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Shi Z.,Huazhong University of Science and Technology | Phillips G.O.,Glyndwr University | Phillips G.O.,Phillips Hydrocolloids Research Ltd. | Yang G.,Huazhong University of Science and Technology
Nanoscale | Year: 2013

Cellulose-based electroconductive composites can be prepared by combining conducting electroactive materials with hydrophilic biocompatible cellulose. Inorganic nanoparticles, such as metal ions and oxides, carbon nanotubes, graphene and graphene oxide, conducting polymers, and ionic liquids (through doping, blending or coating) can be introduced into the cellulose matrix. Such composites can form a biocompatible interface for microelectronic devices, and provide a biocompatible matrix or scaffold for electrically stimulated drug release devices, implantable biosensors, and neuronal prostheses. Here the benefits of combining conventional and bacterial cellulose with these electroactive composites are described and future applications are considered. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013.


Shi Z.,Huazhong University of Science and Technology | Zhang Y.,Huazhong University of Science and Technology | Phillips G.O.,Glyndwr University | Phillips G.O.,Phillips Hydrocolloids Research Ltd. | Yang G.,Huazhong University of Science and Technology
Food Hydrocolloids | Year: 2014

Bacterial cellulose (BC), a microbial polysaccharide, has significant potential as a food ingredient in view of its high purity, in situ change of flavor and color, and having the ability to form various shapes and textures. As a nano-scale fiber it can form a 3D network structure. Its material properties are multifunctional, with potential uses for thickening and gelling, stabilizing, water-binding and as a packing material. This review deals with current research and possible applications in the food industry. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Nie S.-P.,Nanchang University | Nie S.-P.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | Wang C.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | Cui S.W.,Nanchang University | And 5 more authors.
Food Hydrocolloids | Year: 2013

Using the more recently available techniques such as methylation-GC-MS, 1D (1H, 13C) and 2D (COSY, TOCSY, HMQC and HMBC) NMR spectral analysis, we have revisited the classical structure of gum arabic (Acacia senegal). Methylation and GC-MS analysis confirmed that gum arabic (A. senegal) is a highly branched polysaccharide with the backbone composed of 1,3-linked galactopyransyl (Galp) residues substituted at O-2, O-6 or O-4 positions. The terminal sugar residues are 59.5% of the total sugars. The residues of →2,3,6-β-d-Galp1→, →3,4-Galp1→, →3,4,6-Galp1→ and substitutions at O-2 and O-4 position were not identified in previous studies. © 2012.


Ushida K.,Kyoto Prefectural University | Hatanaka H.,Kyoto Prefectural University | Inoue R.,Kyoto Prefectural University | Tsukahara T.,Kyoto Prefectural University | And 3 more authors.
Food Hydrocolloids | Year: 2011

Abdominal obesity is the most prevalent manifestation of metabolic syndrome. The anti-obese effects of dietary fiber is generally accepted, but specifically the anti-obese properties of the dietary fiber, gum arabic (GA) has not been well studied. In this investigation, we offered GA to the female 90 days old mice in the form of drink (1% w/v) for 180 days. Such GA in drinking water reduced age-dependent fat deposition in the visceral adipose tissue and improved the gastrocnemius muscle reduction. This inhibition of fat deposition effect is due to the β3-adrenergic stimulation of adipocytes in which TNFα down-regulation is probably involved. Modification of large intestinal microflora, as evidenced by a modification of cecal short-chain fatty acid profile and of 16S rDNA profile, may contribute to such reduction in TNFα expression in the adipose tissues. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.


Nie S.-P.,Nanchang University | Nie S.-P.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | Wang C.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | Cui S.W.,Nanchang University | And 5 more authors.
Food Hydrocolloids | Year: 2013

The structure of gum arabic (Acacia seyal) has been studied using methylation analysis and 2D (COSY, TOCSY, HMQC and HMBC) NMR spectroscopy. Galacturonic acid (13.66%) is a major component not previously identified. The backbone is made up of 1,3-linked galactopyranosyl (Gal. p) residues substituted at O-2, O-6 or O-4 positions, which are terminated with mainly arabinofuranosyl (Ara. f), galacturonopyranosyl (Gal. pA), rhamnopyranosyl (Rha. p), but occasionally with arabinopyranosyl (Ara. p), and glucuronopyranosyl (Glc. pA) residues. There are long side chains of →3)-α-l-Ara. f-(1→ and →2)-α-l-Ara. f-(1→ linked to the backbone. © 2013.

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