Philadelphia, PA, United States
Philadelphia, PA, United States

Time filter

Source Type

Williams C.T.,University of Illinois at Chicago | Kim S.,University of Illinois at Chicago | Meyer J.,Yale University | Spaulding A.,Emory University | And 7 more authors.
AIDS and Behavior | Year: 2013

Women represent a significant and growing segment of jail detainees and persons living with HIV. This paper examines gender differences in health status, care and social service needs, and care engagement among jail releasees with HIV. Data are from 1,270 participants in the HRSA-funded Enhancing Linkages to HIV Primary Care and Social Services multisite demonstration project (EnhanceLink). Compared to men, more women reported homelessness, reduced adherence to prescribed ART, worse health, more severe substance use disorders, and more chronic health conditions. Men and women generally reported different needs post-release. As the number of expressed needs increased, women were more likely to drop out of care. Our findings suggest that effective and gender-specific strategies are required to identify needs, link services between jails and communities, and sustain retention of women with HIV in programs after release from criminal justice settings.


Sulkowski M.S.,University of Baltimore | Naggie S.,Duke University | Lalezari J.,Clinical Research | Fessel W.J.,Kaiser Permanente | And 13 more authors.
JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association | Year: 2014

IMPORTANCE: Treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in patients also infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been limited due to drug interactions with antiretroviral therapies (ARTs) and the need to use interferon. OBJECTIVE: To determine the rates of HCV eradication (sustained virologic response [SVR]) and adverse events in patients with HCV-HIV coinfection receiving sofosbuvir and ribavirin treatment. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Open-label, nonrandomized, uncontrolled phase 3 trial conducted at 34 treatment centers in the United States and Puerto Rico (August 2012-November 2013) evaluating treatment with sofosbuvir and ribavirin among patients with HCV genotypes 1, 2, or 3 and concurrent HIV. Patients were required to be receiving ART with HIV RNA values of 50 copies/mL or less and a CD4 T-cell count of more than 200 cells/μL or to have untreated HIV infection with a CD4 T-cell count of more than 500 cells/μL. Of the treatment-naive patients, 114 had HCV genotype 1 and 68 had HCV genotype 2 or 3, and 41 treatment experienced participants who had been treated with peginterferon-ribavirin had HCV genotype 2 or 3, for a total of 223 participants. INTERVENTIONS: Treatment-naive patients with HCV genotype 2 or 3 received 400 mg of sofosbuvir and weight-based ribavirin for 12 weeks and treatment-naive patients with HCV genotype 1 and treatment-experienced patients with HCV genotype 2 or 3 received the same treatment for 24 weeks. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: The primary study outcomewas the proportion of patients with SVR (serum HCV <25 copies/mL) 12 weeks (SVR12) after cessation of HCV therapy. RESULTS: Among treatment-naive participants, 87 patients (76%) of 114 (95%CI, 67%-84%) with genotype 1, 23 patients (88%) of 26 with genotype 2 (95%CI, 70%-985), and 28 patients (67%) of 42 with genotype 3 (95%CI, 51%-80%) achieved SVR12. Among treatment-experienced participants, 22 patients (92%) of 24 with genotype 2 (95%CI, 73%-99%) and 16 patients (94%) of 17 (95%CI, 71%-100%) achieved SVR12. The most common adverse events were fatigue, insomnia, headache, and nausea. Seven patients (3%) discontinued HCV treatment due to adverse events. No adverse effect on HIV disease or its treatment was observed. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: In this open-label, nonrandomized, uncontrolled study, patients with HIV who were coinfected with HCV genotype 1, 2, or 3 who received the oral, interferon-free combination of sofosbuvir and ribavirin for 12 or 24 weeks had high rates of SVR12. Further studies of this oral regimen in diverse populations of coinfected patients are warranted. TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01667731. Copyright 2014 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.


Pecoraro A.,University of Pennsylvania | Royer-Malvestuto C.,University of Pennsylvania | Rosenwasser B.,Philadelphia FIGHT | Rosenwasser B.,Temple University | And 6 more authors.
AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV | Year: 2013

Although advances in pharmacotherapy have enabled people living with HIV/AIDS to live longer, fuller lives, some leave medical care, resulting in sub-optimal treatment and increased health risk to themselves and others. Forty-one patients who dropped out of an urban, publically funded primary care HIV clinic were contacted and encouraged by outreach staff to return. Participants were interviewed within two weeks of returning, and themes associated with dropping out and returning were elicited and content analyzed. Dropping out was associated with drug/alcohol use, unstable housing/ homelessness, psychiatric disorders, incarceration, problems with HIV medications, inability to accept the diagnosis, relocation, stigma, problems with the clinic, and forgetfulness. Returning was associated with health concerns, substance abuse treatment/recovery, stable housing, incarceration/release, positive feelings about the clinic, spirituality, and assistance from family/relocation. Because a large number of patients reported substance abuse, depression, and past suicide attempts. Clinic staff should assess substance use, depression, and suicidal ideation at each primary care visit and encourage patients to obtain substance abuse treatment and mental health care. Future interventions could include providing SBIRT and/or onsite mental health and substance abuse treatment, all of which may boost retention. © 2013 © 2013 Taylor & Francis.


Brooks A.C.,Treatment Research Institute | DiGuiseppi G.,Treatment Research Institute | Laudet A.,National Development and Research Institute | Rosenwasser B.,Philadelphia FIGHT | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment | Year: 2012

Training community-based addiction counselors in empirically supported treatments (ESTs) far exceeds the ever-decreasing resources of publicly funded treatment agencies. This feasibility study describes the development and pilot testing of a group counseling toolkit (an approach adapted from the education field) focused on relapse prevention (RP). When counselors (N = 17) used the RP toolkit after 3 hours of training, their content adherence scores on "coping with craving" and "drug refusal skills" showed significant improvement, as indicated by very large effect sizes (Cohen's d = 1.49 and 1.34, respectively). Counselor skillfulness, in the "adequate-to-average" range at baseline, did not change. Although this feasibility study indicates some benefit to counselor EST acquisition, it is important to note that the impact of the curriculum on client outcomes is unknown. Because a majority of addiction treatment is delivered in group format, a multimedia curriculum approach may assist counselors in applying ESTs in the context of actual service delivery. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.


Daughtridge G.W.,University of Pennsylvania | Conyngham S.C.,Philadelphia FIGHT | Ramirez N.,Philadelphia FIGHT | Koenig H.C.,Philadelphia FIGHT | Koenig H.C.,University of Pennsylvania
Journal of the International Association of Providers of AIDS Care | Year: 2015

In 2012, the US Food and Drug Administration approved Truvada as a pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for adults at risk of HIV. PrEP is highly effective at preventing HIV when taken daily, but no gold standard exists for consistently administering PrEP to populations at highest risk. The "I Am Men's Health" program used an innovative methodology to generate adherence to PrEP in 23 mostly young men who have sex with men of color (yMSMc), during a 28-week period from February to September 2013. Adherence was measured using weekly medication pickup rates. The average age of the participants was 21 years, and the majority were black and lived below the poverty line. Time on PrEP ranged from 1 to 28 weeks (2723 person-days), and the weighted average adherence was 73%. The methodology used in this study was preliminarily effective at generating adherence to PrEP among high-risk yMSMc in a community setting and may help inform large-scale future HIV prevention interventions. © The Author(s) 2014.


Hodder S.L.,Rutgers University | Mounzer K.,Philadelphia FIGHT | Mounzer K.,University of Pennsylvania | Dejesus E.,Orlando Immunology Center | And 6 more authors.
AIDS Patient Care and STDs | Year: 2010

A randomized, open-label, multicenter study was conducted to evaluate the therapeutic switch to a single-tablet formulation of efavirenz/emtricitabine/ tenofovir DF (EFV/FTC/TDF) among virologically suppressed, HIV-1-infected subjects. Eligible subjects on stable antiretroviral therapy (ART) with HIV-1 RNA less than 200 copies per milliliter for 3 months or more were stratified by prior protease inhibitor (PI)- or non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based therapy and randomized (2:1) to EFV/FTC/TDF or to stay on their baseline regimen (SBR). Patient-reported measures were quality of life (QOL; SF-36 [version 2]), treatment adherence (visual analogue scale), preference of medication (POM), perceived ease of the regimen for condition (PERC), and a 20-item HIV symptom index. Overall, 203 subjects were randomized to EFV/FTC/TDF and 97 to SBR. Fifty-three percent of subjects had previously received a PI-based regimen; 47% an NNRTI-based therapy. Throughout the study, SF-36 summary scores did not differ significantly from baseline, regardless of previous ART or treatment allocation. Adherence was 96% or more in both groups at baseline and all subsequent study visits. At study conclusion, the EFV/FTC/TDF regimen was considered easier to follow than prior regimens by 97% and 96% of subjects previously receiving PI-based and NNRTI-based therapies, respectively. Overall, 91% of subjects switched to EFV/FTC/TDF indicated a preference over their prior therapy. Switching to EFV/FTC/TDF was associated with transient worsening/emergence of dizziness and sustained improvements in several other HIV-related symptoms. In conclusion, switching virologically suppressed, HIV-1-infected subjects from PI-based or NNRTI-based regimens to EFV/FTC/TDF was associated with maintained QOL and treatment adherence, and improved ease of use and treatment satisfaction. © 2010, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


PubMed | Philadelphia FIGHT., Treatment Research Institute, University of Pennsylvania and University of Maryland College Park
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of child & adolescent substance abuse | Year: 2015

When adolescent substance abuse requires treatment, few parents know which treatment features are important and which treatment programs are effective. There are few resources to help them select appropriate care. We describe early work on an evaluation method and comparative treatment guide for parents based upon the premise that the quality of a program and its potential effectiveness is a function of the number and frequency of evidence-based treatment practices (EBPs) delivered. Thus, we describe the development of and measurement approach for a set of EBPs toward the goal of developing a Consumer Guide to Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment.


PubMed | University of Pennsylvania and Philadelphia FIGHT
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of the International Association of Providers of AIDS Care | Year: 2015

In 2012, the US Food and Drug Administration approved Truvada as a pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for adults at risk of HIV. PrEP is highly effective at preventing HIV when taken daily, but no gold standard exists for consistently administering PrEP to populations at highest risk. The I Am Mens Health program used an innovative methodology to generate adherence to PrEP in 23 mostly young men who have sex with men of color (yMSMc), during a 28-week period from February to September 2013. Adherence was measured using weekly medication pickup rates. The average age of the participants was 21 years, and the majority were black and lived below the poverty line. Time on PrEP ranged from 1 to 28 weeks (2723 person-days), and the weighted average adherence was 73%. The methodology used in this study was preliminarily effective at generating adherence to PrEP among high-risk yMSMc in a community setting and may help inform large-scale future HIV prevention interventions.


Squires K.E.,Thomas Jefferson University | Bekker L.-G.,University of South Africa | Eron J.J.,University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill | Cheng B.,International HIV Partners | And 14 more authors.
AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses | Year: 2013

The racial diversity and gender distribution of HIV-infected patients make it essential to confirm the safety and efficacy of raltegravir in these populations. A multicenter, open-label, single-arm observational study was conducted in a diverse cohort of HIV-infected patients (goals: ≥25% women; ≥50% blacks in the United States), enrolling treatment-experienced patients failing or intolerant to current antiretroviral therapy (ART) and treatment-naive patients (limited to ≤20%). All patients received raltegravir 400 mg b.i.d. in a combination antiretroviral regimen for up to 48 weeks. A total of 206 patients received study treatment at 34 sites in the United States, Brazil, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, and South Africa: 97 (47%) were female and 153 (74%) were black [116 (56%) in the United States]. Of these, 185 patients were treatment experienced: 97 (47%) were failing and 88 (43%) were intolerant to current therapy; 21 patients (10%) were treatment naive. Among treatment-intolerant patients, 55 (63%) had HIV-1 RNA<50 copies/ml at baseline. Overall, 15% of patients discontinued: 13% of men, 18% of women, 14% of blacks, and 17% of nonblacks. At week 48, HIV RNA was <50 copies/ml in 60/94 (64%) patients failing prior therapy, 61/80 (76%) patients intolerant to prior therapy, and 16/21 (76%) treatment-naive patients. Response rates were similar for men vs. women and black vs. nonblack patients. Drug-related clinical adverse events were reported by 8% of men, 18% of women, 14% of blacks, and 9% of nonblacks. After 48 weeks of treatment in a diverse cohort of HIV-infected patients, raltegravir was generally safe and well tolerated with potent efficacy regardless of gender or race. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


Azzoni L.,Wistar Institute | Foulkes A.S.,University of Massachusetts Amherst | Liu Y.,University of Massachusetts Amherst | Li X.,BG Medicine | And 11 more authors.
PLoS Medicine | Year: 2012

Background: Global programs of anti-HIV treatment depend on sustained laboratory capacity to assess treatment initiation thresholds and treatment response over time. Currently, there is no valid alternative to CD4 count testing for monitoring immunologic responses to treatment, but laboratory cost and capacity limit access to CD4 testing in resource-constrained settings. Thus, methods to prioritize patients for CD4 count testing could improve treatment monitoring by optimizing resource allocation. Methods and Findings: Using a prospective cohort of HIV-infected patients (n = 1,956) monitored upon antiretroviral therapy initiation in seven clinical sites with distinct geographical and socio-economic settings, we retrospectively apply a novel prediction-based classification (PBC) modeling method. The model uses repeatedly measured biomarkers (white blood cell count and lymphocyte percent) to predict CD4 + T cell outcome through first-stage modeling and subsequent classification based on clinically relevant thresholds (CD4 + T cell count of 200 or 350 cells/μl). The algorithm correctly classified 90% (cross-validation estimate = 91.5%, standard deviation [SD] = 4.5%) of CD4 count measurements <200 cells/μl in the first year of follow-up; if laboratory testing is applied only to patients predicted to be below the 200-cells/μl threshold, we estimate a potential savings of 54.3% (SD = 4.2%) in CD4 testing capacity. A capacity savings of 34% (SD = 3.9%) is predicted using a CD4 threshold of 350 cells/μl. Similar results were obtained over the 3 y of follow-up available (n = 619). Limitations include a need for future economic healthcare outcome analysis, a need for assessment of extensibility beyond the 3-y observation time, and the need to assign a false positive threshold. Conclusions: Our results support the use of PBC modeling as a triage point at the laboratory, lessening the need for laboratory-based CD4 + T cell count testing; implementation of this tool could help optimize the use of laboratory resources, directing CD4 testing towards higher-risk patients. However, further prospective studies and economic analyses are needed to demonstrate that the PBC model can be effectively applied in clinical settings. © 2012 Azzoni et al.

Loading Philadelphia FIGHT collaborators
Loading Philadelphia FIGHT collaborators