State College, PA, United States

Penn State College of Medicine

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State College, PA, United States

Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, located in Hershey, Pennsylvania, 10 miles east of Harrisburg, is Penn State’s medical school and academic medical center. Wikipedia.

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NEW YORK, May 25, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The American Health Council has chosen Faoud T. Ishmael, Allergist-Immunologist at Penn State College of Medicine, as one of the "Best Doctor's in America" for 2017. Recognized for his knowledge and expertise in MicroRNAs, Severe Asthma, Allergic Diseases, Drug Allergies, Immunodeficiencies, and Internal Medicine, Dr. Ishmael has been awarded the "Leaders in Medicine" award among Pennsylvania doctors. Selection for the American Health Council’s “Leaders in Medicine” award is reserved for those individuals who have exhibited exemplary conduct in their field. These doctors and medical educators serve as the guiding light for advancement from the classroom to the consultation room to the operating room. Only those who master the key roles that drive patient care — advocate, collaborator, communicator, decision maker, expert, manager, scholar — are deserving to be named the “Best Doctors in America.” With over a decade of experience in the field of Internal Medicine, Dr. Ishmael offers valuable insight in his multiple roles as a Physician, Associate Professor, Allergist-Immunologist, and Director of Basic Science Research at Penn State College of Medicine. Located in Hershey, Pennsylvania, Penn State College of Medicine incorporates the core values of respect, integrity, excellence, and teamwork to prepare healthcare professionals to improve the health of the community and beyond. In his many roles at Penn State College of Medicine since 2010, Dr. Ishmael’s day-to-day responsibilities include clinical research, teaching and mentoring. He is proud to have mentored five graduate students, ten clinical post-doctoral fellows, and ten undergraduate students in his lab. In addition, Dr. Ishmael has served as a senior advisor for three assistant professors and as a mentor in the Penn State College of Medicine Junior Faculty Development Program. Following graduation with his MD/PhD from Penn State College of Medicine in 2004, Dr. Ishmael completed his residency in Internal Medicine at Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in 2006.  In 2009, Dr. Ishmael completed a fellowship in Allergy/Immunology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. As a testament to his success, Dr. Ishmael has been a recipient of the following honors: 2011 Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Clinical Scientist Development Award, 2012 Penn State Department of Medicine Research Excellence Award, 2013 NIH K08 Career Development Award, 2015/2016 Peak Provider Clinical Award, 2015/2016 Castle Connelly Top Doctor, April 2016 Press Mention in the United Press International, and April 2016 Press Mention in Science Daily. Dr. Ishmael’s desire to pursue Internal Medicine developed when he discovered the excitement of research during his undergraduate studies. He attributes his success to hard work, dedication, excellent mentors, great resources, and support from his loving family. Dr. Ishmael serves as the Associate Editor for Translational Genetics and Genomics, Associate Editor for American Journal of Clinical and Experimental Immunology, Research Editor for Open Access Inflammation, and the Journal Reviewer for the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Journal of Immunology, and the Journal of Biological Chemistry. Among his many accomplishments, Dr. Ishmael is proud his research contributions have changed the management of asthma and he has established research collaborations with labs at Johns Hopkins University, Cornell University, and the University of Pennsylvania. Additionally, he is proud to have more than forty-five peer-reviewed articles, and over forty-five abstracts and national presentations. Dr. Ishmael maintains affiliations with the American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI) and the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (ACAAI). He volunteers with the Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology and is a member of the Adverse Reactions to Drugs, Biologics, and Latex committee. Dr. Ishmael has served as vice representative for the seminar committee for the Asthma Diagnosis and Therapy interest section. In his free time, he enjoys partaking in art, archery, working outdoors and spending time with his three children. Looking ahead, Dr. Ishmael hopes to develop a diagnostic blood test for asthma to personalize asthma management and discover the molecular mechanisms that cause severe asthma and other inflammatory diseases. The American Health Council is the nation’s only organization with a constituency representative of all sectors of the healthcare industry. From the coasts to the heartland, the American Health Council has drawn Affiliates from major metropolitan hubs and small communities. These Affiliates span generations and have reached different stages of their careers — from recent graduates to retirees. More information about the American Health Council and its mission can be found at: http://americanhealthcouncil.org Additionally, the American Health Council strives to provide recognition and support for those individuals and institutions making the difference in patients’ lives day in and day out. Throughout 2017, the AHC is honoring “America’s Best Doctors and Nurses,” as well as the nation’s best medical universities and hospitals. The American Health Council’s “Best in Medicine” and “Best in Nursing” awards programs honor the individuals and institutions that have contributed significantly to medicine and nursing, as well as the training and education of physicians and nurses. The most current selections for these honors may be viewed here: http://bestinmedicine.org and http://bestinnursing.org.


A University of Oklahoma Civil Engineering and Environmental Science Professor Robert Nairn and his co-authors have conducted a collaborative study that suggests exposure to trace metals from potatoes grown in soil irrigated with waters from the Potosi mining region in Bolivia, home to the world's largest silver deposit, may put residents at risk of non-cancer health illnesses. "In this high mountain desert, water is a critically precious resource and the use of metal-polluted waters for irrigation may have substantial detrimental impacts on the lives of subsistence farmers," said Bill Strosnider, researcher on the project. Potatoes are the primary dietary staple in the surrounding communities. The lack of water for quality irrigation throughout this arid region results in farmers using contaminated waters, leading to health risks from contaminated potatoes eaten locally or shipped to outlying areas. For children, ingestion of arsenic through potatoes was 9.1 to 71.8 times higher than the minimum risk level and ingestion of cadmium was 3.0 to 31.5 times higher than the minimum risk level. "The fact that the hazard quotients of risk were so high through only one exposure route is concerning," said Robin Taylor Wilson, Penn State College of Medicine professor and lead epidemiologist for the study. "Children in this region are exposed to contaminants through routes other than potatoes. If we consider these additional routes of exposure, the estimated risks will likely be much higher, but without further research, there is no way of knowing how much higher these risks might be." The hazard quotient is the ratio of estimated specific exposure to a single chemical over a specified period to the estimated daily exposure level at which no adverse health effects are likely to occur. Hazard quotients about one suggest the possibility of adverse non-cancer health risks. The minimum risk levels are established by the U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. "Our findings allow the research community insight into the potential human and environmental impact that vast active and abandoned mining operations may pose all across the Andean region," said Alan Garrido, researcher on the project.


DALLAS, May 24, 2017 -- People with a common cluster of risk factors for heart disease and diabetes were approximately twice as likely to die of heart disease or stroke as people without the same set of risk factors if they failed to get more than six hours of sleep, according to a new observational study published in the association's open access publication Journal of the American Heart Association. For those who got more sleep, the risk of death was more modest. The study, funded in part by the American Heart Association, is the first to measure sleep duration in the laboratory rather than rely on patient reports and the first to examine the impact of sleep duration on the risk of death in those with a common cluster of heart disease risk factors. The researchers randomly selected 1,344 adults (average age 49 years, 42 percent male) who agreed to spend one night in a sleep laboratory as part of the Penn State Adult Cohort. Based on their test results, 39.2 percent of the participants were found to have at least three of the risk factors, that when clustered together are known as the metabolic syndrome. For this study, the cluster included body mass index (BMI) higher than 30 and elevated total cholesterol, blood pressure, fasting blood sugar and triglyceride levels. During an average follow-up of 16.6 years, 22 percent of the participants died. Compared to people without the same cluster of risk factors, those with metabolic syndrome who clocked more than six hours of sleep time in the lab were about 1.49 times more likely to die of stroke during the 16.6-year follow-up period, while those who slept less than six hours in the lab were about 2.1 times more likely to die of heart disease or stroke. The short sleepers with metabolic syndrome were also 1.99 times more likely to die from any cause compared to those without metabolic syndrome. The relationship was particularly striking because the researchers adjusted for sleep apnea - sleep interrupted by pauses in breathing that is a known heart disease risk. "If you have several heart disease risk factors, taking care of your sleep and consulting with a clinician if you have insufficient sleep is important if you want to lower your risk of death from heart disease or stroke," said study lead author Julio Fernandez-Mendoza, Ph.D., an assistant professor at Penn State College of Medicine and sleep psychologist at the Sleep Research & Treatment Center of the Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, Pennsylvania. He noted that sleep lab studies are often used to rule out sleep apnea, but physicians should also note insufficient sleep in the lab because it may signal a higher risk of death in patients with risk factors for heart disease. A recent scientific statement from the American Heart Association on sleep duration and quality noted that an increasing number of Americans suffer from sleep difficulties or choose to curtail sleep in favor of other social, leisure, or work-related activities and this may be associated with adverse cardiovascular risks and outcomes. As the Fernandez-Mendoza research was an observational study, the results cannot establish a cause-and-effect, only an association between short sleep and mortality in people with the metabolic syndrome. Additional limitations include that the study used only one day of sleep lab results and enrolled too few minority patients to determine whether there are racial differences in the relationship between short sleep times and mortality. "Future clinical trials are needed to determine whether lengthening sleep, in combination with lowering blood pressure and glucose, improves the prognosis of people with the metabolic syndrome" said Fernandez-Mendoza. Co-authors are Fan He, M.S.; Caitlin LaGrotte, Psy.D.; Alexandros N. Vgontzas, M.D.; Duanping Liao, M.D., Ph.D.; and Edward O. Bixler, Ph.D. Author disclosures are on the manuscript. The American Heart Association and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute funded the study. Statements and conclusions of study authors published in American Heart Association scientific journals are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect the association's policy or position. The association makes no representation or guarantee as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations and health insurance providers are available at http://www. . The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke - the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies, and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation's oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.


NEW YORK, May 25, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The American Health Council has chosen Faoud T. Ishmael, Allergist-Immunologist at Penn State College of Medicine, as one of the "Best Doctor's in America" for 2017. Recognized for his knowledge and expertise in MicroRNAs, Severe Asthma, Allergic Diseases, Drug Allergies, Immunodeficiencies, and Internal Medicine, Dr. Ishmael has been awarded the "Leaders in Medicine" award among Pennsylvania doctors. Selection for the American Health Council’s “Leaders in Medicine” award is reserved for those individuals who have exhibited exemplary conduct in their field. These doctors and medical educators serve as the guiding light for advancement from the classroom to the consultation room to the operating room. Only those who master the key roles that drive patient care — advocate, collaborator, communicator, decision maker, expert, manager, scholar — are deserving to be named the “Best Doctors in America.” With over a decade of experience in the field of Internal Medicine, Dr. Ishmael offers valuable insight in his multiple roles as a Physician, Associate Professor, Allergist-Immunologist, and Director of Basic Science Research at Penn State College of Medicine. Located in Hershey, Pennsylvania, Penn State College of Medicine incorporates the core values of respect, integrity, excellence, and teamwork to prepare healthcare professionals to improve the health of the community and beyond. In his many roles at Penn State College of Medicine since 2010, Dr. Ishmael’s day-to-day responsibilities include clinical research, teaching and mentoring. He is proud to have mentored five graduate students, ten clinical post-doctoral fellows, and ten undergraduate students in his lab. In addition, Dr. Ishmael has served as a senior advisor for three assistant professors and as a mentor in the Penn State College of Medicine Junior Faculty Development Program. Following graduation with his MD/PhD from Penn State College of Medicine in 2004, Dr. Ishmael completed his residency in Internal Medicine at Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in 2006.  In 2009, Dr. Ishmael completed a fellowship in Allergy/Immunology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. As a testament to his success, Dr. Ishmael has been a recipient of the following honors: 2011 Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Clinical Scientist Development Award, 2012 Penn State Department of Medicine Research Excellence Award, 2013 NIH K08 Career Development Award, 2015/2016 Peak Provider Clinical Award, 2015/2016 Castle Connelly Top Doctor, April 2016 Press Mention in the United Press International, and April 2016 Press Mention in Science Daily. Dr. Ishmael’s desire to pursue Internal Medicine developed when he discovered the excitement of research during his undergraduate studies. He attributes his success to hard work, dedication, excellent mentors, great resources, and support from his loving family. Dr. Ishmael serves as the Associate Editor for Translational Genetics and Genomics, Associate Editor for American Journal of Clinical and Experimental Immunology, Research Editor for Open Access Inflammation, and the Journal Reviewer for the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Journal of Immunology, and the Journal of Biological Chemistry. Among his many accomplishments, Dr. Ishmael is proud his research contributions have changed the management of asthma and he has established research collaborations with labs at Johns Hopkins University, Cornell University, and the University of Pennsylvania. Additionally, he is proud to have more than forty-five peer-reviewed articles, and over forty-five abstracts and national presentations. Dr. Ishmael maintains affiliations with the American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI) and the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (ACAAI). He volunteers with the Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology and is a member of the Adverse Reactions to Drugs, Biologics, and Latex committee. Dr. Ishmael has served as vice representative for the seminar committee for the Asthma Diagnosis and Therapy interest section. In his free time, he enjoys partaking in art, archery, working outdoors and spending time with his three children. Looking ahead, Dr. Ishmael hopes to develop a diagnostic blood test for asthma to personalize asthma management and discover the molecular mechanisms that cause severe asthma and other inflammatory diseases. The American Health Council is the nation’s only organization with a constituency representative of all sectors of the healthcare industry. From the coasts to the heartland, the American Health Council has drawn Affiliates from major metropolitan hubs and small communities. These Affiliates span generations and have reached different stages of their careers — from recent graduates to retirees. More information about the American Health Council and its mission can be found at: http://americanhealthcouncil.org Additionally, the American Health Council strives to provide recognition and support for those individuals and institutions making the difference in patients’ lives day in and day out. Throughout 2017, the AHC is honoring “America’s Best Doctors and Nurses,” as well as the nation’s best medical universities and hospitals. The American Health Council’s “Best in Medicine” and “Best in Nursing” awards programs honor the individuals and institutions that have contributed significantly to medicine and nursing, as well as the training and education of physicians and nurses. The most current selections for these honors may be viewed here: http://bestinmedicine.org and http://bestinnursing.org.


NEW YORK, May 25, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The American Health Council has chosen Faoud T. Ishmael, Allergist-Immunologist at Penn State College of Medicine, as one of the "Best Doctor's in America" for 2017. Recognized for his knowledge and expertise in MicroRNAs, Severe Asthma, Allergic Diseases, Drug Allergies, Immunodeficiencies, and Internal Medicine, Dr. Ishmael has been awarded the "Leaders in Medicine" award among Pennsylvania doctors. Selection for the American Health Council’s “Leaders in Medicine” award is reserved for those individuals who have exhibited exemplary conduct in their field. These doctors and medical educators serve as the guiding light for advancement from the classroom to the consultation room to the operating room. Only those who master the key roles that drive patient care — advocate, collaborator, communicator, decision maker, expert, manager, scholar — are deserving to be named the “Best Doctors in America.” With over a decade of experience in the field of Internal Medicine, Dr. Ishmael offers valuable insight in his multiple roles as a Physician, Associate Professor, Allergist-Immunologist, and Director of Basic Science Research at Penn State College of Medicine. Located in Hershey, Pennsylvania, Penn State College of Medicine incorporates the core values of respect, integrity, excellence, and teamwork to prepare healthcare professionals to improve the health of the community and beyond. In his many roles at Penn State College of Medicine since 2010, Dr. Ishmael’s day-to-day responsibilities include clinical research, teaching and mentoring. He is proud to have mentored five graduate students, ten clinical post-doctoral fellows, and ten undergraduate students in his lab. In addition, Dr. Ishmael has served as a senior advisor for three assistant professors and as a mentor in the Penn State College of Medicine Junior Faculty Development Program. Following graduation with his MD/PhD from Penn State College of Medicine in 2004, Dr. Ishmael completed his residency in Internal Medicine at Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in 2006.  In 2009, Dr. Ishmael completed a fellowship in Allergy/Immunology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. As a testament to his success, Dr. Ishmael has been a recipient of the following honors: 2011 Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Clinical Scientist Development Award, 2012 Penn State Department of Medicine Research Excellence Award, 2013 NIH K08 Career Development Award, 2015/2016 Peak Provider Clinical Award, 2015/2016 Castle Connelly Top Doctor, April 2016 Press Mention in the United Press International, and April 2016 Press Mention in Science Daily. Dr. Ishmael’s desire to pursue Internal Medicine developed when he discovered the excitement of research during his undergraduate studies. He attributes his success to hard work, dedication, excellent mentors, great resources, and support from his loving family. Dr. Ishmael serves as the Associate Editor for Translational Genetics and Genomics, Associate Editor for American Journal of Clinical and Experimental Immunology, Research Editor for Open Access Inflammation, and the Journal Reviewer for the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Journal of Immunology, and the Journal of Biological Chemistry. Among his many accomplishments, Dr. Ishmael is proud his research contributions have changed the management of asthma and he has established research collaborations with labs at Johns Hopkins University, Cornell University, and the University of Pennsylvania. Additionally, he is proud to have more than forty-five peer-reviewed articles, and over forty-five abstracts and national presentations. Dr. Ishmael maintains affiliations with the American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI) and the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (ACAAI). He volunteers with the Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology and is a member of the Adverse Reactions to Drugs, Biologics, and Latex committee. Dr. Ishmael has served as vice representative for the seminar committee for the Asthma Diagnosis and Therapy interest section. In his free time, he enjoys partaking in art, archery, working outdoors and spending time with his three children. Looking ahead, Dr. Ishmael hopes to develop a diagnostic blood test for asthma to personalize asthma management and discover the molecular mechanisms that cause severe asthma and other inflammatory diseases. The American Health Council is the nation’s only organization with a constituency representative of all sectors of the healthcare industry. From the coasts to the heartland, the American Health Council has drawn Affiliates from major metropolitan hubs and small communities. These Affiliates span generations and have reached different stages of their careers — from recent graduates to retirees. More information about the American Health Council and its mission can be found at: http://americanhealthcouncil.org Additionally, the American Health Council strives to provide recognition and support for those individuals and institutions making the difference in patients’ lives day in and day out. Throughout 2017, the AHC is honoring “America’s Best Doctors and Nurses,” as well as the nation’s best medical universities and hospitals. The American Health Council’s “Best in Medicine” and “Best in Nursing” awards programs honor the individuals and institutions that have contributed significantly to medicine and nursing, as well as the training and education of physicians and nurses. The most current selections for these honors may be viewed here: http://bestinmedicine.org and http://bestinnursing.org.


NEW YORK, May 25, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The American Health Council has chosen Faoud T. Ishmael, Allergist-Immunologist at Penn State College of Medicine, as one of the "Best Doctor's in America" for 2017. Recognized for his knowledge and expertise in MicroRNAs, Severe Asthma, Allergic Diseases, Drug Allergies, Immunodeficiencies, and Internal Medicine, Dr. Ishmael has been awarded the "Leaders in Medicine" award among Pennsylvania doctors. Selection for the American Health Council’s “Leaders in Medicine” award is reserved for those individuals who have exhibited exemplary conduct in their field. These doctors and medical educators serve as the guiding light for advancement from the classroom to the consultation room to the operating room. Only those who master the key roles that drive patient care — advocate, collaborator, communicator, decision maker, expert, manager, scholar — are deserving to be named the “Best Doctors in America.” With over a decade of experience in the field of Internal Medicine, Dr. Ishmael offers valuable insight in his multiple roles as a Physician, Associate Professor, Allergist-Immunologist, and Director of Basic Science Research at Penn State College of Medicine. Located in Hershey, Pennsylvania, Penn State College of Medicine incorporates the core values of respect, integrity, excellence, and teamwork to prepare healthcare professionals to improve the health of the community and beyond. In his many roles at Penn State College of Medicine since 2010, Dr. Ishmael’s day-to-day responsibilities include clinical research, teaching and mentoring. He is proud to have mentored five graduate students, ten clinical post-doctoral fellows, and ten undergraduate students in his lab. In addition, Dr. Ishmael has served as a senior advisor for three assistant professors and as a mentor in the Penn State College of Medicine Junior Faculty Development Program. Following graduation with his MD/PhD from Penn State College of Medicine in 2004, Dr. Ishmael completed his residency in Internal Medicine at Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in 2006.  In 2009, Dr. Ishmael completed a fellowship in Allergy/Immunology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. As a testament to his success, Dr. Ishmael has been a recipient of the following honors: 2011 Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Clinical Scientist Development Award, 2012 Penn State Department of Medicine Research Excellence Award, 2013 NIH K08 Career Development Award, 2015/2016 Peak Provider Clinical Award, 2015/2016 Castle Connelly Top Doctor, April 2016 Press Mention in the United Press International, and April 2016 Press Mention in Science Daily. Dr. Ishmael’s desire to pursue Internal Medicine developed when he discovered the excitement of research during his undergraduate studies. He attributes his success to hard work, dedication, excellent mentors, great resources, and support from his loving family. Dr. Ishmael serves as the Associate Editor for Translational Genetics and Genomics, Associate Editor for American Journal of Clinical and Experimental Immunology, Research Editor for Open Access Inflammation, and the Journal Reviewer for the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Journal of Immunology, and the Journal of Biological Chemistry. Among his many accomplishments, Dr. Ishmael is proud his research contributions have changed the management of asthma and he has established research collaborations with labs at Johns Hopkins University, Cornell University, and the University of Pennsylvania. Additionally, he is proud to have more than forty-five peer-reviewed articles, and over forty-five abstracts and national presentations. Dr. Ishmael maintains affiliations with the American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI) and the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (ACAAI). He volunteers with the Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology and is a member of the Adverse Reactions to Drugs, Biologics, and Latex committee. Dr. Ishmael has served as vice representative for the seminar committee for the Asthma Diagnosis and Therapy interest section. In his free time, he enjoys partaking in art, archery, working outdoors and spending time with his three children. Looking ahead, Dr. Ishmael hopes to develop a diagnostic blood test for asthma to personalize asthma management and discover the molecular mechanisms that cause severe asthma and other inflammatory diseases. The American Health Council is the nation’s only organization with a constituency representative of all sectors of the healthcare industry. From the coasts to the heartland, the American Health Council has drawn Affiliates from major metropolitan hubs and small communities. These Affiliates span generations and have reached different stages of their careers — from recent graduates to retirees. More information about the American Health Council and its mission can be found at: http://americanhealthcouncil.org Additionally, the American Health Council strives to provide recognition and support for those individuals and institutions making the difference in patients’ lives day in and day out. Throughout 2017, the AHC is honoring “America’s Best Doctors and Nurses,” as well as the nation’s best medical universities and hospitals. The American Health Council’s “Best in Medicine” and “Best in Nursing” awards programs honor the individuals and institutions that have contributed significantly to medicine and nursing, as well as the training and education of physicians and nurses. The most current selections for these honors may be viewed here: http://bestinmedicine.org and http://bestinnursing.org.

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