Pharma Research Center

Hyderabad, India

Pharma Research Center

Hyderabad, India

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Frey R.,Pharma Research Center | Becker C.,Pharma Research Center | Unger S.,Pharma Research Center | Schmidt A.,Pharma Research Center | And 2 more authors.
Pulmonary Circulation | Year: 2016

Renal impairment is a common comborbidity in patients with pulmonary hypertension. The breakdown of riociguat, an oral soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator used to treat pulmonary hypertension, may be affected by smoking because polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in tobacco smoke induce expression of one of the metabolizing enzymes, CYP1A1. Two nonrandomized, nonblinded studies were therefore performed to investigate the pharmacokinetics and safety of a single oral dose of riociguat 1.0 mg in individuals with mild, moderate, or severe renal impairment compared with age-, weight-, and sex-matched healthy controls, including either smokers and nonsmokers (study I) or nonsmokers alone (study II). Pharmacokinetic analyses focused on the integrated per-protocol data set of both studies (N = 63). In patients with renal impairment, the renal clearance of riociguat was reduced and its terminal half-life prolonged compared with those in healthy controls. There was a monotonic relationship between creatinine clearance on treatment day and riociguat renal clearance (R2 = 0.62). However, increased riociguat exposure with decreasing renal function was not strictly proportional. Riociguat exposure appeared to be greater in nonsmokers than in the combined population of smokers and nonsmokers, irrespective of renal function. Adverse events were mild to moderate and in line with the mode of action of riociguat. No serious adverse events occurred. In conclusion, renal impairment was associated with reduced riociguat clearance compared with that in controls; however, riociguat exposure in patients with renal impairment was highly variable, and ranges overlapped with those observed in healthy controls. © 2016 by the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute. All rights reserved.


Saleh S.,Pharma Research Center | Becker C.,Pharma Research Center | Frey R.,Pharma Research Center | Muck W.,Pharma Research Center
Pulmonary Circulation | Year: 2016

This analysis aimed to characterize the pharmacokinetics (PK) and PK/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) relationship of riociguat and its metabolite M1 in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) or pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Blood samples were collected in two phase 3 studies-PATENT-1 (Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Soluble Guanylate Cyclase-Stimulator Trial 1; 12 weeks; PAH) and CHEST-1 (Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension Soluble Guanylate Cyclase-Stimulator Trial 1; 16 weeks; CTEPH)-and long-term extensions. Patients were initially randomized to receive placebo or riociguat, and they received riociguat in the extensions. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling was used to develop a population PK model describing riociguat PK. PK/PD relationships were investigated by comparing derived PK parameters with changes in PD parameters. Covariate analyses included smoking status, bosentan comedication, bilirubin levels, and baseline creatinine clearance. The PK of riociguat/M1 was described by a one-compartment model. Mean population estimates for riociguat absorption rate constant, clearance, and volume of distribution were 2.17/h, 1.81 L/h, and 32.3 L, respectively; for M1 they were 0.258/h, 3.16 L/h, and 124 L. Interindividual variability was moderate for riociguat and moderate to high for M1. There was no evidence of time- or dose-dependent changes in riociguat/M1 PK. Riociguat clearance was higher in smokers (120% increase) and bosentan-treated patients (36% increase) than in nonsmokers and those not receiving bosentan. There was an inverse correlation between bilirubin and riociguat clearance. In PK/PD analyses, 6-minute walk distance was related to hemodynamic parameters, particularly pulmonary vascular resistance. Riociguat PK were described by a one-compartment model. Effects of covariates on riociguat and M1 PK were established, and a PK/PD relationship was demonstrated. (ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers: PATENT-1, NCT00810693; PATENT-2, NCT00863681; CHEST-1, NCT00855465; CHEST-2, NCT00910429.) © 2016 by the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute. All rights reserved.


Saleh S.,Pharma Research Center | Frey R.,Pharma Research Center | Becker C.,Pharma Research Center | Unger S.,Pharma Research Center | And 2 more authors.
Pulmonary Circulation | Year: 2016

Riociguat is approved for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Some patients have difficulty swallowing tablets; therefore, 2 randomized, nonblinded, crossover studies compared the relative bioavailability of riociguat oral suspensions and immediate-release (IR) tablet and of crushed-tablet preparations versus whole IR tablet. In study 1, 30 healthy subjects received 5 single riociguat doses: 0.3 and 2.4 mg (0.15 mg/mL suspensions), 0.15 mg (0.03 mg/mL), and 1.0 mg (whole IR tablet) under fasted conditions and 2.4 mg (0.15 mg/mL) after a high-fat, high-calorie American-style breakfast. In study 2, 25 healthy men received 4 single 2.5-mg doses: whole IR tablet and crushed IR tablet suspended in applesauce and water, respectively, under fasted conditions, and whole IR tablet after a continental breakfast. In study 1, dose-normalized pharmacokinetics of riociguat oral suspensions and 1.0-mg whole IR tablet were similar in fasted conditions; 90% confidence intervals for riociguat area under the curve (AUC) to dose and mean maximum concentration (Cmax) to dose were within bioequivalence criteria. After food, dosenormalized AUC and Cmax decreased by 15% and 38%, respectively. In study 2, riociguat exposure was similar for all preparations; AUC ratios for crushed-IR-tablet preparations to whole IR tablet were within bioequivalence criteria. The Cmax increased by 17% for crushed IR tablet in water versus whole IR tablet. Food intake decreased Cmax of the whole tablet by 16%, with unaltered AUC versus fasted conditions. Riociguat bioavailability was similar between the oral suspensions and the whole IR tablet; exposure was similar between whole IR tablet and crushed-IR-tablet preparations. Minor food effects were observed. Results suggest that riociguat formulations are interchangeable. © 2016 by the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute. All rights reserved.


Becker C.,Pharma Research Center | Frey R.,Pharma Research Center | Unger S.,Pharma Research Center | Artmeier-Brandt U.,Pharma Research Center | And 2 more authors.
Pulmonary Circulation | Year: 2016

Riociguat, a soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator, is a novel therapy for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension. Riociguat bioavailability is reduced in neutral versus acidic conditions and therefore may be affected by concomitant use of medications that increase gastric pH. The effect of coadministration of the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole or the antacid AlOH/MgOH on the pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of riociguat 2.5 mg was characterized in two open-label, randomized, crossover studies in healthy males. In study 1, subjects pretreated for 4 days with omeprazole 40 mg received cotreatment with omeprazole plus riociguat or riociguat alone (no pretreatment) on day 5 (n = 12). In study 2, subjects received cotreatment with 10 mL AlOH/MgOH plus riociguat or riociguat alone (n = 12). Pre- and cotreatment with omeprazole decreased riociguat bioavailability (mean decreases in area under the plasma concentration-time curve [AUC] and maximum concentration in plasma [Cmax] were 26% and 35%, respectively). Cotreatment with AlOH/MgOH resulted in greater decreases in riociguat bioavailability (mean decreases in AUC and Cmax were 34% and 56%, respectively). In both studies, most adverse events (AEs) were of mild intensity, and no serious AEs were reported. No additional safety signals were identified. Treatment with riociguat, with or without omeprazole or AlOH/MgOH, was well tolerated, with a good safety profile. Owing to the resulting increase of gastric pH, riociguat bioavailability is reduced by coadministration with AlOH/MgOH and, to a lesser extent, by coadministration with omeprazole. Thus, antacids should not be administered within an hour of receiving riociguat, but no dose adjustment is required for coadministration of proton pump inhibitors. © 2016 by the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute. All rights reserved.


Frey R.,Pharma Research Center | Reber M.,Pharma Research Center | Kratzschmar J.,Pharma Research Center | Unger S.,Pharma Research Center | And 2 more authors.
Pulmonary Circulation | Year: 2016

In preclinical studies, drugs that increase cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels have been shown to influence platelet function/ aggregation; however, the effect of riociguat on human platelets is unclear. Aspirin, a platelet inhibitor, is likely to be given concomitantly in patients receiving riociguat. It is therefore important to establish clinically whether (1) riociguat affects platelet function and (2) aspirin and riociguat interact. This randomized, open-label, crossover study investigated potential pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions between these drugs in healthy male volunteers (N = 18). There were 3 treatment regimens: a single morning dose of riociguat 2.5 mg, aspirin 500 mg on 2 consecutive mornings, and both treatments together, with riociguat given on the second morning. Fifteen participants were available for pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic analysis. There was no effect of riociguat alone on bleeding time, platelet aggregation, and serum thromboxane B2 levels. The effects of aspirin on these parameters were not influenced by concomitant administration of riociguat. The pharmacokinetic profile of riociguat showed interindividual variability, which was independent of aspirin coadministration. Six of 17 participants available for safety evaluation reported at least 1 treatment-emergent adverse event. All adverse events were of mild severity, apart from 1 report of moderate headache. No serious adverse events occurred. In conclusion, riociguat demonstrated no clinically relevant pharmacodynamic or pharmacokinetic interactions with aspirin at the doses used in this study in healthy men; coadministration of riociguat and aspirin should therefore not require any dose adjustment for either drug. © 2016 by the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute. All rights reserved.


Saleh S.,Pharma Research Center | Becker C.,Pharma Research Center | Frey R.,Pharma Research Center | Muck W.,Pharma Research Center
Pulmonary Circulation | Year: 2016

This population pharmacokinetics (PK) analysis characterized the PK of the oral soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator riociguat in patients with renal or hepatic impairment and determined whether smoking affects riociguat dosing. Two phase 1 studies were performed in patients with renal impairment (n = 72, of whom 11 were smokers), and two were performed in those with hepatic impairment (n = 64, of whom 12 were smokers). Plasma and urine samples were collected after a single oral dose of riociguat 1.0 or 0.5 mg. Nonlinear mixedeffects modeling was used to develop a combined, two-compartment population PK model for riociguat and its main metabolite, M1. Riociguat and M1 clearance was split into renal and nonrenal parts; the nonrenal part for riociguat was divided into metabolism to M1 and a metabolic (nonrenal) part. Total clearance of riociguat was 1.912 L/h. The main route of riociguat clearance is metabolism to M1 (1.2 L/h). In this model, hepatic function biomarkers or Child-Pugh classification had no significant effect on riociguat or M1 clearance. Nonrenal (nonmetabolism) riociguat clearance was similar in all groups. Renal clearance (0.242 L/h) contributed less to riociguat total clearance, mainly determined by glomerular filtration (0.174 L/h). Renal impairment reduced riociguat and M1 clearance. Hepatic or renal impairment had limited effects on total exposure to riociguat. However, individual dose adjustment of riociguat should be administered with particular care in patients with moderate hepatic or renal impairment. Riociguat is not recommended in severe hepatic or renal impairment. Smoking reduced riociguat exposure by significantly increasing metabolism to M1. © 2016 by the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute. All rights reserved.


Frey R.,Pharma Research Center | Unger S.,Pharma Research Center | van der Mey D.,Pharma Research Center | Becker C.,Pharma Research Center | And 3 more authors.
Pulmonary Circulation | Year: 2016

Female patients requiring treatment for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are advised to avoid pregnancy because of the high associated mortality rate. Oral contraception is one of the main methods of preventing pregnancy in this context, mandating pharmacokinetic and safety studies for new agents in this setting. Riociguat is a soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator approved for treatment of PAH and inoperable and persistent or recurrent chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. This single-center, randomized, nonblinded study involving healthy postmenopausal women investigated the effect of riociguat on plasma concentrations of levonorgestrel (0.15 mg) and ethinylestradiol (0.03 mg) in a combined oral contraceptive. Treatment A was a single oral tablet of levonorgestrel-ethinylestradiol. In treatment B, subjects received 2.5 mg riociguat 3 times daily for 12 days. On the eighth day, they also received a single oral tablet of levonorgestrel-ethinylestradiol. Subjects received both regimens in a crossover design. There was no change in area under the plasma concentration-time curves of levonorgestrel or ethinylestradiol or maximum concentration in plasma (Cmax) of levonorgestrel during combined administration versus levonorgestrel-ethinylestradiol alone. A 20% increase in the Cmax of ethinylestradiol was noted during coadministration; this is not anticipated to adversely impact the contraceptive efficacy or to require any dose adjustment for ethinylestradiol. Plasma concentrations and exposures of riociguat were within the expected range and were not influenced by coadministration with levonorgestrelethinylestradiol. Combined treatment was safe and well tolerated. In conclusion, riociguat did not change the exposure to levonorgestrel or ethinylestradiol relative to oral contraceptive administered alone. © 2016 by the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute. All rights reserved.


Frey R.,Pharma Research Center | Saleh S.,Pharma Research Center | Becker C.,Pharma Research Center | Muck W.,Pharma Research Center
Pulmonary Circulation | Year: 2016

Riociguat is a soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator approved for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study investigated the pharmacokinetics of riociguat and its metabolite M1 in young (18-45 years) and elderly (64.5-80 years) healthy volunteers of both sexes to assist planning of the dose regimens for clinical trials. The data were also used to draw comparisons with the effects of age and sex on riociguat pharmacokinetics in patients with PAH and CTEPH from the riociguat phase 3 trials, PATENT and CHEST. Volunteers received an oral dose of either riociguat 2.5 mg or placebo, and the concentrations of riociguat and M1 in blood and urine samples were determined using mass spectrometry. In elderly healthy volunteers, overall riociguat and M1 exposure tended to be higher than in young healthy volunteers (P > 0.05), partly because of reduced renal clearance (approximately 28% reduction) and differences in body weight. Although the mean maximum concentrations of riociguat and M1 were significantly higher in women than in men (35% and 50% higher, respectively), total exposure was similar. Despite differences in riociguat and M1 pharmacokinetics, riociguat was well tolerated with a comparable safety profile across all subgroups, suggesting that differences in drug exposure due to age or sex were not sufficient to warrant a dose adjustment in clinical trials. Furthermore, similar pharmacokinetics were observed in patients with PAH and CTEPH. However, particular care should be exercised during individual dose titration of riociguat in elderly patients. © 2016 by the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute. All rights reserved.


Frey R.,Pharma Research Center | Becker C.,Pharma Research Center | Unger S.,Pharma Research Center | Schmidt A.,Pharma Research Center | And 2 more authors.
Pulmonary Circulation | Year: 2016

Riociguat, a soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator developed for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension, is metabolized in part by the liver. Expression of one of the metabolizing enzymes, CYP1A1, is induced by aromatic hydrocarbons in tobacco smoke. Two nonrandomized, nonblinded studies were conducted to investigate the pharmacokinetics of riociguat in individuals with mild (Child-Pugh A) or moderate (Child-Pugh B) hepatic impairment associated with liver cirrhosis compared with that in age-, weight-, and sex-matched healthy controls: study 1 included smokers and nonsmokers, and study 2 included nonsmokers only. Data from these studies were integrated for analysis. All participants (N = 64) received a single oral dose of riociguat 1.0 mg. Riociguat exposure was significantly higher in individuals with Child-Pugh B hepatic impairment than in healthy controls (ratio: 153% [90% confidence interval: 103%-228%]) but was similar in those with Child-Pugh A hepatic impairment and controls. The half-life of the riociguat metabolite M1 was prolonged in patients with Child-Pugh B or A hepatic impairment compared with that in controls by approximately 43% and 24%, respectively. Impaired hepatic function was associated with higher riociguat exposure in nonsmokers compared with the population of smokers and nonsmokers combined. Riociguat’s safety profile was similar in individuals with impaired or normal liver function. In conclusion, moderate hepatic impairment was associated with increased riociguat exposure compared with that in controls, probably as a result of reduced clearance of the metabolite M1. This suggests that dose titration of riociguat should be administered with particular care in patients with moderate hepatic impairment. © 2016 by the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute. All rights reserved.


Becker C.,Pharma Research Center | Frey R.,Pharma Research Center | Hesse C.,Pharma Research Center | Unger S.,Pharma Research Center | And 2 more authors.
Pulmonary Circulation | Year: 2016

Riociguat (BAY 63-2521) is the first member of a novel class of compounds, the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) stimulators. Riociguat has a dual mode of action: it sensitizes sGC to endogenous nitric oxide (NO) and stimulates sGC independent of NO availability. To characterize the biopharmaceutical properties of riociguat, including absolute bioavailability, food interactions, and dose proportionality, riociguat (intravenous/oral) was administered to healthy male subjects in 3 open-label, randomized, crossover studies: absolute bioavailability (1 mg; n = 22), food effect (2.5 mg; n = 23), and dose proportionality (0.5-2.5 mg; n = 24). Absolute bioavailability was 94% (95% confidence interval [CI], 83%-107%). Riociguat absorption was delayed by a high-fat breakfast with little effect on the extent of absorption (area under the concentration-time curve [AUC]fed: AUCfasted, 88% [90% CI, 82%-95%]). Exposure to riociguat was dose proportional over all doses (common slope of AUC, 1.09 [90% CI, 1.04-1.14]; maximum concentration, 0.98 [90% CI, 0.93-1.04]). Intraindividual variability was low; interindividual variability was moderate to high. Riociguat was well tolerated, and adverse events were consistent with the mode of action. In conclusion, riociguat shows complete oral absorption, no clinically relevant food effects, and a dose-proportional increase in systemic exposure (0.5-2.5 mg). These data support the suitability of the individualized dose adjustment scheme employed in the phase 3 clinical studies. © 2016 by the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute. All rights reserved.

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