Covina, CA, United States
Covina, CA, United States

Time filter

Source Type

A method of allowing a work-piece to obtain its free state shape while bonded to an adhesive fixture includes allowing the fixing surfaces to change shape or position relative to a fixture base without degrading the holding strength of the adhesive joints. A floating adhesive fixture may use one or more floating adhesive fixture devices. Each device includes a fixture element with an integral fixing surface that can displace relative to the fixture, a clamping system that can release or prevent this motion, and a suspension that keeps the fixture element in a nominal position when the clamping system is disengaged. A method includes unclamping the fixture elements and allowing them to displace as the adhesive joints and work-piece reduce strain energy. The clamping of the fixture elements prepares the fixture for the ensuing manufacturing process.


A method of allowing a work-piece to obtain its free state shape while bonded to an adhesive fixture includes allowing the fixing surfaces to change shape or position relative to a fixture base without degrading the holding strength of the adhesive joints. A floating adhesive fixture may use one or more floating adhesive fixture devices. Each device includes a fixture element with an integral fixing surface that can displace relative to the fixture, a clamping system that can release or prevent this motion, and a suspension that keeps the fixture element in a nominal position when the clamping system is disengaged. A method includes unclamping the fixture elements and allowing them to displace as the adhesive joints and work-piece reduce strain energy. The clamping of the fixture elements prepares the fixture for the ensuing manufacturing process.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: BSG-SME | Phase: SME-1 | Award Amount: 1.50M | Year: 2011

In August 2009 was fully implemented the reform of the Common Market Organization for wine (CR N479/2008, 29-04-2008). It aims at reducing the 24 million hl/year surplus of basic low quality wine, phasing out the 500 million/year spent on wine disposal subsidies and making EU wine more competitive. This reform, together with other market constraints will endanger all EU winegrowing SMEs. To survive, they will have to increase crop value, reduce the production of basic wine and convert part into premium quality. This can be achieved by implementing new and more effective field control methods. PREMIVM proposes a low-cost, handheld device capable of non-invasively estimating ripeness and vigour parameters for grapes and vine plants. All this in the vineyard, by means of the innovative use of chlorophyll fluorescence and reflectance multispectral data correlated by specific mathematical models, with GPS tags for all readings. The device will provide data to precisely control the field, and increase production value up to 25% (expected yearly 5.000-10.000/ha income increase for winegrowing SMEs like PEREZ, QMF and PERACCIO). With a cost of 2500/ unit, consortium manufacture and distribution SMEs PSI and AGRI estimate, through a joint-venture, to reach at least 2% of the market in 5 years. This is equivalent to an expected income of 70 million, with a 30 million profit and a ROI of 0.86. The consortium provides the complementary business capabilities, commercial networks and research expertise to guarantee the technology a quick route to the market. All members are fully committed to ensuring the success of the project, led by the SMEs in testing, validating, using and protecting the results outsourced to the necessary expertise in Chl-F&R, optical instrumentation, botany, IT solutions, communications and prototyping of RTDs BIOENG, KIT and ISBE.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 3.87M | Year: 2016

In the face of the increasing global consumption of fossil resources, photosynthetic organisms offer an attractive alternative that could meet our rising future needs as clean, renewable, sources of energy and for the production of fine chemicals. Key to the efficient exploitation of these organisms is to optimise the conversion of Solar Energy into Biomass (SE2B). The SE2B network deals with this optimisation in an interdisciplinary approach including molecular biology, biochemistry, biophysics and biotechnology. Regulation processes at the level of the photosynthetic membranes, integrating molecular processes within individual proteins up to flexible re-arrangements of the membranes, will be analysed as a dynamic network of interacting regulations. SE2B will yield information about the similarities and differences between cyanobacteria, green algae, diatoms and higher plants, the organisms most commonly employed in biotechnological approaches exploiting photosynthetic organisms, as well as in agriculture. The knowledge gained from understanding these phenomena will be directly transferred to increase the productivity of algal mass cultures for valuable products, and for the development of sophisticated analytic devices that are used to optimise this production. In future, the knowledge created can also be applicable to the design of synthetic cell factories with efficient light harvesting and energy conversion systems. The SE2B network will train young researchers to work at the forefront of innovations that shape the bio-based economy. SE2B will develop a training program based on individual and network-wide training on key research and transferable skills, and will furthermore disseminate these results by open online courses prepared by the young researchers themselves.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.05M | Year: 2014

Rapid, in situ assessment of suspicious powders within inorganic matrices, with particular emphasis on powders of biological origin, is currently limited to detection by biochemical methodologies that react with monomers such amino acids, nucleic acids, l


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2013

In situ assessment of suspicious powders within inorganic matrices, with particular emphasis on powders of biological origin, is currently limited to detection by biochemical methodologies that react with monomers such amino acids, nucleic acids, lipids or macromolecule compounds comprised of these basic subunits. These current methods include immunoassays or PCR, both of which require expensive equipment and reagents with limited shelf life and restrictive environmental conditions for storage and use. Current optical methods such as Raman spectroscopy using excitation in the near IR at 785 nm or visible at 532 nm, have not been able to detect or distinguish biological materials. Until recently, these have been the only classes of handheld instrumentation available to address the problem of identifying suspicious powders in near real-time and in situ at the site of an incident. We propose to develop and demonstrate an emerging handheld technology that employs a fusion of deep UV excited Raman and fluorescence spectroscopic methods that enable non-contact, real-time, detection and classification of trace amounts of biological material: without the need for reagents, labels or other consumables; without contact with or disturbing the suspicious powder and subsequent need for decontamination of instrumentation or spread of the powder.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2013

Proposal Number IIP-1315831 This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project is to develop and demonstrate a low cost, hand-held, reagentless instrument to provide real-time, in-situ, detection of trace chemical contaminants in water for environmental, municipal waste treatment, industrial waste, and other fixed and mobile water measurement settings. A specific example of the Trace Chemical (TraC) sensor is aimed at an on-line or off-line monitoring system that will improve the reliability and performance of wastewater treatment systems that are designed to remove nitrogen through Simultaneous Nitrification and DeNitrification (SNdN). This is an example of a major source of potential environmental contamination. The technology of the proposed innovative sensor is deep ultraviolet excited resonance Raman (DUV-RR) and native fluorescence spectroscopy which will enable real time, in situ, measurement of nitrate and nitrite in Biological Nutrient Removal (BNR) system reactors without the need for reagents, sample handling, or complex calibration procedures. The TraC sensor integrates two new technologies to provide dramatic reductions in size, weight, power consumption, and cost: a new technology narrow and stable linewidth deep UV laser and a new technology high data rate linear resistive gate CCD array detector. The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is to replace many analytical instruments that are currently employed to measure bulk or trace contaminants in water, air, soils, or surfaces. Most existing instruments require a significant amount of sample preparation and handling as well as the use of reagents and other consumables. Optical methods of analyzing contaminants continue to gain importance because of the basic non-contact, non-invasive nature, and speed of the measurement. Raman and native fluorescence spectroscopy has been increasingly employed to provide high levels of specificity in chemical identification without the need for dye tags or labels. This has been done to date in instruments mostly operating in the visible and infrared. Operating at these wavelengths has provided significant limitations in the types and concentrations of chemicals that can be detected because of low cross-sections and/or fluorescence obscuration of weak Raman emissions at these wavelengths. Moving to the deep UV below 250 nm offers a solution which has been demonstrated in large laboratory instruments but not yet possible in hand-held instruments. This will open up many markets for trace contaminant detection in a broad range of water, and soil environmental, force protection, and municipal, industrial, agricultural, and medical applications.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.20M | Year: 2013

We propose to develop a soda-can-size, 500 g, 400 mW instrument for mounting on small lander or rover arms: the ultra-Compact Optical Spectrometer for Organic Mapping (uCOSOM) instrument. Two core technologies enable the proposed instrument: a narrow linewidth deep UV laser and a new uncooled, resistive gate linear DUV CCD array detector with high quantum efficiency in the DUV with fast read rates and low read noise. The need for in situ micro-scale mapping for trace concentrations of organics on planetary surfaces is exemplified by requirements put forth the (July 09) Mid Range Rover; Science Analysis Group (MRR-SAG) and again in a 2010 Astrobiology paper by Pratt et al. uCOSOM fulfills similar organic needs on future in-situ missions with MER class rover/arm sizes or small landers to planetary bodies such as Mars, icy worlds (Titan, Europa, Enceladus), and small primitive bodies. uCOSOM provides a broad organic and inorganic compound measurement capability without the need for sample handling or reagents. It will excite sub-ppb levels of organic compounds on rocks, soil, or other surfaces in the deep UV below 250 nm and simultaneously measure Raman scattering in the 250 nm to 260 nm region (1000 to 4000 cm-1) and native fluorescence in the 260 nm to 700 nm region at a working distance of several cm, with long depth of focus, and with the ability to map areas up to 1 by 1 cm in size with 100 micrometer spatial resolution. The pulsed source enables solar blind gated Raman and fluorescence spectral measurements but also fluorescence and phosphorescence decay measurements to provide orthogonal information about target composition. The instrument can also provide spectral reflectance of targets from 250 nm to 700 nm together with Raman and fluorescence data, using solar illumination, and enable solar and stellar irradiance and sky background measurements.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 124.07K | Year: 2015

This proposal addresses the need for advanced analytical methods and instrumentation to detect trace levels of chemical and biological contaminants directly on spacecraft and related surfaces to comply with Contamination Control and Planetary Protection requirements in an effort to preserve sample science integrity for life detection investigations on Europa, Enceladus, Mars, etc. The proposed methods employ non-contact deep UV Raman and fluorescence chemical imaging and mapping methods to avoid the need for any contact with spacecraft and related surfaces. The method eliminates the use of traditional sample collection methods such as swabs, wipes, or other methods, which have been shown to back-contaminate spacecraft surfaces as well as collected samples. Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy with excitation in the deep UV below 250 nm enables separation of the spectral regions of both Raman and fluorescence emissions, enabling collection of Raman emissions without obscuration by fluorescence from chemicals of interest as well as many spacecraft materials and from trace organic contamination within field of view of the Raman detection optics. This cannot be accomplished with excitation at longer wavelength including 263 nm or 266 nm from 4th harmonic Nd based lasers. Combining Raman and fluorescence methods in the deep UV enhances the ability to detect and identify the trace chemical or biological materials on these surfaces and have a proven ability to detect biological and other particles and materials on surfaces less than 1 pg, the mass of a single bacterial spore, with dimensions as small as 200 nm. These methods were first developed under funding from NASA Planetary Protection, but were advanced by contracts with several Department of Defense organizations well as commercial developments with both Pfizer Pharmaceutical and DuPont for chemical and biological cleaning validation of their manufacturing equipment.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2013

Proposal Number IIP-1315831

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project is to develop and demonstrate a low cost, hand-held, reagentless instrument to provide real-time, in-situ, detection of trace chemical contaminants in water for environmental, municipal waste treatment, industrial waste, and other fixed and mobile water measurement settings. A specific example of the Trace Chemical (TraC) sensor is aimed at an on-line or off-line monitoring system that will improve the reliability and performance of wastewater treatment systems that are designed to remove nitrogen through Simultaneous Nitrification and DeNitrification (SNdN). This is an example of a major source of potential environmental contamination. The technology of the proposed innovative sensor is deep ultraviolet excited resonance Raman (DUV-RR) and native fluorescence spectroscopy which will enable real time, in situ, measurement of nitrate and nitrite in Biological Nutrient Removal (BNR) system reactors without the need for reagents, sample handling, or complex calibration procedures. The TraC sensor integrates two new technologies to provide dramatic reductions in size, weight, power consumption, and cost: a new technology narrow and stable linewidth deep UV laser and a new technology high data rate linear resistive gate CCD array detector.

The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is to replace many analytical instruments that are currently employed to measure bulk or trace contaminants in water, air, soils, or surfaces. Most existing instruments require a significant amount of sample preparation and handling as well as the use of reagents and other consumables. Optical methods of analyzing contaminants continue to gain importance because of the basic non-contact, non-invasive nature, and speed of the measurement. Raman and native fluorescence spectroscopy has been increasingly employed to provide high levels of specificity in chemical identification without the need for dye tags or labels. This has been done to date in instruments mostly operating in the visible and infrared. Operating at these wavelengths has provided significant limitations in the types and concentrations of chemicals that can be detected because of low cross-sections and/or fluorescence obscuration of weak Raman emissions at these wavelengths. Moving to the deep UV below 250 nm offers a solution which has been demonstrated in large laboratory instruments but not yet possible in hand-held instruments. This will open up many markets for trace contaminant detection in a broad range of water, and soil environmental, force protection, and municipal, industrial, agricultural, and medical applications.

Loading Photon Systems collaborators
Loading Photon Systems collaborators