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Södertälje, Sweden

Karlsson H.,Linkoping University | Fredriksson I.,Linkoping University | Fredriksson I.,Perimed AB | Larsson M.,Linkoping University | Stromberg T.,Linkoping University
Optics Express | Year: 2012

A spectroscopic probe with multiple detecting fibers was used for quantifying absorption and scattering in liquid optical phantoms. The phantoms were mixtures of Intralipid and red and blue food dyes. Intensity calibration for the detecting fibers was undertaken using either a microsphere suspension (absolute calibration) or a uniform detector illumination (relative calibration between detectors). Two different scattering phase functions were used in an inverse Monte Carlo algorithm. Data were evaluated for residual spectra (systematic deviations and magnitude) and accuracy in estimation of scattering and absorption. Spectral fitting was improved by allowing for a 10% intensity relaxation in the optimization algorithm. For a multi-detector setup, non-systematic residual spectrum was only found using the more complex Gegenbauer-kernel phase function. However, the choice of phase function did not influence the accuracy in the estimation of absorption and scattering. Similar estimation accuracy as in the multi-detector setup was also obtained using either two relative calibrated detectors or one absolute calibrated detector at a fiber separation of 0.46 mm. © 2012 Optical Society of America. Source


Karlsson H.,Linkoping University | Pettersson A.,Perimed AB | Larsson M.,Linkoping University | Stromberg T.,Linkoping University
Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE | Year: 2011

Model based analysis of calibrated diffuse reflectance spectroscopy can be used for determining oxygenation and concentration of skin chromophores. This study aimed at assessing the effect of including melanin in addition to hemoglobin (Hb) as chromophores and compensating for inhomogeneously distributed blood (vessel packaging), in a single-layer skin model. Spectra from four humans were collected during different provocations using a twochannel fiber optic probe with source-detector separations 0.4 and 1.2 mm. Absolute calibrated spectra using data from either a single distance or both distances were analyzed using inverse Monte Carlo for light transport and Levenberg-Marquardt for non-linear fitting. The model fitting was excellent using a single distance. However, the estimated model failed to explain spectra from the other distance. The two-distance model did not fit the data well at either distance. Model fitting was significantly improved including melanin and vessel packaging. The most prominent effect when fitting data from the larger separation compared to the smaller separation was a different light scattering decay with wavelength, while the tissue fraction of Hb and saturation were similar. For modeling spectra at both distances, we propose using either a multi-layer skin model or a more advanced model for the scattering phase function. © 2011 SPIE. Source


Jonasson H.,Linkoping University | Fredriksson I.,Linkoping University | Fredriksson I.,Perimed AB | Larsson M.,Linkoping University | Stromberg T.,Linkoping University
IFMBE Proceedings | Year: 2015

By using a combined inverse model for diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and laser Doppler flow-metry (LDF) the tissue fraction of red blood cells (RBCs), their oxygenation and speed-resolved perfusion are estimated in absolute units. DRS spectra (450 to 850 nm) are measured at two source-detector distances; 0.4 and 1.2 mm. LDF spectra are measured at 1.2 mm, integrated in the same fiber-optic probe. Inverse Monte Carlo technique and an adaptive tissue model is used to quantify the microcirculatory parameters. Measurements were done during venous occlusion of the tissue. The model fitting yields a good spectral fit for the two DRS spectra and the LDF spectrum. The physiological responses regarding for example which speed regions respond to provocations follows a priori expectations. The combined model gives quantitative measures of RBC tissue fraction, oxygenation and speed resolved perfusion from the same sampling volume which gives new opportunities to interpret data. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015. Source


Stromberg T.,Linkoping University | Karlsson H.,Linkoping University | Fredriksson I.,Linkoping University | Fredriksson I.,Perimed AB | Larsson M.,Linkoping University
Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE | Year: 2013

We have previously presented an inverse Monte Carlo algorithm based on a three-layer semi-infinite skin model for analyzing diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) data. The algorithm includes pre-simulated Monte Carlo data for a range of physiologically relevant epidermal thicknesses and tissue scattering levels. The simulated photon pathlength distributions in each layer are stored and the absorption effect from tissue chromophores added in the post-processing. Recorded DRS spectra at source-detector distances of 0.4 and 1.2 mm were calibrated for the relative intensity between the two distances and matched to simulated spectra in a non-linear optimization algorithm. This study evaluates the DRS spectral fitting accuracy and presents data on the main output parameters; the tissue fraction of red blood cells and local oxygenation (SO2). As a reference, the microcirculatory perfusion (Perf) was measured simultaneously in the same probe using laser Doppler Flowmetry. Data were recorded on the volar forearm of three healthy subjects in a protocol involving a 5 min systolic occlusion. The DRS spectra were modeled with an rms-error < 2%. In two subjects, SO2 decreased during occlusion to <10%, and increased to above baseline after hyperemia, while Perf increased >7 times compared to baseline. In the third subject the SO2 decreased less during occlusion and increased to baseline values at hyperemia with only a 2-fold increase in Perf. The observed difference could be due to different microvascular beds being probed. It is concluded that integrating DRS and LDF enables new possibilities to deduce microcirculation status. © 2013 Copyright SPIE. Source


Fredriksson I.,Linkoping University | Fredriksson I.,Perimed AB | Burdakov O.,Linkoping University | Larsson M.,Linkoping University | Stromberg T.,Linkoping University
Journal of Biomedical Optics | Year: 2013

The tissue fraction of red blood cells (RBCs) and their oxygenation and speed-resolved perfusion are estimated in absolute units by combining diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). The DRS spectra (450 to 850 nm) are assessed at two source-detector separations (0.4 and 1.2 mm), allowing for a relative calibration routine, whereas LDF spectra are assessed at 1.2mmin the same fiber-optic probe. Data are analyzed using nonlinear optimization in an inverse Monte Carlo technique by applying an adaptive multilayered tissue model based on geometrical, scattering, and absorbing properties, as well as RBC flow-speed information. Simulations of 250 tissue-like models including up to 2000 individual blood vessels were used to evaluate the method. The absolute root mean square (RMS) deviation between estimated and true oxygenation was 4.1 percentage units, whereas the relative RMS deviations for the RBC tissue fraction and perfusion were 19% and 23%, respectively. Examples of in vivo measurements on forearm and foot during common provocations are presented. The method offers several advantages such as simultaneous quantification of RBC tissue fraction and oxygenation and perfusion from the same, predictable, sampling volume. The perfusion estimate is speed resolved, absolute (% RBC × mm/s), and more accurate due to the combination with DRS. © 2013 The Authors. Source

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