Edmonton, Canada
Edmonton, Canada

Petro-Canada is a retail and wholesale marketing brand of Suncor Energy. Until 2009, it was a crown corporation of Canada , headquartered at the Petro-Canada Centre in Calgary, Alberta. In August 2009, Petro-Canada merged with Suncor Energy, with Suncor shareholders receiving approximately 60 percent ownership of the combined company and Petro-Canada shareholders receiving approximately 40 percent. The company retained the Suncor Energy name for the merged corporation and its upstream operations. It continues to use the Petro-Canada brand nationwide, except in Newfoundland and Labrador, for downstream retail operations. Wikipedia.


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Trademark
Suncor Energy and Petro Canada | Date: 2011-01-18

automatic transmission fluids.


Trademark
Suncor Energy and Petro Canada | Date: 2011-01-18

Fungicides.


Trademark
Suncor Energy and Petro Canada | Date: 2011-01-04

[ Antifreeze; ] heat transfer system flushing fluids and compressor flushing fluids; heat transfer fluid for industrial use; hydraulic fluid; [ Petrochemicals for use in the manufacture of other chemicals, namely, benzene, toluene and xylene; industrial gases for use in chemical processes as feedstocks, namely, butylenes, propylene; petrochemicals for use in the manufacture of other chemicals, namely, toluene and xylene; preparations and substances for fortifying plants ]. Compressor cleaning fluid for industrial use. Chain oils; [ Crude oil; ] Drill mud oil for use in oil well drilling; Drive train oil; Electrical insulating oil; Heat transfer oil; Heavy duty engine oil; Machine tool lubricant and press oil; Natural gas engine oil; Outboard motor oil; Paper machine oil; Petroleum based coating agent for use in pouring concrete; Propane fuel; butane gas; lubricating oils and greases; two-cycle motor oils; base oils; compressor oils; metal working oils and cutting oils; food grade gear oil and lubricants; gear oils and bearing lubricants; general purpose grease; hydraulic oil; motor oil; turbine oil; way lubricants; saw guide oil; lubricating oils in the nature of process oils; lubricating greases in the nature of rail curve grease; Railway, marine and stationary diesel engine oil; Refrigeration lubricating oil; Rock drill lubricating oil; (( drill rod lubricating oil; )) Snowmobile lubricating oil; Vacuum pump lubricating oil; White mineral oil for use in the manufacture of other products and for industrial use; transmission fluid. Antimicrobial preparations for food grade lubricating oils and greases [ ; Agricultural pesticides in the nature of oils; Fungicides for fortifying plants, for promoting and maintaining plant growth, products for combating maladies of plants in the nature of pesticides; anti-pathogen preparations which invoke an immune system response in plants; pesticides and insecticides, preparations for destroying pests, plant protectants to prevent attack by insects, plant protectants to repel attack by insects, preparations for controlling or destroying insects, preparations for protecting plants against pathogens; Herbicides ]. Electrical insulating oils. [ Asphalt ]. Credit card services.


Trademark
Suncor Energy and Petro Canada | Date: 2011-04-05

Chemical preparations and substances for fortifying plants, for promoting and maintaining plant growth, chemical preparations for combating maladies of plants; and chemical preparations for improving the immune systems of plants. Pesticides, insecticides; plant protectant preparations, namely, pesticides, insecticides and fungicides for destroying, preventing and repelling attacks by insects, pests and fungal pathogens.


Trademark
Suncor Energy and Petro Canada | Date: 2011-04-05

Chemical preparations and substances for fortifying plants, for promoting and maintaining plant growth, chemical preparations for combating maladies of plants; and chemical preparations for improving the immune systems of plants. Pesticides, insecticides; plant protectant preparations, namely, pesticides, insecticides and fungicides for destroying, preventing and repelling attacks by insects, pests and fungal pathogens.


Trademark
Suncor Energy and Petro Canada | Date: 2010-11-09

Herbicides.


Cokar M.,University of Calgary | Graham J.,Petro Canada
SPE Production and Operations | Year: 2010

A simulation study was conducted to examine the effects of changing the landing position of the short production-tubing string relative to the heel of a steam-assisted gravity-drainage (SAGD) production well. A homogeneous discretized wellbore model with the riser section was used in this study. Generally, a reservoir is modeled independently of the wellbore. However, this study models the reservoir and wellbore simultaneously in order to understand their interactions. SAGD performance is affected by many interrelated parameters; however, this paper is focused only on the effects of changing the short production-tubing string relative to the heel of the well. This paper outlines two independent case studies: 1. The first study involves shortening the short production-tubing string relative to the heel of the well. It was found that as the short tubing string was pulled back from the heel of the well, the bitumen-production rate decreased, and the amount of steam produced through the short production-tubing string increased. 2. The second case study outlines the impact of extending the short production-tubing string past the heel of the well on bitumen production and steam/oil ratio (SOR). From this case study, it was found that as the short production-tubing string was pushed past the heel of the well, the bitumen-production rate stayed the same, but the steam-injection rate decreased, which consequently decreased the SOR. It was also observed that a lower pressure differential between the injector and producer well was established when the short production-tubing string was extended. The results for this study will assist SAGD producers in re-evaluating the position of the short production-tubing string and find the most economical position for this string. This paper creates the foundation for further simulation efforts to incorporate a discretized model with the build section coupled to the reservoir. This will allow production engineers to optimize bitumen production by simultaneously simulating the reservoir and wellbore strings together. However, it must be kept in mind that the sensitivity study outlined in this paper only includes different placements of the short production-tubing string while keeping all other parameters constant. More work should be done in order to evaluate the interrelated effects of changing the location of the short production-tubing string with other wellbore and reservoir parameters. Copyright © 2010 Society of Petroleum Engineers.


News Article | October 8, 2015
Site: www.edmontonjournal.com

When Steve Williams first laid eyes on Alberta’s oilsands 14 years ago, he said it struck him as “one of the wonders of the world.” A chemical engineer from Bristol, England, he’d been at Exxon Mobil Corp. for 18 years and ran its largest U.K. refinery. He had come to Alberta to talk to Suncor about joining the company and what was then just the beginning of what would become the oilsands’ phenomenal boom. Over the next decade-and-a-half, the production of synthetic and crude bitumen from Alberta’s Athabasca region would mushroom by nearly 60 per cent, from 1.5 million barrels per day to 2.37 million barrels today. The oilsands future still looked brilliant when, three years ago, Williams was elevated from roles as executive vice president, CFO and COO, to Suncor’s president and CEO. Still, from the beginning, Williams was focused on driving down production costs, repositioning the oilsands pioneer as a low-cost producer. That was far from a widespread obsession at the time — though it has, since last year, become every producer’s preoccupation. Then, oil prices were above US$100 a barrel, oilsands investment was booming, and many new competitors were driving hard to build out as much production growth as possible. Williams was different; he was fixated on the long haul. “The oilsands business is the ultimate marathon,” Williams said at the company’s annual meeting in May 2012, when he took over the company’s controls from the retiring Rick George. “It requires fitness, endurance, strategic pacing and discipline.” It turned out to be astute, preparing Suncor exceptionally well for the oil shock that would strike in summer 2014, and see oil prices stumble to below US$40 a barrel a year later, before reviving slightly last month to just under US$50. And, with other producers caught far less prepared, it also offered Williams a chance to consolidate his company’s dominance over the Alberta oilsands wonder — with Williams not only putting his own stamp on Suncor, but branding a commanding portion of the oilsands with Suncor’s way of running things. As he launched a hostile takeover bid Monday for Canadian Oil Sands Ltd. (COS), the largest shareholder of Syncrude Canada Ltd. — a project neighbour in northern Alberta, and a longtime rival (although Suncor also has a minor equity stake) — Williams pointed out that Suncor is sitting on a cash pile and available credit of $12 billion, and a “fortress balance sheet.” The all-share transaction is valued at $6.6 billion including debt and would increase Suncor’s stake in Syncrude to 49 per cent, from 12 per cent. It was Williams’ second move in a month to expand Suncor’s core oilsands operation. Suncor purchased an additional 10 per cent of the Fort Hills project last month from French major Total S.A. at a distressed price of $310 million, increasing its stake to 50.8 per cent. While others have slowed down or cancelled projects, the $15 billion mining operation is the only one still in construction in the Fort McMurray region and is on track to start producing in late 2017. With the moves, Williams, 59, is out to make Suncor’s low-cost know-how the oilsands’ new strategic advantage amid low oil prices that he believes are not going anywhere anytime soon. Indeed, Suncor has compressed its operating costs to $28 a barrel, and they’re heading lower, while the comparable costs at Syncrude are $52.63 a barrel. “If you look at the way reliability and operating costs are going (at Suncor), it’s a very successful business, even at these low oil prices,” Williams said in an interview this week. And Williams believes that, by taking a majority stake in Syncrude, Suncor can push it to do better. “My plan would be to commit significant resource in an area where we have great expertise,” he said. “Suncor is actively working on … programs of how to improve reliability and how to reduce operating costs in this lower (price) crude world that we are likely to be in for longer.” Until Williams took over, his predecessor had cast a long shadow at Suncor. George, a lawyer and engineer originally from Colorado, enjoyed legendary status after taking an unprofitable oilsands plant in Fort McMurray and growing it into a Canadian giant in 20 years. His style included placing a high value on organic growth and enterprising employees. But when the recession hit, Suncor ran into financial difficulties and merged with Petro-Canada to re-enforce its finances. Williams introduced his own style: Bringing order to the giant mines, steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) facilities, pipelines, upgraders, refineries and gasoline stations that make up Suncor’s integrated oilsands business. He saw opportunity less in growth, and more in making systems work more profitably. Mike Tims, vice-chairman of private investment firm Matco Investments Ltd., notes that companies tend to recruit CEOs that are suited for the prevailing business and economic conditions. “Rick George was the right CEO for the period he was there, which was a period of exceptional growth,” he said. “Clearly the environment has changed a lot, and Steve has sharpened the cost focus.” As Williams put it in 2012, “Growth for the sake of growth doesn’t interest me too much. I’m not focused on getting to a million barrels a day in production by 2020. What I am focused on is achieving strong returns for our shareholders.” But not many outsiders would have anticipated the well-timed cost proficiency that Williams had to offer. Before taking over as CEO, Williams stayed largely out of the spotlight, although, by 2007, he was already being looked at as a potential successor for George. (Mike Ashar, another contender, would wind up being put in charge of Suncor’s strategic growth and energy trading; he then left Suncor to become president of New Brunswick’s Irving Oil Ltd. — which ended with him suing the privately run Irving for wrongful dismissal earlier this year). Williams began making unflinching cuts to reduce costs. In 2013, he pulled the plug on the half-finished Voyageur upgrader project in the face of rising capital costs and the sudden glut of U.S. light oil that was eating into the economics of refining bitumen. At the time, Suncor had already sunk $3.5 billion into Voyageur. He sold Suncor’s natural gas business, among a number of other assets, concentrating the company’s focus on the oilsands. Today, 80 per cent of the company’s 580,000 barrel-a-day production comes from the oilsands. Growth projects were cut into smaller pieces to temper cost inflation. Employees were squeezed into smaller spaces to save on rent. Suncor was among the first companies to announce mass layoffs last January, in the early days of the oil price collapse, explaining it was accelerating its cost-control push to make itself more resilient in the downturn. Williams’ discipline was enough to get the attention of Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway, which sold off a US$3.7 billion stake in Exxon and upped its share of Suncor, making the Alberta company its largest oil holding. Berkshire now holds 22.4 million Suncor shares, or 1.5% of the stock, and is its 11th-largest shareholder. Syncrude, held back by its awkward consortium model (its ownership is shared between Canadian Oil Sands, Imperial Oil, Suncor, Murphy Oil, Japan’s Nippon Oil, and China’s Sinopec and Nexen/CNOOC) began to look like an obvious target for Suncor to impose its discipline on. And Syncrude had been experiencing serious operational challenges in recent years. With capacity to produce 350,000 barrels per day, its average production has been closer to 250,000 due to continuing setbacks, including a recent fire. Williams had already been hinting in recent months that he was on the hunt for a purchase. “There are serious amounts of fire sale or distressed assets on the market, some because other companies’ balance sheets aren’t in good shape, some because they have other reasons for wanting to sell assets,” Williams said last month in a conference call with analysts. “So we’re looking very closely.” By then, Suncor had already approached COS twice, in the spring, to discuss a deal on friendlier terms, and at a higher price, but had been rebuffed by its board. Today, Suncor’s betting that COS is even more distressed: The $11.84 per share that was put on the table in March is now down to just over $9, based on the deal that will give COS shareholders one Suncor share for every four of theirs, and based on Friday’s closing price. COS’s directors remain unpersuaded: they adopted a poison pill Wednesday to fend off Suncor’s advance, as Williams spent the week meeting directly with COS shareholders to sell them on a combination he believes is so compelling that, as he put it, “one plus one equals three.” If the COS bid is successful, Suncor would add about 100,000 barrels a day to its already large oilsands portfolio  and spread its wings across some of the best mining leases around Fort McMurray. There’s always the risk of a competing bid, most likely from Syncrude’s major partner, Imperial Oil, that would force Suncor to consider raising its offer. And even if William convinces COS shareholders and gets control of Syncrude, there will be yet more uncertainties and surprises as he seeks those economies of scale he has his eye on. But whatever the outcome, Williams has made it unequivocally clear that he still sees plenty of value in the oilsands at today’s prices — and that he knows just how to squeeze the most of it out.


News Article | November 2, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

More than 250 athletes and coaches participate in inspiring celebration The Government of Canada, in partnership with the Canadian Olympic and Paralympic Committees, today hosted more than 250 Canadian athletes and coaches in Ottawa and Gatineau to celebrate their achievements at the Rio 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games. The day kicked off with sport fairs at the University of Ottawa and the Centre sportif de Gatineau, where Olympians and Paralympians engaged local elementary school students in various sport activities to encourage physical activity and sport participation. The morning also included Facebook Live sessions with athletes and students from across Canada. The athletes and coaches then attended a luncheon hosted by the Honourable Carla Qualtrough, Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities, where they received their Olympic and Paralympic rings, presented by Teck and Hillberg and Berk. Petro Canada representatives also made a special presentation of the James Worrall Flag Bearer Awards to Rosie McLennan, David Eng and Penny Oleksiak (Aurélie Rivard was unable to attend the event). Finally, the athletes and coaches were welcomed into the House of Commons to be honoured by all members of Parliament, who represent all Canadians across the country. The House rose in extended applause as each athlete paraded across the floor, an honour reserved for only very special guests. "On behalf of all Canadians, the Government of Canada is proud to host our Rio 2016 Olympic and Paralympic athletes and their coaches to celebrate their accomplishments this past summer. The performances of every member of Team Canada made us proud, and now we have the chance to thank them and celebrate the impact they have in inspiring all Canadians, especially our young people, to enjoy the benefits of sport and recreation activities." -The Honourable Carla Qualtrough, Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities "It has been a blast getting to celebrate Canada's achievements with so many Canadian fans and supporters today. The majority of the time we compete and train in a bubble away from the bright lights and cheers of the Games, so getting to come out here and connect with our fellow Canadians who have been behind us the whole way really is the cherry on top of everything. Thank you to Teck for the beautiful rings and thank you to everyone who has supported Team Canada." "It's been so rewarding to be here today with my teammates to share our success and experiences with kids and parliamentarians. An athlete's success is only made possible thanks to the support of our coaches, community and country, and today was a perfect mix of all those. Thank you to the Government of Canada for supporting Canadian athletes and making today's events possible." "Rio 2016 was Canada's best-ever performance, thanks to the hard work and dedication of our country's Olympians who showed us what being Canadian is all about. Congratulations on such an outstanding Games. Thank you to all the students and the Government of Canada for helping our country's athletes celebrate their Rio success in such style." "To all our athletes and coaches, congratulations and well done. Team Canada's athletes are outstanding role models for all Canadians. Our thanks to the Government of Canada for today's fantastic celebration events and the opportunity to help our athletes connect with schoolchildren and inspire the next generation of champions." Follow us on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Instagram and Flickr.

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