Lithia Springs, GA, United States

PhosphorTech Corporation

www.phosphortech.com
Lithia Springs, GA, United States
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Li Z.,Shandong Normal University | Li Z.,Georgia Institute of Technology | Park W.,University of Colorado at Boulder | Zorzetto G.,Georgia Institute of Technology | And 3 more authors.
Chemistry of Materials | Year: 2014

A novel structure, δ-doped NaYF4:Yb,Er, has been proposed for significantly enhancing the fluorescence efficiency of up-conversion phosphors. Theoretical calculations indicate that these new δ-doped NaYF4:Yb,Er structures will suppress the Yb3+-defect energy transfer rate while effectively preserving or enhancing the Yb 3+ to Er3+ energy transfer. To investigate this effect δ-doped NaYF4:Yb,Er nanocrystals have been synthesized according to the designed structure model and the prepared samples characterized physically by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersed spectroscopy (EDS) and optically by photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Well-defined doping geometries of the order of 3-5 nm in width were clearly identified, both spatially and chemically. The up-converted emission spectra data were consistent with the theoretical predictions. © 2014 American Chemical Society.


Menkara H.,PhosphorTech Corporation | Gilstrap Jr. R.A.,PhosphorTech Corporation | Morris T.,PhosphorTech Corporation | Minkara M.,PhosphorTech Corporation | And 2 more authors.
Optics Express | Year: 2011

We report the development of new nanophosphor structures based on the Mn-doped ZnSeS material system to enhance the color properties, luminosity and efficiency of white LEDs. These structures have been demonstrated for phosphor-based white LED applications utilizing both blue and UV LED systems. Bandgap tuning for near UV (405 nm) and blue (460 nm) excitations are reported. Using various optimization procedures, we have produced ZnSe:Mn nanoparticles with an external quantum yield greater than 80%. © 2011 Optical Society of America.


Patent
PhosphorTech Corporation | Date: 2014-02-05

A light converter, and lights and displays incorporating the light converter are disclosed together with methods of making the light converter. The light converter has a substrate having a first layer of phosphor particles disposed on an area of one surface of the substrate. The first layer has a thickness of about 1 monolayer of phosphor particles, and the phosphor particles in the first layer form a uniform and dense layer. The thickness of the substrate can be between about 25 m and about 500 m in embodiments intended to be flexible and between about 0.5 mm and 2 mm in embodiments that can be formed into rigid shapes. The screen weight of the phosphor particles is between about 0.5 mg/cm^(2 )and about 40 mg/cm^(2). The substrate can include a base layer and an adhesive layer.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.97K | Year: 2016

Achieving higher luminous efficacy in phosphor converted light emitting diodes (pcLED) requires breakthroughs in down-converting materials that provide high conversion efficiency, tunable narrow bandwidth emission, and temperature/chemical stability. To achieve these goals, PhosphorTech (PTC) and its partners propose the development of high performance hybrid inorganic down-converting (HID) material systems for high brightness LED (HBLED) applications. While conventional bulk phosphors are currently the dominant down-converters used in high power solid-state lighting (SSL) applications, their performance is limited by intrinsic properties such as high scattering cross-sections and large emission bandwidth. On the other hand, conventional luminescent nanocrystals (e.g, quantum dots or QDs) have high self- absorption and poor thermal and chemical stability for HB LEDs. By designing an all- inorganic hybrid system, PTC believes that the new HID materials will outperform both bulk phosphors and conventional QDs. Ultimately, these materials will enable a new generation of solid state lighting devices with high luminous efficacies, high color and thermal stability, and with spectral efficiency near the theoretical maximum luminous efficacy of radiation (LER), as a result of their color tunability and narrow bandwidths (FWHM < 30nm).


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 999.73K | Year: 2016

Solid state lighting (SSL) is a fast growing technology, which is starting to replace conventional lighting products such as fluorescent and incandescent bulbs. While the current efficiency of some commercial SSL products has surpassed those of most traditional lighting, it is still far below what the technology is theoretically capable of. The main reasons are attributed to poor light extraction and limited white spectral tunability that inhibit reaching the maximum luminous efficacy of radiation (LER). General statement of how this problem is being addressed. This is the overall objective of the combined Phase I and Phase II projects - typically, one to two sentences. We propose a new approach for maximizing the luminous efficacy of a phosphor down-converting LED system using a combination of (1) new high quantum yield (QY) red phosphor development, (2) surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and (3) enhanced light extraction efficiency using phosphor film technology. It is believed that this combinatorial approach to material development and phosphor structure optimization is the key to achieving solid state lighting with high luminous efficacies and spectral efficiency performance approaching the maximum luminous efficacy of radiation (LER), and with significantly reduced dependence on rare-earth compounds. What is planned for the Phase I project (typically, two to three sentences). Phase I will focus on demonstrating the feasibility of plasmonic-enhanced phosphor films applied to blue LEDs. This will be achieved by synthesizing various nano-metals that are known to exhibit surface plasmon resonance effects. Those metal nanostructures will be applied directly to phosphor particles using a thin layer of silica shell that can act as a spacer layer. The resulting structure will then be compared to the un-modified phosphor film in order to demonstrate >30% improved light extraction. COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS AND OTHER BENEFITS as described by the applicant. (Limit to space provided). The proposed materials and structures have applicability not just in solid state lighting, but potentially in all existing lamp products including incandescent, tungsten-halogen, and all types of fluorescents lamps. Thus, any current application in indoor/outdoor lighting, or backlighting in portable electronics will immediately benefit from the increased energy savings. Additionally this technology can significantly enhance the performance of solar cell technologies by enhancing absorption of the solar spectrum by the solar cell.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.94K | Year: 2015

Statement of the problem or situation that is being addressed - typically, one to three sentences. Solid state lighting (SSL) is a fast growing technology, which is starting to replace conventional lighting products such as fluorescent and incandescent bulbs. While the current efficiency of some commercial SSL products has surpassed those of most traditional lighting, it is still far below what the technology is theoretically capable of. The main reasons are attributed to poor light extraction and limited white spectral tunability that inhibit reaching the maximum luminous efficacy of radiation (LER). General statement of how this problem is being addressed. This is the overall objective of the combined Phase I and Phase II projects - typically, one to two sentences. We propose a new approach for maximizing the luminous efficacy of a phosphor down-converting LED system using a combination of (1) new high quantum yield (QY) red phosphor development, (2) surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and (3) enhanced light extraction efficiency using phosphor film technology. It is believed that this combinatorial approach to material development and phosphor structure optimization is the key to achieving solid state lighting with high luminous efficacies and spectral efficiency performance approaching the maximum luminous efficacy of radiation (LER), and with significantly reduced dependence on rare-earth compounds. What is planned for the Phase I project (typically, two to three sentences). Phase I will focus on demonstrating the feasibility of plasmonic-enhanced phosphor films applied to blue LEDs. This will be achieved by synthesizing various nano-metals that are known to exhibit surface plasmon resonance effects. Those metal nanostructures will be applied directly to phosphor particles using a thin layer of silica shell that can act as a spacer layer. The resulting structure will then be compared to the un-modified phosphor film in order to demonstrate >30% improved light extraction. COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS AND OTHER BENEFITS as described by the applicant. (Limit to space provided). The proposed materials and structures have applicability not just in solid state lighting, but potentially in all existing lamp products including incandescent, tungsten-halogen, and all types of fluorescents lamps. Thus, any current application in indoor/outdoor lighting, or backlighting in portable electronics will immediately benefit from the increased energy savings. Additionally this technology can significantly enhance the performance of solar cell technologies by enhancing absorption of the solar spectrum by the solar cell. SUMMARY FOR MEMBERS OF CONGRESS: (LAYMAN'S TERMS, TWO SENTENCES MAX.) Plasmonic nanostructures will initiate new paradigms in the conservation and generation of energy. Higher efficiency lamps and solar cell technologies will be produced that will revolutionize the US lighting and solar power industries, by providing competitive technologies that will significantly reduce global energy use and environmental pollution.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.95K | Year: 2012

In this phase I SBIR project, we propose to develop a new type of photo-catalyst nanowire structure for high yield CO2 reforming into fuels and useful chemicals by sunlight energy. Despite the published successes of TiO2 nanorods/nanotubes as photo-catalyst materials, such systems work primarily in the ultraviolet spectral region ( & lt;390 nm) and suffer from poor visible light absorption. The proposed metal-oxide photo-catalyst structure has an ability to absorb both visible and infrared solar energy (as well as UV), therefore allowing it to harvest a significant portion of available solar energy. The resulting CO2 reforming yield, as recently published by PhosphorTech, is 6X higher in thin-film structures compared to that reported for TiO2 nanotubes. One of the goals of the phase I project is to further increase the reforming yield by an additional 20X through the use of nanowire instead of thin-film structures. In addition, such structures can simultaneously reform CO2 while neutralizing organic contaminants found in industrial wastewater or natural organic matter typically found in surface water. These advantages will make it practical to place sunlight-powered photo-catalytic reactors near industrial facilities that are large emitters of CO2 and have ample supply of organic contaminants in their water (oil/gas, chemical plants, pulp/paper, power plants, etc.).


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 446.40K | Year: 2010

The nature of electromagnetic launchers requires operation in a harsh environment due to the large electromagnetic field, electrical current, temperature, and mechanical stresses present during a shot. This environment can significantly reduce the lifetime of the rails and therefore limits the military utility of the device. Increasing the lifetime of the rails while maintaining high launch velocities is a critical requirement for electromagnetic launcher development and is the focus of a number of ongoing research efforts. These efforts, however, are hindered by a lack of diagnostic capabilities to support the modeling and simulation needed to design better launchers. Diagnostics are a particular challenge for electromagnetic launchers for a number of reasons, including a lack of access to the interior of the launcher, electromagnetic interference with sensors that use electrical signals, and high temperature and mechanical stress conditions that make survivability of sensors an issue. The electromagnetic launcher modeling and simulation (M&S) community has identified a number of parameters that represent critical diagnostic capability shortfalls for electromagnetic launchers. The highest priority items on that list are temperature, magnetic fields, and stress measured with sufficient spatial and temporal resolution. During Phase I project, PhosphorTech successfully demonstrated the feasibility of using a high-speed and repeatable phosphor-based approach to measuring temperature up to 700 degrees C. The proposed Phase II work is based on further development of the technological innovation performed in Phase I and subsequent implementation on actual electromagnetic launchers.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.98K | Year: 2011

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): A new class of high-performance X-ray phosphor screens will be developed based on dot-in-a-rod core/shell nanorod (NR) structures embedded in transparent polymer matrices, with applications to protein crystallography, digital radiography and mammography, as well as a host of other important imaging and lighting applications. The goal is to achieve high spatial resolution, very fast time response, minimum afterglow, minimum self-absorption and excellent X-ray conversion efficiency. Our nano- composite phosphor screens will be X-ray tested by Radiation Monitoring Devices (RMD) and compared with equivalent spherical quantum dot (QD) screens and conventional micro-crystalline ZnSe:Cu,Cl and Gd2O2S:Tb phosphor screens. Although phosphor screens made from micron-sized phosphors are efficient, bright X-ray converters, their large particle size produces a great deal of scatter, which limits their spatial resolution. Preliminary theoretical and experimental studies show that nanophosphors in a transparent polymer-matrix screen exhibit significantly higher spatial resolution than micron-sized phosphor particles. Compared with spherical QDs, NR exhibits much larger Stokes shift to minimize self-absorption. In addition, their fast decay times and low afterglow characteristics will ensure response times orders of magnitude faster than existing phosphors. Moreover, to increase X-ray absorption, NR structures can be made from high-Z materials to increase X-ray absorption and their spectral emission tuned to match the spectral sensitivity of CCD sensors. Specifically in Phase I, we will prepare NR structures and related screening techniques, and quantify their X-ray photoluminescence performance. Success in Phase I will be proven if we can show that these NR structures are significantly better than existing micron-sized crystalline phosphors and conventional spherical quantum dots, in terms of spatial resolution, time resolution, and self-absorption. In Phase II, we will develop the techniques to synthesize large quantities of high quality nanocrystals, and optimize large screen characteristics for protein crystallography and medical imaging CCD detectors. NR-based X-ray converting films will have significant applications in digital radiography, crystallography, mammography, and various other biomedical imaging applications, enhancing their value to the NIH and to the molecular biology and medical communities as a whole. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: The proposed nanorod luminescent structures will significantly enhance the performance of X-ray imaging compared to current state-of-the art. They will have applications in digital radiography, crystallography, and various medical imaging applications, enhancing their value to the NIH and to the molecular biology and medical communities as a whole.


Trademark
PhosphorTech Corporation | Date: 2013-03-02

Chemicals, namely, phosphors.

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