Peking Yale Joint Center for Plant Molecular Genetics and Agro Biotechnology

Port-of-Spain, Trinidad and Tobago

Peking Yale Joint Center for Plant Molecular Genetics and Agro Biotechnology

Port-of-Spain, Trinidad and Tobago
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Chen H.,Peking Yale Joint Center for Plant Molecular Genetics and Agro Biotechnology | Xie W.,Huazhong Agricultural University | He H.,Peking Yale Joint Center for Plant Molecular Genetics and Agro Biotechnology | Yu H.,China National Seed Group Co. | And 15 more authors.
Molecular Plant | Year: 2014

A high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array is critically important for geneticists and molecular breeders. With the accumulation of huge amounts of genomic re-sequencing data and available technologies for accurate SNP detection, it is possible to design high-density and high-quality rice SNP arrays. Here we report the development of a high-density rice SNP array and its utility. SNP probes were designed by screening more than 10 000 000 SNP loci extracted from the re-sequencing data of 801 rice varieties and an array named RiceSNP50 was produced on the Illumina Infinium platform. The array contained 51 478 evenly distributed markers, 68% of which were within genic regions. Several hundred rice plants with parent/F1 relationships were used to generate a high-quality cluster file for accurate SNP calling. Application tests showed that this array had high genotyping accuracy, and could be used for different objectives. For example, a core collection of elite rice varieties was clustered with fine resolution. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) analysis correctly identified a characterized QTL. Further, this array was successfully used for variety verification and trait introgression. As an accurate high-throughput genotyping tool, RiceSNP50 will play an important role in both functional genomics studies and molecular breeding. © The Author 2013.


Dong J.,Peking Yale Joint Center for Plant Molecular Genetics and Agro biotechnology | Terzaghi W.,Wilkes University | Deng X.W.,Peking Yale Joint Center for Plant Molecular Genetics and Agro biotechnology | Chen H.,Peking Yale Joint Center for Plant Molecular Genetics and Agro biotechnology
Plant Signaling and Behavior | Year: 2015

Light is both a source of energy and a critically important environmental signal for plant development. Through decades of research, 2 groups of photomorphogenic repressors have been identified. The first group is CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC/DE-ETIOLATED/FUSCA (COP/DET/FUS), which were first identified by genetic screening and then by purification of protein complexes. Another group is the Phytochrome-Interacting Factors (PIFs), which were identified by yeast 2-hybrid screens using phyB as bait. How so many factors work together to repress photomorphogenesis has long been an interesting question. Previously, we demonstrated that CULLIN4 (CUL4) works as a core factor connecting the COP1-SPA complexes, the COP9 signalosome (CSN), and the COP10-DDB1-DET1 (CDD) complex. Recently, we showed that DET1 represses photomorphogenesis through positively regulating the abundance of PIF proteins in the dark. Dr. Huq and his colleagues reported that PIFs may enhance the function of COP1-SPA complexes to promote the degradation of HY5, and thus they synergistically repress photomorphogenesis in the dark. Though much work still needs to be done, these recent breakthroughs shed light on the regulatory relationships among these multiple photomorphogenic repressors. © 2015 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.


Huang X.,Peking Yale Joint Center for Plant Molecular Genetics and Agro Biotechnology | Deng X.W.,Peking Yale Joint Center for Plant Molecular Genetics and Agro Biotechnology
Plant Signaling and Behavior | Year: 2013

Low-fluence and long-wavelength UV-B (UV-B) light promotes photomorphogenic development in Arabidopsis. CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1 (COP1) is a positive regulator in this pathway while it is a negative regulator of the traditional photomorphogenesis triggered by far-red and visible light. We have recently reported the mechanism by which the switch of COP1 function is accomplished in distinct light contexts. In response to photomorphogenic UV-B, the photoactivated UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8 (UVR8) associates with the COP1- SUPRESSOR OF PHYA (SPA) core complexes, resulting in the physical and functional disassociation of COP1-SPA from the CULLIN4-DAMAGED DNA BINDING PROTEIN 1 (CUL4-DDB1) E3 scaffold. These UV-B dependent UVR8-COP1-SPA complexes promote the stability and activity of ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5), and eventually cause COP1 to switch from repressing to promoting photomorphogenesis. In addition, it is possible that CUL4-DDB1 might simultaneously recruit alternative DDB1 BINDING WD40 (DWD) proteins to repress this UV-B-specific signaling. Further investigation is required, however, to verify this hypothesis. Overall, the coordinated organization of various protein complexes facilitates an efficient and balanced UV-B signaling. © 2013 Landes Bioscience.

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