Torrance, CA, United States
Torrance, CA, United States

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Patent
Physical Optics Corp. | Date: 2016-09-02

A photodetector assembly for ultraviolet and far-ultraviolet detection includes an anode, a microchannel plate with an array of multichannel walls, and a photocathode layer disposed on the microchannel plate. Additionally, the photocathode may include nanowires deposited on a top surface of the array of multichannel walls.


Patent
Physical Optics Corp. | Date: 2017-01-18

A tunable band pass filtering for Tunable RF Anti-Jamming Systems is provided. Such embodiments include a first bandpass filter tunable to a first frequency band and a second bandpass filter coupled to the first bandpass filter and tunable to a second frequency band. In addition, a plurality of tunable passive components may be adapted to tune the first and second bandpass filters to the first and second frequency bands, respectively, thereby creating a multiband pass band signal to include the first and second frequency bands and attentuating frequency bands adjacent to the first and second frequency bands.


Patent
Physical Optics Corp. | Date: 2017-02-24

A non-transitory computer readable medium for storing one or more sequences of one or more instructions for execution by one or more processors in a processing system to perform a method for determining a dichotomy for a parametric decision process, the instructions when executed by the one or more processors are presented. Embodiments can be configured to define a network having a plurality of members as inter-member coherency coupling represented by elements of a coherency matrix, wherein for each i^(th )member the network includes an intensity value, I_(i). Further embodiments may include determining non-diagonal elements T_(ij )of the coherency matrix in which ij and in which i and j represent i^(th )and j^(th )members of the network, and constructing diagonal kernels K_(i )or non-diagonal kernels H_(i )based on the non-diagonal elements T_(ij )of the coherency matrix and intensity values (I_(i)) of the members.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Special Operations Command | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.50M | Year: 2015

This system will provide smaller, higher power efficiency and lighter than current weather sensors. The system will weight no more than 90 grams and be able to measure temperature, dew point, pressure altitude, barometric pressure, density altitude, wind velocity, wind direction, cloud height, and visibility. The system will be as accurate as current larger fielded systems but packaged small enough to fly on micro UAS or hand held modes. Data output will be compliant with user defined XML and graphical user interface will be defined by the user community to enable human overrides to the data for increased accuracy. The system will be powered off of low power DC power sources that are suitable for field and tactical use.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 748.61K | Year: 2016

Physical Optics Corporation (POC) proposes to continue the development of a novel Embedded Multifunctional Optical Sensor (EMOS) System. The EMOS addresses NASA?s need for in situ sensor systems for use on rigid and/or flexible ablative thermal protection system (TPS) materials to measure multiple TPS structural, aerothermal, and aerodynamic response parameters including temperature, heat flux, and pressure. EMOS is based on use of novel materials for high-temperature operation and uniquely designed fiber optic microsensors. The EMOS system is capable of simultaneously measuring multiple TPS response parameters (e.g., pressure, temperature, and heat flux) using a suite of miniature (diameter 1500 degrees C and measurement errors within 0.4% for temperature sensors, 0.2% for pressure sensors, and 20% for heat flux measurement. The outcome of the Phase I EMOS program was the successful feasibility demonstration of the proposed EMOS technology, capable of operating at temperatures at >1500 degrees C. At the end of Phase II, POC will perform a technology readiness level (TRL)-6 demonstration of the EMOS at POC or at NASA facilities, and will deliver to NASA a fully operational EMOS system prototype.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 750.00K | Year: 2016

To address NASA's need for compact optical isolators, Physical Optics Corporation (POC) proposes to continue the development of a new Miniature Optical Isolator (MOI). The novel optical isolator design is based on enhanced magneto-optical (MO) effects in magnetic photonic crystals. The innovation in the technology is its capacity to engineer MO effects not only by choosing the right material but also by adjusting the lattice parameters of 1 dimensional photonic crystals. While occupying a very small volume (~0.1 cm^3), a MOI device will achieve high optical transmission (2 dB or less forward loss) and excellent optical isolation (40 dB) at target wavelengths at a low cost. Therefore, the MOI technology directly addresses NASA's requirements for a compact, robust optical isolator for applications in cold atom systems. In Phase I, POC demonstrated the feasibility of the MOI technology through modeling and analysis, as well as fabrication of a proof-of-concept prototype with basic performance parameters characterized. In Phase II, POC will further optimize the device and fabricate prototypes for validation of key performance metrics, as well as evaluate life cycle and environmental performance.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 225.00K | Year: 2016

Development of miniaturized spectroradiometers for quantifying terrestrial ecosystems with unmanned aerial systems is being sought. Specifically, for routine use as field instrument, the development of miniaturized lightweight, affordable, and durable spectroradiometers with high spatial and spectral resolution over a broad wavelength range (350-2500 nm) is needed for integration with unmanned aerial vehicles. To address this need, a novel high resolution multiband miniature imaging spectroradiometer specifically tailored for unmanned aerial system platforms is proposed, based on an innovative planar spectrometer design that integrates multiple-spectral bands from ultraviolet to infrared (350-2500 nm) allowing high-spectral resolution (


Grant
Agency: Department of Agriculture | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 600.00K | Year: 2016

Approximately 47.8 million episodes of foodborne illnesses (to one in six Americans), occur each year and result in roughly 128,000 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths in the U.S. Approximately half of the reported foodborne illnesses occur in children, with the majority occurring in children under 15 years of age. The development of reliable and effective methods to detect foodborne hazards (pathogens, microorganisms, chemicals, toxins) is therefore of paramount importance. To address the USDA's need for a field-ready device to rapidly detect foodborne hazards on site during pre- and post-harvest processing and distribution, Physical Optics Corporation (POC) proposes to continue the development of a novel rapid Foodborne Illness Detection (FOBID) system based on POC's established sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and lab-on-a-chip technologies. The use of microfluidic chips to perform ELISA allows reagent volumes of <1 mL and assay times of <60 min, leading to a significant reduction of reagent-associated costs and technician-hours typically required for the time-consuming laboratory-based testing. Importantly, the early knowledge about a food's condition can stop the tainted food from reaching the public, thus ensuring more efficient processing and a healthier food supply. The new FOBID system design allows for quantitative identification, agnostic sample preparation, process automation with little training, multiplex assay capability, and high portability. In Phase I, POC demonstrated FOBID feasibility by assembling a benchtop prototype and detecting and identifying two selected pathogens. Phase II will be devoted to developing a commercially viable FOBID system, demonstrating the assembled portable prototype for rapid and easy-to-use foodborne pathogen detection. We will extend the capabilities demonstrated in Phase I by enhancing accuracy, sensitivity, and the preconcentration process; reducing costs; improving configurability for customizable assays; and automating the system. We will also focus on thorough evaluation of FOBID's ability to detect and identify multiple foodborne pathogens spiked into various types of food matrices to mimic realistic situations. Its ease of use and applicability to practical situations will be evaluated with input from end users in the food value chain, such as producers, processors, and distributors.The overall goal of the proposed effort is to develop and demonstrate the capability of the FOBID system to rapidly identify targeted microbial pathogens/toxins in a format that is compatible with on-site detection in pre- and postharvest processing and distribution environments. The following specific objectives have been established to reach this goal: (1) Refinement of the FOBID system; (2) Optimization of the FOBID assays; (3) Assembly of the FOBID prototype; (4) Demonstration of FOBID performance in efficient pathogen identification; and (5) Definition of the commercial market for FOBID technology.With the fully developed FOBID, we anticipate that the nation will have a cost-effective and efficient platform for rapid on-site identification of microbial pathogens and biological toxins in food, water, or environmental samples. While such capability is essential to those involved in the food value chain, including producers, aggregators/processors, distributors, food service and retailers, and service providers of food testing, it can also be implemented by the local, state, and federal agencies, such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for easy monitoring and control of food illness outbreaks.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.50M | Year: 2016

Limitations of the existing nuclear grade SiC composites as applied to high-performance nuclear systems include difficulty joining complex geometries and instability of those joints under irradiation, poor initial thermal conductivity and significant conductivity degradation after irradiation, matrix micro-cracking, and difficulty in producing complex shaped components at low cost. Thus, while the current generation of nuclear composites is undergoing active development, for the most commonly anticipated applications of these materials, no composite solution exists. General statement of how this problem or situation is being addressed. The proposed SiC/SiC composite material is based on a mixture of SiC particles combined with a SiC precursor slurry. During processing, this slurry is infiltrated into a SiC fiber preform which enhance radiation resistance. The fabrication process consists of a combination of vacuum assisted resin transfer molding and chemical vapor infiltration, and directly addresses the requirement for low cost manufacturing. What is to be done in Phase I? During Phase I, the material composition will be developed, sub-scale tubes and panels will be fabricated and tested for radiation resistance, mechanical strength, and bonding properties to determine feasibility of this approach. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits. The proposed technology will result in a high strength, radiation and temperature resistant Si-C composite able to be joined together, and produced at low cost. It will have commercial applications in areas such as structural components and blanket structures for nuclear power plants and fuel cladding (in particular, Generation IV gas-cooled and liquid fluoride salt-cooled reactors), aerospace, and industrial applications. Finally, a large commercial market is envisioned in aerospace rocket and engine components which require high strength, high temperature, and lightweight materials.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.50M | Year: 2016

Three major components—nitrogen, oxygen, and argon—make up 99.96% of Earth’s atmosphere, and measurement of the concentration/flux of these high concentration elements is crucial in studying changes in global climate and ecology. However, the current high-precision measurement technologies are better suited for detecting gases with low concentration, and a new technology needs to be developed for major components to measure gas concentration with a high precision in a response time

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