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Gunby J.,Pegasus Technologies | Bissonnette F.,University of Montreal | Librach C.,University of Toronto | Cowan L.,Victoria Fertility Center
Fertility and Sterility | Year: 2011

Objective: To present a report on assisted reproductive technologies (ART) cycles performed in 2007 in Canada and show trends in outcomes over time. This is the seventh annual report from the Canadian ART Register (CARTR). Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: Twenty-six of 26 ART centers in Canada. Patient(s): Couples undergoing ART treatment in Canada during 2007. Intervention(s): ART treatments, including in vitro fertilization (IVF), intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), and frozen embryo transfer (FET). Main Outcome Measure(s): Clinical pregnancy, live-birth, and multiple-birth rates. Result(s): A total of 13,482 ART cycles was reported to CARTR. In 8,972 IVF/ICSI cycles using the woman's own oocytes, per cycle started, the clinical pregnancy rate was 35.6% (41.0% per ET), and the live-birth rate was 28.6%; the multiple-birth rate per delivery was 30.2%, with a high-order multiple-birth rate of 1.1%. In 68% of cycles ICSI was performed. One or two embryos were transferred in 69% of cycles. In 404 IVF/ICSI cycles using donor oocytes, the clinical pregnancy rate was 44.6%, and the live-birth rate was 36.1%; the multiple-birth rate was 26.5%, with no triplet birth. In 3,224 FET cycles using the woman's own oocytes, the clinical pregnancy rate was 23.7%, and the live-birth rate was 17.8%; the multiple-birth rate was 24.1%, with a triplet birth rate of 0.2%. Birth outcomes were unknown for 2.0% of ongoing pregnancies. Conclusion(s): For 2007, CARTR achieved 100% voluntary participation from Canadian ART centers for the fifth consecutive year. Clinical pregnancy and live-birth rates continued to increase in 2007 compared with previous years, with a decrease in high-order multiple births. © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine, Published by Elsevier Inc. Source


Gunby J.,Pegasus Technologies | Bissonnette F.,University of Montreal | Librach C.,Sunnybrook Health science Center | Cowan L.,Victoria Fertility Center
Fertility and Sterility | Year: 2010

Objective: To present a report on assisted reproductive technologies (ART) cycles performed in 2006 in Canada and show trends in outcomes over time. This is the sixth annual report from the Canadian ART Register (CARTR). Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: Twenty-five of 25 ART centers in Canada. Patient(s): Couples undergoing ART treatment in Canada during 2006. Intervention(s): ART treatments, including in vitro fertilization (IVF), intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), and frozen embryo transfer (FET). Main Outcome Measure(s): Clinical pregnancy, live birth, and multiple birth rates. Result(s): A total of 12,052 ART cycles was reported to CARTR. In 8278 IVF/ICSI cycles using the woman's own oocytes, the clinical pregnancy rate per cycle started was 33.7% (38.6% per ET), and the live birth rate was 27.1%; the multiple birth rate per delivery was 30.3%, with a high-order multiple birth rate of 1.5%. In 64% of cycles, ICSI was performed. One or two embryos were transferred in 67% of cycles. In 350 IVF/ICSI cycles using donor oocytes, the clinical pregnancy rate was 42.3%, and the live birth rate was 33.6%; the multiple birth rate was 37.3%, with no triplet birth. In 2838 FET cycles using the woman's own oocytes, the clinical pregnancy rate was 24.3%, and the live birth rate was 18.6%; the multiple birth rate was 22.5%, with a triplet birth rate of 0.6%. Birth outcomes were unknown for 3.6% of ongoing pregnancies. Conclusion(s): For 2006, CARTR achieved 100% voluntary participation from Canadian ART centers for the fourth consecutive year. Clinical pregnancy and live birth rates continued to increase in 2006 compared with previous years, but multiple birth rates decreased only slightly. © 2010 by American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Source


Trademark
Pegasus Technologies | Date: 2005-07-26

Computer software, namely software for assisting operators of power generation utilities to improve and optimize heat rate performance and to reduce emissions such as nitrous oxides, sulfur dioxide, and carbon dioxide.


E3

Trademark
Pegasus Technologies | Date: 2005-07-29

computer software and software applications for assisting operators of power generation utilities to improve heat rate performance an to reduce emissions such as nitrous oxides, sulfur dioxide, and carbon dioxide.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 98.68K | Year: 2003

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project aims on creating a visualization technology for advanced analysis of large multivariate datasets. Such technology will be harnessed for finding hidden dependences in data, revealing its cluster structure, selection of features, and finding regions of extreme values of the functions defined on the data. Successful solutions of such problems require preserving the most important distances between data patterns in a lower dimension. Currently existing visualization methods only preserve distances for datasets of the size up to few thousands. Many applications in the process industries, bio-informatics, medicine, and defense include analysis of datasets containing large datasets with 10,000-1 million patterns. The hierarchical technique suggested in this project will expand the use of visualization for advanced data analysis to that range of datasets. The first applications are seen in process industries such as power generation. Broader use of this innovation is anticipated in medicine, bio-informatics, and defense for knowledge discovery through revealing the structure of data. This project will be used in education for teaching multivariate analysis. The Phase I activities are expected to create a foundation for further development in Phase II, leading to integration in a commercial software package. The first applications of this visualization technology will be for building models for use in coal-fired power plants advanc pollution control systems. The visualization tool will become part of a commercially available package and will be incorporated into a more comprehensive data analysis, modeling, optimization, and control systems. Medicine, bio-informatics, and defense are seen as additional potential beneficiaries of the visualization tool.

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