Pediatric Unit

Piove di Sacco, Italy

Pediatric Unit

Piove di Sacco, Italy

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News Article | February 25, 2017
Site: www.PR.com

Receive press releases from The Medical Center of Aurora: By Email The Medical Center of Aurora Opens New Pediatric Emergency Rooms Aurora, CO, February 25, 2017 --( The newly renovated space features five dedicated, private pediatric beds in an area decorated with bright, cheerful colors which may help to decrease anxiety in their youngest patients. Additional kid-friendly design elements include interactive tiles and kid sized equipment. The unit’s affiliation with Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children ensures that they meet the highest standards in pediatric care as set forth by RMHC. The unit includes care provided by board-certified pediatric physicians and nurses who specialize in pediatric emergencies and the safest drug dosing for children, using computerized drug dosing calculations. The specialized equipment and unique procedures for treating pediatric patients, such as “ouchless” IV starts and blood draws, as well an environment designed for safety, will help make the young patients feel as at ease as possible. “We are happy to be able to provide this special level of care, in a bright kid-friendly unit, for our youngest patients and their parents,” said Dan Miller, President and Chief Executive Officer of The Medical Center of Aurora (TMCA). “We understand that being in the emergency room is very stressful, especially when your child is the patient. We want to assure parents that we can provide comfortable appropriate care to all children in our community.” “The TMCA ER’s Pediatric Care designation with Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children gives patients access to a wide spectrum of pediatric specialty care in Denver, including the most advanced Pediatric OR in the entire country,” said Dr. Reginald Washington, Chief Medical Officer at the Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children. “If a child is in need of a higher level of care, he or she would be transferred to the Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children Pediatric Intensive Care Unit or Inpatient Pediatric Unit. It’s one of the many benefits of being part of the larger pediatric system of care.” Aurora, CO, February 25, 2017 --( PR.com )-- The Medical Center of Aurora (TMCA) announced today that its new Pediatric Emergency Rooms (ER), are open. The new ER unit is part of the Pediatric Care network within the Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children (RMHC) through HealthONE.The newly renovated space features five dedicated, private pediatric beds in an area decorated with bright, cheerful colors which may help to decrease anxiety in their youngest patients. Additional kid-friendly design elements include interactive tiles and kid sized equipment. The unit’s affiliation with Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children ensures that they meet the highest standards in pediatric care as set forth by RMHC.The unit includes care provided by board-certified pediatric physicians and nurses who specialize in pediatric emergencies and the safest drug dosing for children, using computerized drug dosing calculations. The specialized equipment and unique procedures for treating pediatric patients, such as “ouchless” IV starts and blood draws, as well an environment designed for safety, will help make the young patients feel as at ease as possible.“We are happy to be able to provide this special level of care, in a bright kid-friendly unit, for our youngest patients and their parents,” said Dan Miller, President and Chief Executive Officer of The Medical Center of Aurora (TMCA). “We understand that being in the emergency room is very stressful, especially when your child is the patient. We want to assure parents that we can provide comfortable appropriate care to all children in our community.”“The TMCA ER’s Pediatric Care designation with Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children gives patients access to a wide spectrum of pediatric specialty care in Denver, including the most advanced Pediatric OR in the entire country,” said Dr. Reginald Washington, Chief Medical Officer at the Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children. “If a child is in need of a higher level of care, he or she would be transferred to the Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children Pediatric Intensive Care Unit or Inpatient Pediatric Unit. It’s one of the many benefits of being part of the larger pediatric system of care.” Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from The Medical Center of Aurora


News Article | December 1, 2016
Site: www.PR.com

A 2013 survey conducted by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing and The Forum of State Nursing Workforce Center found that 55% of the RN workforce is age 50 or older. Oceanside, NY, December 01, 2016 --( The discussion was prompted by the results of a 2013 survey conducted by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing and The Forum of State Nursing Workforce Center which found that 55% of the RN workforce is age 50 or older, and the Health Resources and Services Administration projection that more than a million registered nurses will reach retirement age within the next 10 to 15 years. As is typical of nurses at South Nassau, the nurses on 2B, led by their nurse manager Lynn Bert, RN, NP, took action and came up with a plan. After a few weeks of meetings with Sue Penque, Ph.D., RN, CNP, South Nassau's chief nursing officer and senior vice president of patient care services, as well as their nursing colleagues throughout the hospital, Ms. Bert and her team rolled out the "Nurses 2B" program. "Nurses 2B has been designed as a first step in the solution to reducing the pending void of nursing talent caused by the aging nursing population and in recognition of our obligation to embrace and support the nurses of the future," said Dr. Penque. "By introducing high school students to the field of nursing now, we hope that it will deepen their passion for careers in nursing." A total of 26 local area high school students enrolled in and successfully completed the inaugural semester of Nurses 2B. This fall 21 students are enrolled in the program, which consists of six, 90-minute weekly seminars held on Wednesdays from 7:00-8:30pm. The seminars are presented by nurses from different areas of clinical practice, from the emergency department to the operating room, who explain their roles and responsibilities; the illnesses, diseases and injuries that they treat; and demonstrate the skills they apply to care for their patients. Upon completion of the program, students assist with a community health event hosted by the hospital, earning them volunteer hours towards their high school diplomas while working alongside registered nurses. As for the nurses who volunteer their time and talents to teach the students, they receive certificates that may be applied to Clinical Advancement Programs. Ms. Bert, however, attests that is not the motive for the selflessness of her colleagues: "Each instructor was hand-selected because I knew the positive influence each has been for me. How fortunate the students are to get a glimpse of their passion and commitment to their profession. It is my hope that the students achieve the excellence of my peers because perhaps they may be taking care of us someday." Nurses 2 B will continue to be offered biannually in the fall and spring. Ms. Bert and her team will hand deliver fliers to area high school guidance departments stating: "Attention High School Students: Are You Thinking about a Future in the Field of Nursing?" followed by an invitation to students with an interest in a nursing career to register for the "free Nurse 2B program." Oceanside, NY, December 01, 2016 --( PR.com )-- Late summer 2015, while on break for lunch, members of the nursing staff of South Nassau Communities Hospital's Pediatric Unit, also referred to as "2B" on the hospital's campus map, delved into a deep discussion about the rising percentage of the nursing workforce nearing retirement age and the declining number of new nurses entering the profession.The discussion was prompted by the results of a 2013 survey conducted by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing and The Forum of State Nursing Workforce Center which found that 55% of the RN workforce is age 50 or older, and the Health Resources and Services Administration projection that more than a million registered nurses will reach retirement age within the next 10 to 15 years.As is typical of nurses at South Nassau, the nurses on 2B, led by their nurse manager Lynn Bert, RN, NP, took action and came up with a plan. After a few weeks of meetings with Sue Penque, Ph.D., RN, CNP, South Nassau's chief nursing officer and senior vice president of patient care services, as well as their nursing colleagues throughout the hospital, Ms. Bert and her team rolled out the "Nurses 2B" program."Nurses 2B has been designed as a first step in the solution to reducing the pending void of nursing talent caused by the aging nursing population and in recognition of our obligation to embrace and support the nurses of the future," said Dr. Penque. "By introducing high school students to the field of nursing now, we hope that it will deepen their passion for careers in nursing."A total of 26 local area high school students enrolled in and successfully completed the inaugural semester of Nurses 2B. This fall 21 students are enrolled in the program, which consists of six, 90-minute weekly seminars held on Wednesdays from 7:00-8:30pm. The seminars are presented by nurses from different areas of clinical practice, from the emergency department to the operating room, who explain their roles and responsibilities; the illnesses, diseases and injuries that they treat; and demonstrate the skills they apply to care for their patients. Upon completion of the program, students assist with a community health event hosted by the hospital, earning them volunteer hours towards their high school diplomas while working alongside registered nurses.As for the nurses who volunteer their time and talents to teach the students, they receive certificates that may be applied to Clinical Advancement Programs. Ms. Bert, however, attests that is not the motive for the selflessness of her colleagues: "Each instructor was hand-selected because I knew the positive influence each has been for me. How fortunate the students are to get a glimpse of their passion and commitment to their profession. It is my hope that the students achieve the excellence of my peers because perhaps they may be taking care of us someday."Nurses 2 B will continue to be offered biannually in the fall and spring. Ms. Bert and her team will hand deliver fliers to area high school guidance departments stating: "Attention High School Students: Are You Thinking about a Future in the Field of Nursing?" followed by an invitation to students with an interest in a nursing career to register for the "free Nurse 2B program." Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from South Nassau Communities Hospital


Nicolini G.,Pediatric Unit | Sperotto F.,University of Padua | Esposito S.,University of Milan
Minerva Pediatrica | Year: 2014

Antibiotics are a cornerstone to treat bacterial infections and children received more frequently these drugs than any other class of medication. However, the improper and excessive use of antibiotics in the past decades has increased the emergence of resistant bacterial strains. Moreover, the lack of specific pediatric clinical trials on antibiotics led to a scarcity of high-evidence-level knowledge. The problem of the increase in antibiotic resistance should be known by all medical figures and probably by all members of the society, and a plan for an efficient strategy to improve antibiotic use in the entire world is highly needed. This review summarizes how antibiotics are mainly used in pediatrics and highlights the main problems related to the increase of antimicrobial-resistant bacterial strains, suggesting possible methods for reducing this increase. An excellent instrument to contain the emergence of antimicrobial resistance appeared the antibiotic stewardship program, that should be proposed and actualized in all contests in which antibiotics use is a common practice. Targeting the existing antibiotics with specific updated guidelines is also an essential measure to avoid antibiotics misuse. Moreover, educational on-line tools and their diffusions are useful strategies to diffuse knowledge on when and how to use antibiotics.


Dratviman-Storobinsky O.,The Krieger Eye Research Laboratory | Cohen Y.,Sheba Cancer Research Center | Frenkel S.,Hebrew University of Jerusalem | Pe'er J.,Hebrew University of Jerusalem | And 3 more authors.
Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science | Year: 2010

PURPOSE. Somatic mutations in codon 209 of the GNAQ gene are the first initiating events to be identified in uveal melanoma. The purpose of this study was to search for GNAQ209 mutations in conjunctival melanocytic lesions. METHODS. Forty archival samples of conjunctival melanocytic lesions (conjunctival nevi, primary acquired melanosis, and conjunctival melanoma), 27 samples of uveal melanoma, and 11 samples of uveal melanoma metastases to the liver (3 of which matched primary uveal melanoma samples)-a total of 78 samples from 75 patients- were examined for the presence of GNAQ209 mutations by using chip-based, matrix-assisted laser-desorption time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Direct sequencing was also performed. RESULTS. The GNAQ209 mutation was identified in 12 (44.5%) uveal melanoma samples and 4 (36.5%) of the 11 metastases of uveal melanoma. It was not detected in any of the other melanocytic lesions. CONCLUSIONS. The GNAQ209 mutation rate in uveal melanoma in this study is in line with the rate in other reports. The finding of the same genotype in the primary tumors and their metastases suggests that mutation in GNAQ is an early event in uveal melanoma tumorigenesis. The lack of GNAQ mutations in conjunctival melanocytic lesions suggests the involvement of a different tumorigenic pathway from that of uveal melanoma. © Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

Rolls-Royce Motor Cars has unveiled a seminal new concept in luxury, crafted for one very special customer, St Richard's Hospital Pediatric Day Surgery Unit in the marque's home town of Chichester, West Sussex. The appropriately-named Rolls-Royce SRH will allow children awaiting surgery to drive themselves to the operating theatre, through the Pediatric Unit corridors which are lined with 'traffic signs'. The experience of 'self-drive to theatre' aims to reduce child patient stress. Rolls-Royce Motor Cars welcomed two test drivers from the Pediatric Unit at St Richard's Hospital, Molly Matthews and Hari Rajyaguru, to the Home of Rolls-Royce. Molly and Hari viewed the car being unveiled in style at the company's Goodwood Studio in the same manner for all Rolls-Royces VIP customers. This exclusive event served as final validation and pre-delivery inspection of the Rolls-Royce SRH ahead of the official handover to the patients, their families and the devoted day surgery team at St Richard's Hospital. In true Rolls-Royce style, the two children and their families enjoyed VIP hospitality with one notable addition to the usual customer experience. Molly and Hari both enjoyed first drives on the Rolls-Royce production line, an exceptionally rare privilege usually reserved for the marque's Chief Executive during the validation process for new model families, and most recently actioned for the forthcoming Phantom 8. Molly, Hari and their families returned home in the chauffeured luxury of Rolls-Royce Ghosts. "We are a proud member of the community here in West Sussex. The Pediatric Unit at St Richard's Hospital, Chichester does such vital work in providing essential care to young people and their families," said Torsten Müller-Ötvös, CEO, Rolls-Royce Motor Cars. "We hope that the Rolls-Royce SRH will serve to make the experience for young people during treatment a little less stressful." Created from the ground-up by the dedicated Bespoke Manufacturing team, the Rolls-Royce SRH presents to its very important customer a landmark study in Bespoke luxury. Akin to the conception of every Rolls-Royce Bespoke commission, a restless desire to understand the customer's requirements informed every aspect of the design. The car is therefore specified with a two-tone paint-scheme of Andalusian White and Salamanca Blue and finished with a hand-applied St James Red coachline. The interior space is appointed with the same finesse and attention-to-detail afforded to every Rolls-Royce patron, with the two-tone steering wheel, seats and self-righting wheel centres perfectly colour-matched to the St James Red coachline. A top speed of 10mph is achieved in seconds courtesy of power derived from a 24 volt gel battery that propels the car with the same whisper-quietness as Rolls-Royce's magnificent V12 engines. For those preferring a more sedate journey, the speed setting is variable and can be limited to a statelier but no-less exhilarating 4mph. Sir Henry Royce's famous credo: "when it does not exist, design it," echoes around the marque's home in Goodwood, with this spirit highly evident in the conception of the Rolls-Royce SRH. The Bespoke Manufacturing team devoted over 400 hours of their own time to developing and hand-crafting this most extraordinary Rolls-Royce. In addition to developing competency in new chassis and electronic technologies, the project team also utilised 3D printing techniques for the design. This included production of the iconic Spirit of Ecstasy and the bespoke paddle controls. Lawrie Mewse, Project Leader of the Rolls-Royce SRH, said, "I am immensely proud of what the team has achieved. This project showcases the amazing skills and technology that exist in the Bespoke Manufacturing Team and across every area at the Home of Rolls Royce here at Goodwood. However, the most important thing is giving back to the local community and having a positive impact for children and their parents during their time in hospital." Marianne Griffiths, Chief Executive, of Western Sussex Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, said, "Just like the joy it will bring to our young patients, the Rolls-Royce SRH is simply priceless. It is a very special gift and one of the most wonderful donations ever received by Love Your Hospital, our trust's dedicated charity. On behalf of everyone at Western Sussex Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, I would like to say a heartfelt thank you to Rolls-Royce Motor Cars and especially the small team who volunteered so much of their own time in support of St Richard's Hospital in Chichester and the children we care for." Sue Nicholls, Paediatric Matron at Western Sussex Hospitals NSH Foundation Trust, said, "It's wonderful seeing a smiley face on the way to theatre, rather than an apprehensive one, and everyone caring for children at St Richard's is so grateful to Rolls-Royce for this unique donation. We know boys and girls alike will love driving it and in the coming years it will help turn a daunting experience into a more fun and enjoyable one for hundreds and hundreds of children." The official handover of the Rolls-Royce SRH to St Richard's Hospital will take place today. For more information including additional high resolution, downloadable photographs and video footage, visit our media website, PressClub - http://www.press.rolls-roycemotorcars.com You can also find the communications team at Rolls-Royce Motor Cars on Twitter and Instagram


Morandi A.,University of Verona | Maschio M.,University of Verona | Marigliano M.,University of Verona | Miraglia Del Giudice E.,The Second University of Naples | And 3 more authors.
Pediatric Obesity | Year: 2014

What is already known about this subject Fasting triglycerides above 1.17 mmol/L have been shown to be useful to select obese children and adolescents who may present impaired glucose tolerance in a Canadian cohort. Fasting plasma glucose is associated with the risk to present impaired glucose tolerance in several cohorts of obese children and adolescents. What this study adds When applied to Italian cohorts of obese children and adolescents, the triglycerides cut-off of 1.17 mmol/L has similar validity as in the Canadian cohort to select patients who may present impaired glucose tolerance. Fasting plasma glucose and fasting triglycerides can be combined to obtain an accurate criterion to select obese children and adolescents who may present impaired glucose tolerance. Objectives We aimed to validate fasting triglycerides>1.17mmolL-1, a criterion recently proposed for selecting obese children at risk of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and to assess whether the accuracy of triglycerides (TG) can be improved by the use of other variables. Methods We studied an Italian cohort of 817 obese children and adolescents (8-18.4 years) who underwent clinical examination, fasting blood analysis and the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). The discriminative properties of TG>1.17mmolL -1 were assessed and compared with those observed in a Canadian cohort from which this criterion was derived: 71.4 [57.8-85.1]% sensitivity and 64.1 [57.7-70.4]% specificity. The possible contribution of other variables was evaluated by assessing the net reclassification improvement (NRI), i.e., the net increase in the percentage of subjects correctly classified. Results Thirty-nine children (4.7%) had IGT. The 1.17mmolL-1 TG threshold showed 66.6 [51.8-81.4]% sensitivity and 68.2 [64.9-71.5]% specificity, thus successfully validated. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) was independently associated with IGT (odds ratio=3.86 [2.09-7.14], P<0.001), besides TG. The bivariate criterion of TG≥1.13mmolL-1 plus FPG≥4.44mmolL -1 had a 69.2 [54.7-83.7]% sensitivity and a 78.2 [76.8-79.6]% specificity, thus displaying a 12.6% NRI (P<0.001) compared with TG>1.17mmolL-1. Conclusions TG>1.17mmolL-1 is a useful criterion to detect roughly 66% of obese children with IGT through OGTT performed in about 33% of all obese children. However, the 'TG≥1.13mmolL -1 plus FPG≥4.44mmolL-1' criterion improved discrimination accuracy, leading to the possibility of detecting even more than 66% of obese children with IGT though limiting OGTT to just 25% of all obese children. © 2012 The Authors.


Cardinale F.,Pediatric Unit | Giordano P.,University of Bari | Chinellato I.,Pediatric Unit | Tesse R.,University of Bari
Allergy and Asthma Proceedings | Year: 2013

The pathophysiology of asthma is complex and involves a number of factors including atopy and bronchial hyperreactivity. A strong body of evidence suggests that structural and functional respiratory epithelial alterations play a crucial role in both development and persistence of this condition. From the onset of symptoms the airways epithelium of asthmatic patients seems to be altered and unable to repair. The interactions between the epithelium and the underlying mesenchyma, which are jointly referred to as the epithelial- mesenchymal trophic unit (EMTU), are thought to result in a self-sustaining damage of the airways and, ultimately, in a chronic inflammatory scenario. A better understanding of the relationship occurring across EMTU, environmental noxae, and factors of susceptibility to epithelial damage is likely to pave the way to future new preventive and therapeutic strategies for this condition. Copyright © 2013, OceanSide Publications, Inc., U.S.A.


De Amici M.,Pediatric Unit
Journal of biological regulators and homeostatic agents | Year: 2012

Adenoids removed for airway obstruction and-or recurrent infections have been studied to identify a possible mechanism to explain chronicity. In this regard, macrophages may play a relevant pathogenic role as well as neutrophils during bacterial infections and eosinophils in allergic inflammation. Therefore, this study aimed at investigating some mediators as surrogate markers of inflammation in children who had to undergo to adenoidectomy. Globally, 67 children (25 females, 42 males, mean age 4.9 years), affected by persistent obstruction caused by adenoid hypertrophy were consecutively enrolled into the study. Blood samples were collected from patients and controls to determine serum CD163, Myeloperoxidase (MPO) and ECP. There were significant differences between patients and controls for serum CD163 (p less than 0.0001); MPO (p less than 0.0001); serum ECP (p less than 0.0001). This study demonstrated some risk factors for severe AH: apnoea, recurrent respiratory infections, and high serum CD163 levels.


Cardinale F.,Pediatric Unit | Cappiello A.R.,Pediatric Unit | Mastrototaro M.F.,Pediatric Unit | Pignatelli M.,Pediatric Unit | Esposito S.,University of Milan
Early Human Development | Year: 2013

Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide even in industrialised countries, and its incidence is highest among children aged < 5. years. Over the last two years, three international guidelines have been updated with new evidence concerning the incidence, aetiology and management of childhood CAP, but there are still some major problems in standardisation. The main aim of this review is to consider the available data concerning the aetiology, diagnosis, evaluation of severity, and treatment of paediatric CAP. Analysis of the literature shows that there are a number of unanswered questions concerning the management of CAP, including its definition, the absence of a paediatric CAP severity score, the difficulty of identifying its aetiology, the emergence of resistance of the most frequent respiratory pathogens to the most widely used anti-infectious agents, and the lack of information concerning the changes in CAP epidemiology following the introduction of vaccines against respiratory pathogens. More research is clearly required in various areas, and further efforts are needed to increase vaccination coverage with the already available vaccines in order to reduce the occurrence of the disease. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.cnet.com

Going into surgery sucks, especially for a young child. That's why Rolls-Royce built a car specifically to lower childrens' stress levels before going under the knife. The Rolls-Royce SRH is not your average Roller. With an adjustable top speed of either 4 or 10 mph, this children's ride-on toy is a one-of-one creation for the St. Richard's Hospital Pediatric Day Surgery Unit. Children will be able to drive themselves to the operating theater through a corridor filled with little traffic signs. Rolls-Royce's in-house Bespoke Manufacturing wing spent over 400 hours of their own time building the SRH, and it shows. The project team had to learn about chassis and electronics tech, and they used 3D printing to create parts like the paddle controls and the Spirit of Ecstasy. To commemorate the SRH's build, Rolls-Royce brought two children and their families to Goodwood Studio, where they received the same VIP treatment that car buyers do. They also took drives on the production line, which is usually reserved for the CEO during new vehicle development. Their rides home were in the back seats of Rolls-Royce Ghosts. "We are a proud member of the community here in West Sussex. The Pediatric Unit at St Richard's Hospital, Chichester does such vital work in providing essential care to young people and their families," said Torsten Müller-Ötvös, CEO of Rolls-Royce Motor Cars. "We hope that the Rolls-Royce SRH will serve to make the experience for young people during treatment a little less stressful."

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