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Szigeti M.,Debrecen University | Bondar J.,University of Pannonia | Gjerde D.,PhyNexus Inc. | Keresztessy Z.,Debrecen University | And 2 more authors.
Journal of chromatography. B, Analytical technologies in the biomedical and life sciences | Year: 2016

N-glycosylation profiling of glycoprotein biotherapeutics is an essential step in each phase of product development in the biopharmaceutical industry. For example, during clone selection, hundreds of clones should be analyzed quickly from limited amounts of samples. On the other hand, identification of disease related glycosylation alterations can serve as early indicators (glycobiomarkers) for various pathological conditions in the biomedical field. Therefore, there is a growing demand for rapid and easy to automate sample preparation methods for N-glycosylation analysis. In this paper, we report on the design and implementation of immobilized recombinant glutathione-S-transferase (GST) tagged PNGase F enzyme microcolumns for rapid and efficient removal of N-linked carbohydrates from glycoproteins. Digestion speed and efficiency were compared to conventional in-solution based protocols. The use of PNGase F functionalized microcolumns resulted in efficient N-glycan removal in 10min from all major N-linked glycoprotein types of: (i) neutral (IgG), (ii) highly sialylated (fetuin), and (iii) high mannose (ribonuclease B) carbohydrate containing glycoprotein standards. The approach can be readily applied to automated sample preparation systems, such as liquid handling robots. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Olajos M.,Debrecen University | Olajos M.,University of Pannonia | Szekrenyes A.,Debrecen University | Hajos P.,University of Pannonia | And 2 more authors.
Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry | Year: 2010

In this paper, the effect of temperature is investigated on the performance of glycoprotein enrichment by boronic acid lectin affinity chromatography (BLAC). Wheat germ agglutinin and m-aminophenyl boronic acid containing stationary phases were evaluated individually and in a mixed mode using an automated liquid handling robot with an integrated 96-well plate temperature controller. Glycoaffinity enrichment of the model proteins of ribonuclease B and trypsin inhibitor was investigated in the presence of the non-glycosylated proteins of myoglobin (neutral) and lysozyme (basic) at a wide temperature range of 5-65 °C. Our results revealed that glycoaffinity micropartitioning at the temperature of 25 °C provided the highest recovery rate for glycoprotein enrichment. We have also found that a large amount of lysozyme was present in the elution fractions of the m-aminophenyl boronic acid containing micropartitioning columns due to ion-exchange mechanism occurring between the positively charged protein and the negatively charged stationary phase at the operation pH. On the other hand, at high temperature (65 °C), non-specific interactions with the agarose carrier prevailed, evidenced by the presence of myoglobin in the eluate. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.


Szigeti M.,Debrecen University | Bondar J.,University of Pannonia | Gjerde D.,PhyNexus Inc. | Keresztessy Z.,Debrecen University | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Chromatography B: Analytical Technologies in the Biomedical and Life Sciences | Year: 2016

N-glycosylation profiling of glycoprotein biotherapeutics is an essential step in each phase of product development in the biopharmaceutical industry. For example, during clone selection, hundreds of clones should be analyzed quickly from limited amounts of samples. On the other hand, identification of disease related glycosylation alterations can serve as early indicators (glycobiomarkers) for various pathological conditions in the biomedical field. Therefore, there is a growing demand for rapid and easy to automate sample preparation methods for N-glycosylation analysis. In this paper, we report on the design and implementation of immobilized recombinant glutathione-S-transferase (GST) tagged PNGase F enzyme microcolumns for rapid and efficient removal of N-linked carbohydrates from glycoproteins. Digestion speed and efficiency were compared to conventional in-solution based protocols. The use of PNGase F functionalized microcolumns resulted in efficient N-glycan removal in 10. min from all major N-linked glycoprotein types of: (i) neutral (IgG), (ii) highly sialylated (fetuin), and (iii) high mannose (ribonuclease B) carbohydrate containing glycoprotein standards. The approach can be readily applied to automated sample preparation systems, such as liquid handling robots. © 2016.


PubMed | University of Pannonia, PhyNexus Inc. and Debrecen University
Type: | Journal: Journal of chromatography. B, Analytical technologies in the biomedical and life sciences | Year: 2016

N-glycosylation profiling of glycoprotein biotherapeutics is an essential step in each phase of product development in the biopharmaceutical industry. For example, during clone selection, hundreds of clones should be analyzed quickly from limited amounts of samples. On the other hand, identification of disease related glycosylation alterations can serve as early indicators (glycobiomarkers) for various pathological conditions in the biomedical field. Therefore, there is a growing demand for rapid and easy to automate sample preparation methods for N-glycosylation analysis. In this paper, we report on the design and implementation of immobilized recombinant glutathione-S-transferase (GST) tagged PNGase F enzyme microcolumns for rapid and efficient removal of N-linked carbohydrates from glycoproteins. Digestion speed and efficiency were compared to conventional in-solution based protocols. The use of PNGase F functionalized microcolumns resulted in efficient N-glycan removal in 10min from all major N-linked glycoprotein types of: (i) neutral (IgG), (ii) highly sialylated (fetuin), and (iii) high mannose (ribonuclease B) carbohydrate containing glycoprotein standards. The approach can be readily applied to automated sample preparation systems, such as liquid handling robots.


PubMed | PhyNexus Inc. and Genentech
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of laboratory automation | Year: 2016

Biologics sample management facilities are often responsible for a diversity of large-molecule reagent types, such as DNA, RNAi, and protein libraries. Historically, the management of large molecules was dispersed into multiple laboratories. As methodologies to support pathway discovery, antibody discovery, and protein production have become high throughput, the implementation of automation and centralized inventory management tools has become important. To this end, to improve sample tracking, throughput, and accuracy, we have implemented a module-based automation system integrated into inventory management software using multiple platforms (Hamilton, Hudson, Dynamic Devices, and Brooks). Here we describe the implementation of these systems with a focus on high-throughput plasmid DNA production management.


Snijders A.P.,University of Sheffield | Snijders A.P.,Cancer Research UK | Hautbergue G.M.,University of Sheffield | Hautbergue G.M.,Cancer Research UK | And 10 more authors.
RNA | Year: 2015

Splicing factor proline- and glutamine-rich (SFPQ) also commonly known as polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated-splicing factor (PSF) and its binding partner non-POU domain-containing octamer-binding protein (NONO/p54nrb), are highly abundant, multifunctional nuclear proteins. However, the exact role of this complex is yet to be determined. Following purification of the endogeneous SFPQ/NONO complex, mass spectrometry analysis identified a wide range of interacting proteins, including those involved in RNA processing, RNA splicing, and transcriptional regulation, consistent with a multifunctional role for SFPQ/NONO. In addition, we have identified several sites of arginine methylation in SFPQ/PSF using mass spectrometry and found that several arginines in the N-terminal domain of SFPQ/PSF are asymmetrically dimethylated. Furthermore, we find that the protein arginine N-methyltransferase, PRMT1, catalyzes this methylation in vitro and that this is antagonized by citrullination of SFPQ. Arginine methylation and citrullination of SFPQ/PSF does not affect complex formation with NONO. However, arginine methylation was shown to increase the association with mRNA in mRNP complexes in mammalian cells. Finally we show that the biochemical properties of the endogenous complex from cell lysates are significantly influenced by the ionic strength during purification. At low ionic strength, the SFPQ/NONO complex forms large heterogeneous protein assemblies or aggregates, preventing the purification of the SFPQ/NONO complex. The ability of the SFPQ/NONO complex to form varying protein assemblies, in conjunction with the effect of post-translational modifications of SFPQ modulating mRNA binding, suggests key roles affecting mRNP dynamics within the cell. © 2015 Snijders et al.


Fritz J.S.,Iowa State University | Gjerde D.T.,PhyNexus Inc.
Journal of Chromatographic Science | Year: 2010

This year marks the 30th anniversary of the publication of Non-Suppressed Ion Chromatography, which is a method for the rapid separation of anions with on-line conductimetric detection. In this method, the separation column is connected directly to the conductimetric detector. This single-column method is a simpler technique than the original suppressed ion chromatography method, which requires a large suppressor column to reduce the background conductance. In the new method, the background signal is reduced to a manageable level simply by using an ionexchange separation column of low exchange capacity that lowers the eluent concentration needed for separation. The eluent ion used for separation is chosen based on having large, bulky structure, which lowers the equivalent conductance and facilitates detection of the sample anions. This is a personal account of the initial discovery and early development of non-suppressed ion chromatography. The circumstances for the discovery are recounted by the two authors. Methods are described for determination of anions, cations with indirect detection, and techniques for increasing detection sensitivity. A fundamental equation for the prediction of ion chromatography detector response is given, and the development of several types of detection schemes for ion chromatography is discussed. Finally, the impact of non-suppressed ion chromatography is discussed together with comments on the discovery process.


Trademark
PhyNexus Inc. | Date: 2012-05-01

Chemicals, namely, buffer and standard solutions used in analytical chemistry; Kit containing pre-packed columns, chemicals, pre-made buffer concentrates, syringes and instructional manual for the purification of proteins for in vitro use. Laboratory apparatus and instruments, namely, pre-packed columns for use in separation and purification; Scientific apparatus and instruments, namely, fluid handling device used for disposable bioprocessing applications and parts and fittings therefor.

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