Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Monmouth Jct., NJ, United States

Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 998.41K | Year: 2014

Not Available


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 659.19K | Year: 2015

The broader impact/commercial potential of this Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project will be to provide researchers and educators a powerful device to monitor biochemical reactions and physical conditions inside living cells in real time. The probe, which is microscopic in size and powered by incoming light, will be inserted into living cells and will report parameters such as pH and concentration of selected molecules via radio transmissions to a nearby receiver. The transmission will contain both the identity of each cell and the parameter(s) being recorded-hence it will be possible to monitor many cells simultaneously. The ?radio p-Chip? will greatly advance the science of probing cell physiology and create a new area in basic and applied research by providing scientists the ability to study localized functions within living cells. As such, it will be a powerful new tool for advancing knowledge in the fields of mechanisms of disease, drug discovery, and control of biochemical functions, metabolism and other areas. The radio p-Chip and receivers are projected to be low enough in cost that they will also become scientific tools for students to study cell physiology and thus become incorporated into educational curricula. The proposed project will result in a system that will, for the first time in history, allow scientists to monitor conditions in a living cell with a device that will not interfere with normal functions including movement. The system will be based the current p-Chip, the world?s smallest microtransponder that continuously emits a radio signal with an identification number (ID) when illuminated with light. The p-Chip is used today to tag, track and authenticate a wide variety of objects. In order to realize the radio p-Chip, the current version of the chip will be shrunk by a factor of 10, and a variety of sensors will be added to its surface. Once complete, the radio p-Chip will be able to alternately transmit its ID and sensor value continuously to a nearby receiver. The receiver will process the signal for further use by the operator. In parallel, a series of tools will be developed to reliably implant the chips into living cells. In order to accomplish the goals of the project, PharmaSeq will combine leading edge technologies in semiconductor device design and fabrication, advanced sensor technology, digital and analogue electronics, optics and software.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 149.99K | Year: 2013

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project aims at developing a Radio p-Chip, the first microchip with a sensor that can be injected into live cells, and transmit information from within without a physical connection. The design combines elements of laser light-activation of the p-Chip, a novel device that transmits the chips serial number via radio signals, with enhancements to monitor events by adding a sensor. The target dimensions for the Radio p-Chip are suitable for investigations of large cells. The on-board sensor will gather information about real-time physiological conditions in the cell and transmit it along with the serial number identifying the cell itself. The information will be transmitted to a reading station that will collect data related to the identity of the cell, as well as the reported conditions from the sensor. The main goals of the Phase I project are to 1) design, build and test the fully functional prototype of the Radio p-Chip; 2) implant the device into a living mammalian cell and demonstrate its function; and 3) build and test components of a future version of the chip. The device envisioned is one part of a system incorporating, in addition to the chip, a custom-designed receiver and antenna system, the stimulus apparatus, devices to implant the chip into cells, and associated firmware and application software.

The broader impact/commercial potential of this project will be felt in a wide variety of applications, including the readout of key physiological characteristics, ID-tagging of individual cells and tracking their history, tagging embryos, flow cytometry and process monitoring. All research to date with living cells relies upon indirect or intrusive methods that almost always effect what is being measured. The Radio p-Chip will be superior in both performance and cost and will have a wide commercial impact. The development of a Radio p-Chip will provide a powerful new tool for cell biology and in particular for the in vivo studying of a wide variety of human diseases and have implications for drug discovery and in vitro diagnostics.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 272.36K | Year: 2012

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The development of circulating auto-antibodies to tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) has been observed at early cancer stages. TAA auto-antibodies are attractive as diagnostic markers because they are stable and persistent in cancerous conditions yet minimally present in normal individuals and most noncancerous conditions. However, the identification of auto-antibodies specific for a particular type of cancer is complicated due to the relatively low-abundance of an individual antibody within the complexity of the human proteome. The purpose of the present project is to develop an approach to detect auto-antibodies to tumor-associated antigens using an encoded combinatorial peptide library synthesized on PharmaSeq's light-activated radio-frequency p-Chips. Preparing the combinatorial library on the p-Chip platform serves two purposes: 1) to enrich for low-abundance proteins based on established principles of solid-phase affinity adsorption and 2) to rapidly identify the affinity ligand on each chip based on the encoded ID. The main project goal is to synthesize an RFID-encoded peptide library consisting of several thousands of random tetramers using the split-and-mix method. We will use a high speed fluidics-based analytical instrument previously developed by PharmaSeq to identify p-Chips carrying specific peptides with affinity to human auto- antibodies. In addition we will quantitatively characterize differences in immunoglobulin profiles between early stage ovarian andbreast cancer patient and normal control samples. The methods developed will enable, for the first time, a true encoded one- particle-one-compound high throughput library synthesis and screening method that is capable of direct translation as a clinical diagnostic platform. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: Auto-antibodies generated against tumor-associated antigens show great potential for the accurate, early diagnosis of cancer but identifying antibodies specific to a particular type of cancer is challenging, requiring a sensitive, high-throughput system that can discriminate key biomarkers against a high protein load. The implementation of an RFID- encoded combinatorial peptide library with PharmaSeq's light-activated p-Chip system will enable the simultaneous enrichment and identification of clinically-relevant biomarkers on a unified, high-throughput platform.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: SMALL BUSINESS PHASE II | Award Amount: 796.99K | Year: 2014

The broader impact/commercial potential of this Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project will be to provide researchers and educators a powerful device to monitor biochemical reactions and physical conditions inside living cells in real time. The probe, which is microscopic in size and powered by incoming light, will be inserted into living cells and will report parameters such as pH and concentration of selected molecules via radio transmissions to a nearby receiver. The transmission will contain both the identity of each cell and the parameter(s) being recorded-hence it will be possible to monitor many cells simultaneously. The ?radio p-Chip? will greatly advance the science of probing cell physiology and create a new area in basic and applied research by providing scientists the ability to study localized functions within living cells. As such, it will be a powerful new tool for advancing knowledge in the fields of mechanisms of disease, drug discovery, and control of biochemical functions, metabolism and other areas. The radio p-Chip and receivers are projected to be low enough in cost that they will also become scientific tools for students to study cell physiology and thus become incorporated into educational curricula.

The proposed project will result in a system that will, for the first time in history, allow scientists to monitor conditions in a living cell with a device that will not interfere with normal functions including movement. The system will be based the current p-Chip, the world?s smallest microtransponder that continuously emits a radio signal with an identification number (ID) when illuminated with light. The p-Chip is used today to tag, track and authenticate a wide variety of objects. In order to realize the radio p-Chip, the current version of the chip will be shrunk by a factor of 10, and a variety of sensors will be added to its surface. Once complete, the radio p-Chip will be able to alternately transmit its ID and sensor value continuously to a nearby receiver. The receiver will process the signal for further use by the operator. In parallel, a series of tools will be developed to reliably implant the chips into living cells. In order to accomplish the goals of the project, PharmaSeq will combine leading edge technologies in semiconductor device design and fabrication, advanced sensor technology, digital and analogue electronics, optics and software.

Discover hidden collaborations