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Montréal, Canada

Zhuo Y.,Merck And Co. | Gauthier J.-Y.,Pharmascience | Black W.C.,Kaneq Pharma Inc. | Percival M.D.,Inception Sciences | Duong L.T.,Merck And Co.
Bone | Year: 2014

The cathepsin K (CatK) inhibitor odanacatib (ODN) is currently being developed for the treatment of osteoporosis. In clinical trials, efficacy and resolution of effect of ODN treatment on bone turnover biomarkers and accrued bone mass have been demonstrated. Here, we examine the effects of continuing treatment and discontinuation of ODN versus alendronate (ALN) on osteoclast (OC) function. First, accessibility and reversible engagement of active CatK in intracellular vesicles and resorption lacunae of actively resorbing OCs were demonstrated by the selective and reversible CatK inhibitors, BODIPY-L-226 (IC50=39nM) and L-873,724 (IC50=0.5nM). Next, mature human OCs on bone slices were treated with vehicle, ODN, or ALN for 2days, followed by either continuing with the same treatment, or replacement of the inhibitors by vehicle for additional times as specified per experimental conditions. Maintaining OCs on ODN or ALN significantly reduced CTx-I release compared to vehicle controls. However, only the treatment of OCs with ODN resulted in the formation of small shallow discrete resorption pits, retention of intracellular vesicles enriched with CatK and other lysosomal enzymes, increase in 1-CTP release and number of TRAP(+) OCs. Upon discontinuation of ODN treatment, OCs rapidly resumed bone resorption activity, as demonstrated by a return of OC functional markers (CTx-I, 1-CTP), cell number and size, morphology and number of resorption pits, and vesicular secretion of CatK toward the respective vehicle levels. As expected, discontinuation of ALN did not reverse the treatment-related inhibition of OC activity in the time frame of the experiment. In summary, this study demonstrated rapid kinetics of inhibition and reversibility of the effects of ODN on OC bone resorption, that differentiated the cellular mechanism of CatK inhibition from that of the bisphosphate antiresorptive ALN. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.. Source


Fluhler E.,Pfizer | Hayes R.,MPI Research | Garofolo F.,Algorithme Pharma Inc. | Dumont I.,Algorithme Pharma Inc. | And 39 more authors.
Bioanalysis | Year: 2014

The 2014 8th Workshop on Recent Issues in Bioanalysis (8th WRIB), a 5-day full immersion in the evolving field of bioanalysis, took place in Universal City, California, USA. Close to 500 professionals from pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical companies, contract research organizations and regulatory agencies worldwide convened to share, review, discuss and agree on approaches to address current issues of interest in bioanalysis. The topics covered included both small and large molecules, and involved LCMS, hybrid LBA/LCMS, LBA approaches and immunogenicity. From the prolific discussions held during the workshop, specific recommendations are presented in this 2014 White Paper. As with the previous years' editions, this paper acts as a practical tool to help the bioanalytical community continue advances in scientific excellence, improved quality and better regulatory compliance. Due to its length, the 2014 edition of this comprehensive White Paper has been divided into three parts for editorial reasons. This publication (Part 1) covers the recommendations for small molecule bioanalysis using LCMS. Part 2 (Hybrid LBA/LCMS, Electronic Laboratory Notebook and Regulatory Agencies' input) and Part 3 (Large molecules bioanalysis using LBA and Immunogenicity) will be published in the upcoming issues of Bioanalysis. © 2014 Future Science Ltd. Source


Dufield D.,Pfizer | Neubert H.,Pfizer | Garofolo F.,Algorithme Pharma Inc. | Kirkovsky L.,Pfizer | And 48 more authors.
Bioanalysis | Year: 2014

The 2014 8th Workshop on Recent Issues in Bioanalysis (8th WRIB), a 5-day full immersion in the evolving field of bioanalysis, took place in Universal City, California, USA. Close to 500 professionals from pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical companies, contract research organizations and regulatory agencies worldwide convened to share, review, discuss and agree on approaches to address current issues of interest in bioanalysis. The topics covered included both small and large molecules, and involved LCMS, hybrid LBA/LCMS, LBA approaches and immunogenicity. From the prolific discussions held during the workshop, specific recommendations are presented in this 2014 White Paper. As with the previous years' editions, this paper acts as a practical tool to help the bioanalytical community continue advances in scientific excellence, improved quality and better regulatory compliance. Due to its length, the 2014 edition of this comprehensive White Paper has been divided into three parts for editorial reasons. This publication (Part 2) covers the recommendations for Hybrid LBA/LCMS, Electronic Laboratory Notebook and Regulatory Agencies' Input. Part 1 (Small molecules bioanalysis using LCMS) was published in the Bioanalysis issue 6(22) and Part 3 (Large molecules bioanalysis using LBA and Immunogenicity) will be published in the Bioanalysis issue 6(24). © 2014 Future Science Ltd. Source


Stevenson L.,Biogen Idec | Garofolo F.,Algorithme Pharma Inc. | Desilva B.,Bristol Myers Squibb | Dumont I.,Algorithme Pharma Inc. | And 57 more authors.
Bioanalysis | Year: 2013

The 2013 7th Workshop on Recent Issues in Bioanalysis was held in Long Beach, California, USA, where close to 500 professionals from pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical companies, CROs and regulatory agencies convened to discuss current topics of interest in bioanalysis. These 'hot' topics, which covered both small and large molecules, were the starting point for fruitful exchanges of knowledge, and sharing of ideas among speakers, panelists and attendees. The discussions led to specific recommendations pertinent to bioanalytical science. Such as the previous editions, this 2013 White Paper addresses important bioanalytical issues and provides practical answers to the topics presented, discussed and agreed upon by the global bioanalytical community attending the 7th Workshop on Recent Issues in Bioanalysis. © 2013 Future Science Ltd. Source


Liu J.,University of Michigan | Campbell C.,University of Michigan | Nam H.K.,University of Michigan | Caron A.,Pharmascience | And 3 more authors.
Bone | Year: 2015

Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is an inborn-error-of-metabolism disorder characterized by deficient bone and tooth mineralization due to loss-of function mutations in the gene (Alpl) encoding tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP). Alpl-/- mice exhibit many characteristics seen in infantile HPP including long bone and tooth defects, vitamin B6 responsive seizures and craniosynostosis. Previous reports demonstrated that a mineral-targeted form of TNAP rescues long bone, vertebral and tooth mineralization defects in Alpl-/- mice. Here we report that enzyme replacement with mineral-targeted TNAP (asfotase-alfa) also prevents craniosynostosis (the premature fusion of cranial bones) and additional craniofacial skeletal abnormalities in Alpl-/- mice. Craniosynostosis, cranial bone volume and density, and craniofacial shape abnormalities were assessed by microscopy, histology, digital caliper measurements and micro CT. We found that craniofacial shape defects, cranial bone mineralization and craniosynostosis were corrected in Alpl-/- mice injected daily subcutaneously starting at birth with recombinant enzyme. Analysis of Alpl-/- calvarial cells indicates that TNAP deficiency leads to aberrant osteoblastic gene expression and diminished proliferation. Some but not all of these cellular abnormalities were rescued by treatment with inorganic phosphate. These results confirm an essential role for TNAP in craniofacial skeletal development and demonstrate the efficacy of early postnatal mineral-targeted enzyme replacement for preventing craniofacial abnormalities including craniosynostosis in murine infantile HPP. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. Source

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