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News Article | May 19, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

After more than 25 years as the established leader in Northeast Los Angeles real estate, the Tracy King team, in association with Teles Properties, has announced the hiring of another top producing agent to their sales team, Buyer Specialist Chris Vargas. Headed by perennial top sales producer Tracy King, “Team Tracy” specializes in sales of Eagle Rock real estate as well as homes in Glassell Park, Highland Park, and Mt. Washington. Chris, a life-long resident of Eagle Rock, earned his real estate license in 2014 after working for years in public relations and marketing, where he developed social media and publicity strategies for premium brands such as Pepsi Cola and Nike. He began his real estate training at the La Canada office of The Partners Trust prior to joining Tracy King. “It’s an honor to have joined a firm with a strong reputation for quality,” said Vargas. “The Tracy King team is known throughout the industry for integrity, service, expertise and tenacity in sales. They’re hip, fun and friendly, but when advocating for their clients to get the best possible deal, they mean business. That’s the sort of close and personal service I want to be a part of and promote.” According to Senior Partner Keely Myres, Vargas comes to King’s award-winning team uniquely suited to make a substantial impact on the already successful real estate office. “Chris knows and understands the communities we represent,” stated Myres. “He brings a wealth of knowledge and experience in the area of online marketing and is a very personable, energetic agent who enjoys working with and helping people. He comes tailor-made for our boutique approach to servicing buyers and sellers of real estate in Northeast LA.” Team Tracy has been successfully representing homebuyers and sellers for more than a quarter century. Their area of expertise includes the sale of character and midcentury homes in the communities of Northeast Los Angeles. “Home sellers and homebuyers benefit from our expertise in online marketing, website building, search engines and online tools,” said Keely. “We were quick to embrace the technology. Our homes never languish long in the listings. They routinely sell quickly and almost always over asking price.” The addition of Vargas, who will also manage the firm’s commercial real estate department, will assure that the boutique firm will continue to meet the challenges of today’s complex and ever-changing real estate market. Northeast Los Angeles real estate is a hot and active market typified by the purchase and sales of character homes that include Victorians, Craftsman and Spanish bungalows, mission revival and mid-century styles. “The homes and neighborhoods we work in are very special. No two homes are alike and nothing is formulaic. Only passion and enthusiasm drives an agent to be successful in this market and Chris has that passion,” stated Keely. Tracy King recently completed her 27th successful year as a real estate professional specializing in buying and selling homes with a depth of experience that makes her the only choice for both the first time home buyer and the seasoned real estate investor.


Wang T.,Ohio State University | Tan S.Y.,Pepsi Cola Company | Mutilangi W.,Pepsi Cola Company | Aykas D.P.,Ohio State University | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Food Science | Year: 2015

The objective of this study was to develop a simple and rapid method to differentiate whey protein types (WPC, WPI, and WPH) used for beverage manufacturing by combining the spectral signature collected from portable mid-infrared spectrometers and pattern recognition analysis. Whey protein powders from different suppliers are produced using a large number of processing and compositional variables, resulting in variation in composition, concentration, protein structure, and thus functionality. Whey protein powders including whey protein isolates, whey protein concentrates and whey protein hydrolysates were obtained from different suppliers and their spectra collected using portable mid-infrared spectrometers (single and triple reflection) by pressing the powder onto an Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR) diamond crystal with a pressure clamp. Spectra were analyzed by soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) generating a classification model showing the ability to differentiate whey protein types by forming tight clusters with interclass distance values of >3, considered to be significantly different from each other. The major bands centered at 1640 and 1580 cm-1 were responsible for separation and were associated with differences in amide I and amide II vibrations of proteins, respectively. Another important band in whey protein clustering was associated with carboxylate vibrations of acidic amino acids (~1570 cm-1). The use of a portable mid-IR spectrometer combined with pattern recognition analysis showed potential for discriminating whey protein ingredients that can help to streamline the analytical procedure so that it is more applicable for field-based screening of ingredients. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®.


Newsome A.G.,Illinois College | Culver C.A.,Pepsi Cola Company | Van Breemen R.B.,Illinois College
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry | Year: 2014

The food and beverage industry is seeking to broaden the palette of naturally derived colorants. Although considerable effort has been devoted to the search for new blue colorants in fruits and vegetables, less attention has been directed toward blue compounds from other sources such as bacteria and fungi. The current work reviews known organic blue compounds from natural plant, animal, fungal, and microbial sources. The scarcity of blue-colored metabolites in the natural world relative to metabolites of other colors is discussed, and structural trends common among natural blue compounds are identified. These compounds are grouped into seven structural classes and evaluated for their potential as new color additives. © 2014 American Chemical Society.


Wrolstad R.E.,Oregon State University | Culver C.A.,Pepsi Cola Company
Annual Review of Food Science and Technology | Year: 2012

Replacement of artificial food dyes with natural colorants is a current marketing trend, notwithstanding the fact that neither the United States nor the European Union (EU) has defined natural with respect to food colors. Consumer groups have concerns over the safety of synthetic colorants, and in addition, many of the naturally derived colorants provide health benefits. Food scientists frequently have the assignment of replacing artificial colorants with natural alternatives. This can be challenging, as naturally derived colorants are usually less stable, and all desired hues might, in fact, not be obtainable. In this review, the chemical and physical properties, limitations, and more suitable applications for those colorants that are legally available as substitutes for the synthetic colorants are summarized. Issues and challenges for certain foods are discussed, and in addition, colorants that may be available in the future are briefly described. Copyright © 2012 by Annual Reviews.


Gulseren T.,University of Guelph | Fang Y.,Pepsi Cola Company | Corredig M.,University of Guelph
Food Hydrocolloids | Year: 2012

Whey protein isolate (WPI) nanoparticles were prepared by diluting an alkaline solution of protein in ethanol at concentrations varying between 50 and 80%. The nanoparticles were then immediately diluted in buffer. While the nanoparticles were not stable at pH 7, they showed no changes in size when diluted at pH 3. When 75-80% ethanol was added during preparation, the size of the WPI nanoparticles ranged between 10 and 100 nm, with no change in size after dilution and storage at pH 3 for 96 h at 22 °C. When heating was applied, particle aggregation occurred, and large aggregates (>1 μm) were observed at temperatures > 60 °C. The particle size of the heat-induced aggregates could be reduced by homogenization. The nanoparticles prepared by desolvation showed interfacial pressure values similar to those of the corresponding protein solutions, indicating similar interfacial properties and the potential to be used to stabilize emulsions but as supramolecular aggregates of WPI. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Gulseren I.,University of Guelph | Fang Y.,Pepsi Cola Company | Corredig M.,University of Guelph
Food and Function | Year: 2012

Using a desolvation method, whey protein isolate (WPI) nanoparticles were prepared and mixed with high methoxyl pectin (HMP) solutions (DE 72.8) to form WPI-HMP supramolecular complexes at low pH. Aqueous dispersions containing 5% WPI at pH 9 were desolvated with ethanol, and then diluted in HMP solutions at pH 3. Changes in particle size of the HMP-WPI complexes were studied as a function of HMP concentration. Upon dilution of the WPI nanoparticles in 0.05% HMP at pH 3, the average apparent diameter (d90) was around 270 nm, and there were no differences with desolvation level. These nanoparticles would undergo coarsening with storage at room temperature. The complexes showed to withstand homogenization and although heating increased aggregation, the particle size of the heated suspensions improved after homogenization. In addition, the suspensions demonstrated higher interfacial pressures (measured by drop tensiometry) compared to the corresponding unprocessed, desolvated or heated WPI solutions, suggesting their employment as surface active ingredients. The encapsulation efficiency of the desolvated WPI suspensions and desolvated WPI-HMP complex suspensions was studied using a model hydrophilic dye. In all cases, appreciable amounts of dye molecule were encapsulated and retained by the nanoparticles during storage at pH 3. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012.


Gulseren I.,University of Guelph | Fang Y.,Pepsi Cola Company | Corredig M.,University of Guelph
Food Chemistry | Year: 2012

Whey protein isolate (WPI) nanoparticles were prepared using ethanol desolvation, and their capacity to incorporate ZnCl2 was analysed. Desolvation was carried out at pH 9 and the volume of added ethanol was 0-3 times the volume of protein solution. The desolvated solutions were dispersed in acidified water (pH 3) immediately after desolvation. The size of the WPI nanoparticles increased with the volume ratio of ethanol:water used, as well as with the amount of ZnCl2. The nanoparticles showed high incorporation efficiencies, and remained stable after 30 days of storage at 22°C. The amount of zinc incorporated in the WPI particle suspensions was within the range of daily zinc requirements for healthy adults. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Pepsi Cola Company and Ohio State University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of food science | Year: 2015

The objective of this study was to develop a simple and rapid method to differentiate whey protein types (WPC, WPI, and WPH) used for beverage manufacturing by combining the spectral signature collected from portable mid-infrared spectrometers and pattern recognition analysis. Whey protein powders from different suppliers are produced using a large number of processing and compositional variables, resulting in variation in composition, concentration, protein structure, and thus functionality. Whey protein powders including whey protein isolates, whey protein concentrates and whey protein hydrolysates were obtained from different suppliers and their spectra collected using portable mid-infrared spectrometers (single and triple reflection) by pressing the powder onto an Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR) diamond crystal with a pressure clamp. Spectra were analyzed by soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) generating a classification model showing the ability to differentiate whey protein types by forming tight clusters with interclass distance values of >3, considered to be significantly different from each other. The major bands centered at 1640 and 1580 cm(-1) were responsible for separation and were associated with differences in amide I and amide II vibrations of proteins, respectively. Another important band in whey protein clustering was associated with carboxylate vibrations of acidic amino acids (1570 cm(-1)). The use of a portable mid-IR spectrometer combined with pattern recognition analysis showed potential for discriminating whey protein ingredients that can help to streamline the analytical procedure so that it is more applicable for field-based screening of ingredients.A rapid, simple and accurate method was developed to authenticate commercial whey protein products by using portable mid-infrared spectrometers combined with chemometrics, which could help ensure the functionality of whey protein ingredients in food applications.


PubMed | Pepsi Cola Company and Ohio State University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of dairy science | Year: 2016

Formulating whey protein beverages at acidic pH provides better clarity but the beverages typically develop an unpleasant and astringent flavor. Our aim was to evaluate the application of infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics in predicting astringency of acidic whey protein beverages. Whey protein isolate (WPI), whey protein concentrate (WPC), and whey protein hydrolysate (WPH) from different manufacturers were used to formulate beverages at pH ranging from 2.2 to 3.9. Trained panelists using the spectrum method of descriptive analysis tested the beverages providing astringency scores. A portable Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy attenuated total reflectance spectrometer was used for spectra collection that was analyzed by multivariate regression analysis (partial least squares regression) to build calibration models with the sensory astringency scores. Beverage astringency scores fluctuated from 1.9 to 5.2 units and were explained by pH, protein type (WPC, WPI, or WPH), source (manufacturer), and their interactions, revealing the complexity of astringency development in acidic whey protein beverages. The WPC and WPH beverages showed an increase in astringency as the pH of the solution was lowered, but no relationship was found for WPI beverages. The partial least squares regression analysis showed strong relationship between the reference astringency scores and the infrared predicted values (correlation coefficient >0.94), giving standard error of cross-validation ranging from 0.08 to 0.12 units, depending on whey protein type. Major absorption bands explaining astringency scores were associated with carboxylic groups and amide regions of proteins. The portable infrared technique allowed rapid prediction of astringency of acidic whey protein beverages, providing the industry a novel tool for monitoring sensory characteristics of whey-containing beverages.

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