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Monastir, Tunisia

Elaissi A.,Pharmacognosy Laboratory | Medini H.,Pharmacognosy Laboratory | Khouja M.L.,INGREF | Simmonds M.,Royal Botanic Gardens | And 4 more authors.
Chemistry and Biodiversity | Year: 2010

Hydrodistillation of the dried leaves of eleven species of the genus Eucalyptus L'HÉR., i.e., E. astringens MAIDEN, E. camaldulensis DEHNH., E. diversifolia BONPL., E. falcata TURCZ., E. ficifolia F. MUELL., E. gomphocephala DC., E. lehmannii (SCHAUER) BENTH., E. maculata HOOK., E. platypus HOOK., E. polyanthemos SCHAUER, and E. rudis ENDL., harvested from Korbous arboreta (region of Nabeul, northeast of Tunisia) in April 2006, afforded essential oils in yields varying from 0.1±0.1 to 3.8±0.1%, dependent on the species. E. astringens and E. ficifolia showed the highest and the lowest mean percentage of essential oil amongst all the species examined, respectively. Analysis by GC (RI) and GC/ MS allowed the identification of 138 components, representing 74.0 to 99.1% of the total oil. The contents of the different samples varied according to the species. The main components were 1,8-cineole, followed by trans-pinocarveol (1), spathulenol (2), α-pinene, p-cymene, (E,E)-farnesol, cryptone, globulol (3), β-phellandrene, α-terpineol, viridiflorol, and α-eudesmol. The principal-component and the hierarchical-cluster analyses separated the eleven Eucalyptus leaf essential oils into seven groups, each constituting a chemotype. © 2010 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG. Source


Elaissi A.,Pharmacognosy Laboratory | Medini H.,Pharmacognosy Laboratory | Simmonds M.,Royal Botanic Gardens | Lynen F.,Ghent University | And 4 more authors.
Chemistry and Biodiversity | Year: 2011

Leaves of seven species of the genus Eucalyptus L'Hér., viz., E. cladocalyx F. Muell., E. citriodora Hook., E. diversicolor F. Muell., E. fasciculosa F. Muell., E. grandis W. Hill, E. ovata Labill., and E. botryoides Sm., were harvested from Zerniza arboreta (region of Sejnene, northwest of Tunisia) in June 2007. Of the latter species, leaves were collected from trees having two origins, Morocco and Italy. Hydrodistillation of the dried leaves provided essential oils in yields varying from 0.4±0.0 to 3.3±0.1%, according to the species. E. citriodora had the highest mean percentage of essential oil amongst the species examined, whereas the lowest one was obtained for E. botryoides originating from Morocco. Analysis by GC (RI) and GC/MS allowed the identification of 140 compounds, representing 92.5 to 99.4% of the total oil composition. The contents of the different samples varied according to the species. The main components were 1,8-cineole (2), followed by α-pinene (1), p-cymene, borneol, α-terpineol, cryptone, spathulenol, trans-pinocarveol (4), bicyclogermacrene (5), caryophyllene oxide, and β-phellandrene. Principal components analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis separated the eight Eucalyptus leaf essential oils into five groups, each constituting a chemotype. © 2011 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich. Source


Elaissi A.,Pharmacognosy Laboratory | Medini H.,Pharmacognosy Laboratory | Khouja M.L.,INGREF | Simmonds M.,Royal Botanic Gardens | And 4 more authors.
Chemistry and Biodiversity | Year: 2011

Hydrodistillation of the dried leaves of five species of the genus Eucalyptus L'Hér., viz., E. dundasii Maiden, E. globulus Labill., E. kitsoniana Maiden, E. leucoxylon F. Muell., and E. populifolia Hook., harvested from Jbel Abderrahman arboreta (region of Nabeul, northeast of Tunisia) in April 2006, afforded essential oils in yields varying from 0.9±0.3 to 3.8±0.6%, dependent on the species. E. globulus and E. Kitsoniana provided the highest and the lowest percentage of essential oil amongst the species examined, respectively. Analysis by GC (RI) and GC/MS allowed the identification of 127 compounds, representing 93.8 to 98.7% of the total oil composition. The contents of the different samples varied according to the species. The main components were 1,8-cineole (2; 4.7-59.2%), followed by α-pinene (1; 1.9-23.6%), trans-pinocarveol (6; 3.5-21.6%), globulol (8; 4.3-12.8%), p-cymene (3; 0.5-6.7%), α-terpineol (1.5-4.5%), borneol (0.2-4.4%), pinocarvone (1.1-3.8%), aromadendrene (1.4-3.4%), isospathulenol (0.0-1.9%), fenchol (4; 0.1-2.5%), limonene (1.0-2.4%), epiglobulol (0.6-2.1%), viridiflorol (9; 0.8-1.8%), and spathulenol (0.1-1.6%). E. leucoxylon was the richest species in 2. Principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) separated the five Eucalyptus leaf essential oils into four groups, each constituting a chemotype. © 2011 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich. Source


Elaissi A.,Pharmacognosy Laboratory | Medini H.,Pharmacognosy Laboratory | Marzouki H.,Pharmacognosy Laboratory | Khouja M.L.,British Petroleum | And 3 more authors.
Chemistry and Biodiversity | Year: 2010

Hydrodistillation of the dried leaves of twelve species of the genus Eucalyptus L'HÉR., i.e., E. brockwayi C. A. Gardn., E. gracilis F. Muell., E. gillii MAIDEN, E. largiflorens F. MUELL., E. loxophleba BENTH., E. occidentalis ENDL., E. oldfieldii F. MUELL., E. salmonophloia F.MUELL., E. sargentii MAIDEN, E. stricklandii MAIDEN, E. torquata LUEHM., and E. woodwardii MAIDEN, harvested from Hajeb Layoun arboreta (region of Kairouan, central Tunisia) in January 2005, afforded essential oils in yields varying from 0.5±0.1 to 5.7±0.5%, dependent on the species. E. sargentii and E. brockwayi provided the highest and the lowest percentage of essential oil amongst all the species examined, respectively. Analysis by GC (RI) and GC/MS allowed the identification of 133 components, representing 92.9-98.8% of the total oil. The contents of the different samples varied according to the species. The main components were 1,8-cineole, terpinen-4-ol, α-pinene (2), p-cymene, aromadendrene (1), globulol (5), trans-pinocarveol (6), spathulenol (7), β-eudesmol, torquatone (3), and 4-methylpentan-2-yl acetate (8). The principal component analysis and the hierarchical clustering indicated that the volatile leaf oil composition of the twelve Eucalyptus species could be clearly differentiated. © 2010 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG. Source


Elaissi A.,Pharmacognosy Laboratory | Marzouki H.,Pharmacognosy Laboratory | Medini H.,Pharmacognosy Laboratory | Khouja M.L.,British Petroleum | And 4 more authors.
Chemistry and Biodiversity | Year: 2010

Hydrodistillation of the dried leaves of 13 species of the genus Eucalyptus L' HÉR., viz., E. bicostata MAIDEN, BLAKELY & SIMMONDS, E. cinerea F. MUELL. ex BENTH., E. exerta F. MUELL., E. gigantea HOOK. F., E. gunnii HOOK. F., E. macarthurii DEANE & MAIDEN., E. macrorrhyncha F. MUELL., E. maidenii F. MUELL., E. odorata BEHR., E. pauciflora SIEBER ex SPRENGEL, E. sideroxylon A. CUNN. ex WOOLLS, E. tereticornis SM., and E. viminalis LABILL., harvested from Souinet arboreta (region of Ain Draaham, north of Tunisia) in June 2006, afforded essential oils in yields varying from 0.5±0.2 to 3.9±0.4%, dependent on the species. E. cinerea and E. exerta provided the highest and the lowest percentage of essential oil amongst all the species examined, respectively. Analysis by GC (RI) and GC/MS allowed the identification of 142 components, representing 81.5 to 98.9% of the total oil. The contents of the different samples varied according to the species. The main components were 1,8-cineole (1), followed by cryptone, spathulenol (4), p-cymene (2), viridiflorol (6), globulol (7), β-eudesmol, α-terpineol (5), limonene (8), D-piperitone, α-pinene (3), cuminal, and γ-eudesmol. The principal component and the hierarchical cluster analyses separated the 13 Eucalyptus leaf essential oils into three groups, each constituting a chemotype. © 2010 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG. Source

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