Petersime NV.

Zulte, Belgium

Petersime NV.

Zulte, Belgium
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Tong Q.,Lane College | Romanini C.E.B.,Catholic University of Leuven | Exadaktylos V.,Catholic University of Leuven | McGonnell I.M.,Lane College | And 8 more authors.
Livestock Science | Year: 2016

Accurate diagnosis of both the stage of embryonic mortality and the hatch process in incubated eggs is a fundamental component in troubleshooting and hatchery management. However, traditional methods disturb incubation, destroy egg samples, risk contamination, are time and labour-intensive and require specialist knowledge and training. Therefore, a new method to accurately detect embryonic mortality and hatching time would be of significant interest for the poultry industry if it could be done quickly, cheaply and be fully integrated into the process. In this study we have continuously measured individual eggshell temperatures and the corresponding micro-environmental air temperatures throughout the 21 days of incubation using standard low-cost temperature sensors. Moreover, we have quantified the thermal interaction between eggs and air by calculating thermal profile changes (temperature drop time, drop length and drop magnitude) that allowed us to detect four categories of egg status (infertile/early death, middle death, late death and hatch) during incubation. A decision tree induction classification model accurately (93.3%) predicted the status of 105 sampled eggs in comparison to the classical hatch residue breakout analyses. With this study we have provided a major contribution to the optimisation of incubation processes by introducing an alternative method for the currently practiced hatch residue breakout analyses. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.


Bergoug H.,Avian and Rabbit Epidemiology and Welfare Unit | Guinebretiere M.,Avian and Rabbit Epidemiology and Welfare Unit | Tong Q.,Lane College | Roulston N.,Petersime NV | And 10 more authors.
Poultry Science | Year: 2013

This experiment studied the effect of transportation duration of 1-d-old chicks on dehydration, mortality, production performance, and pododermatitis during the growout period. Eggs from the same breeder flock (Ross PM3) were collected at 35, 45, and 56 wk of age, for 3 successive identical experiments. In each experiment, newly hatched chicks received 1 of 3 transportation duration treatments from the hatchery before placement in the on-site rearing facility: no transportation corresponding to direct placement in less than 5 min (T00), or 4 (T04) or 10 h (T10) of transportation. The chicks were housed in 35-m2 pens (650 birds each) and reared until 35 d old. Hematocrit and chick BW were measured on sample chicks before and after transportation. During the growout period, bird weight, feed uptake, and feed conversion ratio were measured weekly until slaughter. Transportation duration affected BW; T00 groups had a significantly higher BW than T04 and T10 transported birds but this effect lasted only until d 21. No clear effect on hematocrit, feed uptake, feed conversion ratio, or mortality was observed for birds transported up to 10 h. The decrease in weight in T10 birds was associated with less severe pododermatitis. Increasing age of the breeder flock was correlated with reduced egg fertility and hatchability, and also with higher quality and BW of hatched chicks. Chicks from older breeders also exhibited reduced mortality during the growout period. © 2013 Poultry Science Association Inc.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-ITN-2008 | Award Amount: 2.47M | Year: 2009

The combination of new technology with biology offers high opportunities for EU in terms of realising and implementing directives in different applications as well as economic terms. The main problem however is that people educated in biology are not aware of the possibilities of modern technology. At the same time technical people developing technology are not participating to the world of bio-processes. The objective is to train biologically educated people to collaborate with technology driven people. In this regard, they will be trained in research, product definition and development, marketing and sales for bio-business in EU. Our goal is to fill the gap of the education that veterinarians, animal scientists and bio-engineers receive introducing them to emerging technologies and lead them to the practical use of their science. This is achieved by making them work as part of a team that is realising a new product for biological processes. Also, the fellows that will be affiliated with academic partners will be encouraged to obtain a PhD and follow the necessary courses by the affiliated doctoral schools. Finally, additional training events have been foreseen to cover the topics that are considered of significant importance. The network will focus on research that will enhance animal welfare and health management. The main areas of interest are behaviour monitoring, disease detection and monitoring, growth monitoring and management. The research outcome will lead to new knowledge in concepts and understanding. Also, mathematical modelling techniques will be used that allow for the results to be quantified whilst providing insight of the biological process. The results of the individual fellows will then be evaluated by the industry and valorised. Researchers that will successfully complete the training program will be able to continue their career skills in different sectors of EU such as industry, civil service, academia, teaching or research institutions.


PubMed | Lane College, Catholic University of Leuven, Petersime N.V. and Avian and Rabbit Epidemiology and Welfare Unit
Type: | Journal: Journal of thermal biology | Year: 2015

Thermodynamic study of incubated eggs is an important component in the optimisation of incubation processes. However, research on the interaction of heat and moisture transfer mechanisms in eggs is rather limited and does not focus on the hatching stage of incubation. During hatch, both the recently hatched chick and the broken eggshell add extra heat and moisture contents to the hatcher environment. In this study, we have proposed a novel way to estimate thermodynamically the amount of water evaporated from a broken eggshell during hatch. The hypothesis of this study considers that previously reported drops in eggshell temperature during hatching of chicks is the result remaining water content evaporating from the eggshell, released on the inner membrane by the recently hatched wet chick, just before hatch. To reproduce this process, water was sprayed on eggshells to mimic the water-fluid from the wet body of a chick. For each sample of eggshell, the shell geometry and weight, surface area and eggshell temperature were measured. Water evaporation losses and convection coefficient were calculated using a novel model approach considering the simultaneous heat and mass transfer profiles in an eggshell. The calculated average convective coefficient was 23.9 7.5 W/m(2) C, similar to previously reported coefficients in literature as a function of 0.5-1m/s air speed range. Comparison between measured and calculated values for the water evaporation showed 68% probability accuracy, associated to the use of an experimentally derived single heat transfer coefficient. The results support our proposed modelling approach of heat and mass transfer mechanisms. Furthermore, by estimating the amount of evaporated water in an eggshell post-hatch, air humidity levels inside the hatcher can be optimised to ensure wet chicks dry properly while not dehydrating early hatching chicks.


Tong Q.,Royal Veterinary College | Romanini C.E.,Catholic University of Leuven | Exadaktylos V.,Catholic University of Leuven | Bahr C.,Catholic University of Leuven | And 7 more authors.
Poultry Science | Year: 2013

Embryonic growth and development is influenced by both endogenous and exogenous factors. The purpose of this review is to discuss the critical stages of chick embryonic development in relation to functional maturation of numerous organ systems, the acquisition of thermoregulation, and the hatching process. In addition, the mechanism of hatching, including sound synchronization and hormonal and environmental stimulation, will be discussed. Finally, the importance of effective hatching synchronization mechanisms will also be highlighted. © 2013 Poultry Science Association Inc.


Romanini C.E.B.,Catholic University of Leuven | Exadaktylos V.,Catholic University of Leuven | Tong Q.,Lane College | McGonnel I.,Lane College | And 7 more authors.
Poultry Science | Year: 2013

This study investigated variations in eggshell temperature (Tegg) during the hatching process of broiler eggs. Temperature sensors monitored embryo temperature by registering Tegg every minute. Measurements carried out on a sample of 40 focal eggs revealed temperature drops between 2 to 6°C during the last 3 d of incubation. Video cameras recorded the hatching process and served as the gold standard reference for manually labeling the hatch times of chicks. Comparison between Tegg drops and the hatch time of individuals revealed a time synchronization with 99% correlation coefficient and an absolute average time difference up to 25 min. Our findings suggest that attaching temperature sensors to eggshells is a precise tool for monitoring the hatch time of individual chicks. Individual hatch monitoring registers the biological age of chicks and facilitates an accurate and reliable means to count hatching results and manage the hatch window. © 2013 Poultry Science Association Inc.


Tong Q.,Royal Veterinary College | McGonnell I.M.,Royal Veterinary College | Romanini C.E.B.,Catholic University of Leuven | Bergoug H.,Anses Unit of Epidemiology and Welfare in Poultry and Rabbit Farming | And 8 more authors.
British Poultry Science | Year: 2015

Abstract: 1. Previous research has reported that chicken embryos develop a functionary auditory system during incubation and that prenatal sound may play an important role in embryo development and alter the hatch time. In this study the effects of prenatal auditory stimulation on hatch process, hatch performance, the development of embryo and blood parameters were investigated. 2. Four batches of Ross 308 broiler breeder eggs were incubated either in control or in sound-stimulated groups. The sound-stimulated embryos were exposed to a discontinuous sound of species-specific calls by means of a speaker at 72 dB for 16 h a day: maternal calls from d 10 to d 19 of incubation time and embryo/chick calls from d 19 until hatching. The species-specific sound was excluded from the control group. 3. The onset of hatch was delayed in the sound-stimulated group compared to the controls. This was also supported by comparison of the exact hatching time of individual focal chicks within the two groups. However, the sound-stimulated embryos had a lower hatchability than the control group, mainly due to significantly increased numbers of late deaths. 4. The embryos exhibited a similar growth pattern between the sound-stimulated group and the control group. Although sound exposure decreased body weight at d 16, no consistent effect of sound on body weight at incubation stage was observed. Species-specific sound stimulation also had no impact on chick quality, blood values and plasma corticosterone concentrations during hatch. © 2015, © 2015 British Poultry Science Ltd.


Tong Q.,Lane College | Demmers T.,Lane College | Romanini C.E.B.,Catholic University of Leuven | Bergoug H.,British Petroleum | And 8 more authors.
Animal | Year: 2015

Newly hatched chicks may be held longer than 48 h and experience long periods of fasting in commercial hatcheries. Limited information is known about the physiological status of chicks in such situations, due to the difficulty of precisely recording time of hatch. This study investigated the effect of the time from hatch to pulling (holding period) on physiological measures/parameters in 109 broiler chicks. Fertile Ross 308 eggs were incubated in a custom built small-scale incubator. The individual hatching time of each focal chick was determined using eggshell temperature monitoring. At 'pulling' (512 h of incubation time), the quality of focal chicks was assessed using the chick scoring method and physiological parameters were measured including BW, organ (heart, liver and stomach) weights, blood values and plasma corticosterone level. The time from hatch to pulling varied from 7.58 to 44.97 h. Egg weight at setting was significantly correlated with chick BW and weight of organs at pulling, but had no effect on chick quality, blood values and plasma corticosterone. Relative BW at pulling was negatively associated with the duration of holding period (P=0.002). However, there was a positive correlation between relative stomach weight and the duration of the holding period (P<0.001). As the holding period duration increased, there was a trend that blood partial pressure of oxygen, haematocrit and haemoglobin also increased, and blood partial pressure of carbon dioxide, total carbon dioxide and bicarbonate decreased (P<0.05). A wide range of plasma corticosterone was observed from chicks that had experienced different durations of holding period. We conclude that shortening the hatch window and minimising the number of chicks that experience a long holding period before pulling may improve chick quality and physiological status, which may be due to unfavourable environmental conditions that include feed and water deprivation. © The Animal Consortium 2015.


Bergoug H.,Anses Unit of Epidemiology and Welfare in Poultry and Rabbit farming | Burel C.,Anses Unit of Epidemiology and Welfare in Poultry and Rabbit farming | Guinebretiere M.,Anses Unit of Epidemiology and Welfare in Poultry and Rabbit farming | Tong Q.,Lane College | And 9 more authors.
World's Poultry Science Journal | Year: 2013

The zootechnical performances of broilers at the end of the rearing period depend in part on the quality of day-old chicks at placement. The quality of day-old chicks is highly affected by the incubation conditions, by hatch time (which determines the time spent in the hatcher under high temperature and humidity), and by the handling of chicks after hatch. This article first presents an overview of the most relevant pre-incubation factors that affect chick quality: egg size, egg weight, quality of eggs, sex of embryos, age of breeders, and conditions and duration of egg storage. It then reviews the most important incubation factors that affect hatch time, hatchability and hatch window (temperature, humidity, turning, ventilation and concentration of gases). Finally, the effect of early post-hatch handling (including processing and especially transportation of chicks) as a possible source of stress influencing the quality of chicks at placement is discussed. © World's Poultry Science Association 2013.


PubMed | Lane College, Catholic University of Leuven, Petersime N.V. and British Petroleum
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Animal : an international journal of animal bioscience | Year: 2015

Newly hatched chicks may be held longer than 48 h and experience long periods of fasting in commercial hatcheries. Limited information is known about the physiological status of chicks in such situations, due to the difficulty of precisely recording time of hatch. This study investigated the effect of the time from hatch to pulling (holding period) on physiological measures/parameters in 109 broiler chicks. Fertile Ross 308 eggs were incubated in a custom built small-scale incubator. The individual hatching time of each focal chick was determined using eggshell temperature monitoring. At pulling (512 h of incubation time), the quality of focal chicks was assessed using the chick scoring method and physiological parameters were measured including BW, organ (heart, liver and stomach) weights, blood values and plasma corticosterone level. The time from hatch to pulling varied from 7.58 to 44.97 h. Egg weight at setting was significantly correlated with chick BW and weight of organs at pulling, but had no effect on chick quality, blood values and plasma corticosterone. Relative BW at pulling was negatively associated with the duration of holding period (P=0.002). However, there was a positive correlation between relative stomach weight and the duration of the holding period (P<0.001). As the holding period duration increased, there was a trend that blood partial pressure of oxygen, haematocrit and haemoglobin also increased, and blood partial pressure of carbon dioxide, total carbon dioxide and bicarbonate decreased (P<0.05). A wide range of plasma corticosterone was observed from chicks that had experienced different durations of holding period. We conclude that shortening the hatch window and minimising the number of chicks that experience a long holding period before pulling may improve chick quality and physiological status, which may be due to unfavourable environmental conditions that include feed and water deprivation.

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