The present wear data reflect the considerable scientific work that went into a thorough understanding of the surface chemistry and composition of our femoral heads, with development of engineering processes and proprietary methods that lead to a consistent, ultra-smooth articulating surface. Taken together, this favorable combination of properties, supported by scientific data, reflect material science advancements that are necessary to differentiate total hip replacements in an otherwise commoditized market, and more importantly, toward extending the longevity of hip replacements beyond the second decade of life, post-implantation. These data will contribute to our continuing work and dialogue with the FDA to get the product approved for use clinically." About Amedica Corporation Amedica is focused on the development and application of medical-grade silicon nitride ceramics. Amedica markets spinal fusion products and is developing a new generation of wear- and corrosion-resistant implant components for hip and knee arthroplasty. The Company manufactures its products in its ISO 13485 certified manufacturing facility and, through its partnership with Kyocera, the world's largest ceramic manufacturer. Amedica's spine products are FDA-cleared, CE-marked, and are currently marketed in the U.S. and select markets in Europe and South America through its distributor network and its OEM partnerships. For more information on Amedica or its silicon nitride material platform, please visit www.amedica.com. Forward-Looking Statements This press release contains statements that constitute forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Securities Act of 1933 and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These statements are based upon our current expectations and speak only as of the date hereof. Our actual results may differ materially and adversely from those expressed in any forward-looking statements as a result of various factors and uncertainties. For example, there can be no assurance that we will be able to maintain our listing on any NASDAQ market. Other factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those contemplated within this press release can also be found in Amedica's Risk Factors disclosure in its Annual Report on Form 10-K, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) on March 23, 2016, and in Amedica's other filings with the SEC. Forward-looking statements contained in this press release speak only as of the date of this press release. We undertake no obligation to update any forward-looking statements as a result of new information, events or circumstances or other factors arising or coming to our attention after the date hereof.


News Article | November 15, 2016
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Penn State University astronomers have discovered that the mysterious "cosmic whistles" known as fast radio bursts can pack a serious punch, in some cases releasing a billion times more energy in gamma-rays than they do in radio waves and rivaling the stellar cataclysms known as supernovae in their explosive power. The discovery, the first-ever finding of non-radio emission from any fast radio burst, drastically raises the stakes for models of fast radio bursts and is expected to further energize efforts by astronomers to chase down and identify long-lived counterparts to fast radio bursts using X-ray, optical, and radio telescopes. Fast radio bursts, which astronomers refer to as FRBs, were first discovered in 2007, and in the years since radio astronomers have detected a few dozen of these events. Although they last mere milliseconds at any single frequency, their great distances from Earth -- and large quantities of intervening plasma -- delay their arrival at lower frequencies, spreading the signal out over a second or more and yielding a distinctive downward-swooping "whistle" across the typical radio receiver band. "This discovery revolutionizes our picture of FRBs, some of which apparently manifest as both a whistle and a bang," said coauthor Derek Fox, a Penn State professor of astronomy and astrophysics. The radio whistle can be detected by ground-based radio telescopes, while the gamma-ray bang can be picked up by high-energy satellites like NASA's Swift mission. "Rate and distance estimates for FRBs suggest that, whatever they are, they are a relatively common phenomenon, occurring somewhere in the universe more than 2,000 times a day." Efforts to identify FRB counterparts began soon after their discovery but have all come up empty until now. In a paper published November 11 in Astrophysical Journal Letters the Penn State team, led by physics graduate student James DeLaunay, reports bright gamma-ray emission from the fast radio burst FRB 131104, named after the date it occurred, November 4, 2013. "I started this search for FRB counterparts without expecting to find anything," said DeLaunay. "This burst was the first that even had useful data to analyze. When I saw that it showed a possible gamma-ray counterpart, I couldn't believe my luck!" Discovery of the gamma-ray "bang" from FRB 131104, the first non-radio counterpart to any FRB, was made possible by NASA's Earth-orbiting Swift satellite, which was observing the exact part of the sky where FRB 131104 occurred as the burst was detected by the Parkes Observatory radio telescope in Parkes, Australia. "Swift is always watching the sky for bursts of X-rays and gamma-rays," said Neil Gehrels, the mission's Principal Investigator and chief of the Astroparticle Physics Laboratory at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. "What a delight it was to catch this flash from one of the mysterious fast radio bursts." "Although theorists had anticipated that FRBs might be accompanied by gamma rays, the gamma-ray emission we see from FRB 131104 is surprisingly long-lasting and bright," Fox said. The duration of the gamma-ray emission, at two to six minutes, is many times the millisecond duration of the radio emission. And the gamma-ray emission from FRB 131104 outshines its radio emissions by more than a billion times, dramatically raising estimates of the burst's energy requirements and suggesting severe consequences for the burst's surroundings and host galaxy. Two common models for gamma-ray emission from FRBs exist: one invoking magnetic flare events from magnetars -- highly magnetized neutron stars that are the dense remnants of collapsed stars -- and another invoking the catastrophic merger of two neutron stars, colliding to form a black hole. According to coauthor Kohta Murase, a Penn State professor and theorist, "The energy release we see is challenging for the magnetar model unless the burst is relatively nearby. The long timescale of the gamma-ray emission, while unexpected in both models, might be possible in a merger event if we observe the merger from the side, in an off-axis scenario." "In fact, the energy and timescale of the gamma-ray emission is a better match to some types of supernovae, or to some of the supermassive black hole accretion events that Swift has seen," Fox said. "The problem is that no existing models predict that we would see an FRB in these cases." The bright gamma-ray emission from FRB 131104 suggests that the burst, and others like it, might be accompanied by long-lived X-ray, optical, or radio emissions. Such counterparts are dependably seen in the wake of comparably energetic cosmic explosions, including both stellar-scale cataclysms -- supernovae, magnetar flares, and gamma-ray bursts -- and episodic or continuous accretion activity of the supermassive black holes that commonly lurk in the centers of galaxies. In fact, Swift X-ray and optical observations were carried out two days after FRB 131104, thanks to prompt analysis by radio astronomers (who were not aware of the gamma-ray counterpart) and a nimble response from the Swift mission operations team, headquartered at Penn State. In spite of this relatively well-coordinated response, no long-lived X-ray, ultraviolet, or optical counterpart was seen. The authors hope to participate in future campaigns aimed at discovering more FRB counterparts, and in this way, finally revealing the sources responsible for these ubiquitous and mysterious events. "Ideally, these campaigns would begin soon after the burst and would continue for several weeks afterward to make sure nothing gets missed. Maybe we'll get even luckier next time," DeLaunay said.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.newscientist.com

Dark matter has just suffered another blow. Only one experiment claims to have seen signs of the mysterious stuff, and now the massive XENON100 experiment has failed to find any evidence for that signal. This may put the controversial signal to rest once and for all – but some say it’s not that simple. Dark matter is a mysterious substance that makes up roughly 23 per cent of our universe. We know it’s there because of the gravitational force it exerts on normal matter, but it’s devilishly difficult to detect. Myriad experiments have been trying to do just that, most buried deep underground to block out troublesome cosmic rays. But while there have been a few tantalising hints here and there, nothing has reached the threshold required to count as detection – with one exception. In 1998, scientists at the DAMA experiment buried deep in Italy’s Gran Sasso mountain claimed to have detected dark matter in the form of a weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) weighing around 10 gigaelectronvolts (GeV). The rate of recorded blips as particles collide with the nuclei of the detector material varied with the seasons. The DAMA scientists attributed this to the Earth moving through a “wind” of dark matter as it orbits the sun. DAMA’s signal was unmistakable, but many physicists argued that other factors besides dark matter could explain it. It didn’t help that the DAMA team refused to share their data publicly or collaborate with other researchers, making it more difficult to test those claims. For years, other experiments tried and failed to find a dark matter particle in DAMA’s reported mass range – including the original XENON10 experiment, an earlier, less-sensitive version of XENON100 also located in the Gran Sasso mountain. But in 2011, an experiment called CoGeNT, designed specifically to disprove the DAMA claims, backfired when preliminary results appeared to confirm the claims instead. It was just a hint of a signal, and it disappeared with more data. But it kept the debate alive. An upgraded CoGeNT experiment has been taking new data for the last year, and will publish those results later this year, says Juan Collar at the University of Chicago. Now the upgraded XENON100 experiment is putting more weight on the sceptical side. The team reports that with four full years of data, they see no evidence for an annual modulation. Add to this the fact that the upgraded DAMA experiment hasn’t announced any new findings since it started taking data in 2013, and the outlook starts to seem a bit grim for DAMA. “Even after one year of data, they should know,” says Laura Baudis at the University of Zurich, Switzerland, a member of XENON100. So does this mean it’s all over but the crying for the controversial claim? Not necessarily. “It’s tough to prove a negative,” says Neal Weiner at New York University. But the latest XENON100 result does rule out a set of particularly unconventional dark matter models that could have explained the DAMA signal, further constraining the probable scenarios. “This is closing that generic explanation pretty well,” he says. “But it’s not 100 per cent definitive.” The most obvious remaining loophole is that DAMA uses a sodium iodide detector, while XENON100 uses xenon. It’s possible that dark matter could interact differently with different materials. “There won’t be a resolution until a sodium iodide detector tries and fails or succeeds to see the same effect,” Collar says. Such an experiment, called SABRE, is already in the works at the Stawell Underground Physics Laboratory (SUPL) in Victoria, Australia. It’s an exact replica of DAMA, so it could settle the question when its first results are released later this year. Baudis admits that if she were a member of the DAMA collaboration, she might be getting worried about now. But she’s not worried about the overall prospects for detecting dark matter, even though two other dark matter experiments – LUX in South Dakota and PandaX-II in China – also reported no signs of WIMPs this week. Dark matter detectors are still quite small, Baudis says. The next XENON upgrade will have a whopping 3.3 tonnes of liquid xenon, an order of magnitude improvement. “For me, it would have been a big surprise [to] find dark matter with these small detectors,” she says. “So I don’t lose hope.”


News Article | November 10, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Dr. Colleen Hartman and Dr. Holly Gilbert of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, recently received awards for their contributions to the aerospace community. Women in Aerospace (WIA) presented the awards at a ceremony on Oct. 13 in Arlington, Virginia. "Working with the scientists, engineers, and support personnel at NASA and our aerospace partners continues to inspire the world to understand the physics of our Earth, our solar system and our Universe," Hartman said. "It is such an honor to have participated over the last thirty years and help inspiring the next generation. WIA is committed to partnering with space explorers and I am humbled with this award." WIA selected Hartman for the 2016 Leadership Award. Hartman is currently the Director of the Science and Exploration Directorate, leading 2,500 scientists, engineers and support personnel at Goddard. Hartman started her career in 1980 as a Presidential Management Intern and has held a variety of senior positions, including acting Associate Administrator of the Science Mission Directorate (SMD), Deputy Assistant Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Division Director of Solar System Exploration (SMD), Deputy Director of Technology (SMD), and Deputy Associate Administrator (SMD). She also gained administration and congressional approval for an entirely new class of funded missions that are competitively selected called "New Frontiers," to explore the planets, asteroids and comets in our solar system. The Leadership Award is given to those who demonstrate exemplary leadership abilities that enable others to succeed in the aerospace field and show leadership of noteworthy contributions to the aerospace field on a single project over several years or during a career. It also recognizes commitment to professional growth and service as a role model or mentor that shows dedication to the advancement of women in aerospace. Gilbert received the Aerospace Awareness Award. Gilbert has been the deputy director of the Heliophysics Science Division (HSD) at Goddard since 2015, and she was chief of the Solar Physics Laboratory in HSD from September 2011 until July 2015. "Getting the public excited about the amazing work we do at Goddard is one of the most rewarding parts of my job, and it is particularly special when I can inspire the next generation of women!" said Gilbert. "It's an honor to be recognized for that work by WIA." Gilbert was selected for this award for her excellence in outreach and building public awareness of aerospace programs and developments. Innovative approaches to increasing public understanding of aerospace development and activities. Commitment to advancing and defining the roles that aerospace plays in all aspects of society. Commitment to professional growth. Service as a role model or mentor that shows dedication to the advancement of women in aerospace. WIA is dedicated to increasing the leadership capabilities and visibility of women in the aerospace community. They acknowledge and promote innovative individuals who strive to advance the aerospace industry as a whole. Their membership, comprised of both women and men, share a passion for a broad spectrum of aerospace issues. These include human space flight, aviation, remote sensing, satellite communications, robotic space exploration and the policy issues surrounding these fields, among others. For more information Women in Aerospace, visit: For more information about Hartman, visit: For more information about Gilbert, visit:


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.technologyreview.com

The companies, GenSight Biologics of Paris and Bionic Sight, a startup out of Weill Cornell Medical College in New York, both say a combination of wearable electronics and gene therapy has a chance to restore vision by re-creating the retina’s ability to sense light. Both companies are aiming to help patients with a degenerative eye disease called retinitis pigmentosa, which destroys light-sensing cells in the retina. If the approach works, it could in theory be used to treat any type of retinal disease that involves the loss of these cells, called photoreceptors. Optogenetics, a form of gene therapy, offers an unconventional but potentially powerful way to bypass damaged photoreceptors. Using the technique, scientists add genetic instructions to a different type of retinal cells, ganglions, so that they become light-sensitive instead. Working with the Institut de la Vision in Paris, GenSight has developed a pair of goggles containing a camera, a mircroprocessor, and a digital micromirror that will convert images the camera captures into bright pulses of red light in order to stimulate the modified cells. When tested in blind monkeys and rats, the technology appeared to restore their ability to see, says GenSight CEO Bernard Gilly, but only a test in human volunteers who are able to describe what they perceive after being treated will be definitive. He expects a human study to start this year. The companies are also closely tracking results from an initial human test of optogenetics carried out last March in Texas. In a trial being led by RetroSense Therapeutics, recently acquired by Allergan, a blind woman became first person to receive an optogenetic treatment to help restore her vision. That study has so far enrolled four patients, according to David Birch of the Retina Foundation of the Southwest, where the trial is taking place. Each patient gets three injections into the eye of an engineered virus carrying a gene from algae, which instructs cells to make the light-sensitive protein. The team hasn’t yet reported its results, so it’s unknown whether the subjects have gotten any of their vision back. The RetroSense study relies on natural light to activate the cells. That could limit the treatment’s effectiveness, because the light-sensing proteins only respond to specific wavelengths of light, and low levels of ambient or natural light may not be bright enough to trigger them. Richard Masland, an ophthalmology professor at Harvard Medical School and a scientific advisor for RetroSense, says that is why companies are looking into goggles or other “light adaptation machinery” as way to beam light of the right wavelengths and intensity into the eye. Also pursuing a combination of goggles and optogenetics is Bionic Sight, a startup founded by Sheila Nirenberg, a neuroscientist at Weill Cornell Medical College. The company said in January that it would partner with the gene-therapy company Applied Genetic Technologies to begin clinical trials by 2018. It’s still unclear what sort of vision will result from stimulating the ganglion cells, as these cells normally act to relay nerve impulses and don’t receive light directly. Nirenberg says her goggles will convert light into a “neural code,” or a pattern of pre-processed pulses, which will look to the ganglion cells as if they are coming from other cells in the retina. Daniel Palanker, an ophthalmology professor and director of the Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory at Stanford University, is skeptical that Nirenberg’s neural code will help. That’s because there are around 30 types of retinal ganglion cells, some of which respond to light while some respond to motion and some to differences in contrast. No one set of light patterns would be able to communicate with all of them, he says.

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