Pediatric Radiology

Newark, NJ, United States

Pediatric Radiology

Newark, NJ, United States

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A team of over 30 SPR experts reviewed each ACR Select topic to incorporate age and gender specific Pediatric indications. Led by Dr. Marta Hernanz-Shulman with guidance from Dr. Mike Bettmann, Chair of the ACR's Rapid Response Team, the experts developed AUC that cover 374 Pediatric Specific indications and 376 exams that cover 2912 clinical end points for pediatric imaging. "With the contributions of the Pediatric Radiology experts working with Dr. Hernanz-Schulman, we have gone from a limited set of a little over 100 indications to a vastly expanded set of nearly 400 indications for the pediatric population," said Dr. Michael Bettmann, MD, FACR. "That is not everything, but we have made a giant step in guiding the use of imaging in children and that is why I am excited. This simply has not existed for children before." "Children are more sensitive to radiation and they will live longer and therefore have a chance to have more studies, so you don't want to radiate unnecessarily," said Dr. Marta Hernanz-Schulman, MD, FAAP FACR, Medical Director, Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt. "Selecting the best imaging test can be a complex process, particularly in Pediatrics. We have responsibility to support physicians in making the best decisions." The SPR AUC consider patient age and ionizing radiation exposure in the guidance to ensure pediatric patients do not receive unnecessary ionizing radiation. The pediatric age range varies on different topics where alternative recommendations are made. When delivered through CareSelect Imaging, these new indications now address the clinical setting as well as patient age and gender, so that the system displays the relevant guidance for the patient. CareSelect Imaging currently contains AUC sets from multiple PAMA-qualified Provider Led Entities including the American College of Radiology (ACR Select), the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, the American College of Cardiology and the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging. The Pediatric AUC will be delivered with all future ACR Select content versions at no additional fee. National Decision Support Company will be at the 2017 SPR Annual Meeting in Booth #11. Stop by and talk with our team about how you can get started with the new pediatric content set. About National Decision Support Company National Decision Support Company delivers enterprise-wide Clinical Decision Support solutions that enable more appropriate care, improve population health, and reduce cost. NDSC's CareSelect Imaging™ converts published guidelines into actionable criteria that is delivered directly into the EMR workflow. Criteria covers adult and pediatric patient populations featuring guidelines sourced directly from the Society for Pediatric Radiology. For more information, visit www.nationaldecisionsupport.com. About CareSelect Imaging™ CareSelect Imaging expands on NDSC's foundational ACR Select™ solution to deliver a comprehensive range of Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) for diagnostic imaging in both adult and pediatric patient populations. AUC is sourced from a growing list of qualified Provider Led Entities (qPLE), including the American College of Radiology, the American College of Cardiology, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network® and the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging to ensure compliance with the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014 (PAMA). To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/society-for-pediatric-radiology-spr-experts-extend-acr-select-to-cover-pediatric-imaging-indications-and-exams-300458872.html


Sepulveda W.,Fetal Medicine Center | Mena F.,Clinica Las Condes | Ortega X.,Pediatric Radiology
Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine | Year: 2010

Fetuses with large lung tumors associated with hydrops have an almost uniformly fatal outcome if left untreated. Indeed, 2 large referral centers in America have reported a perinatal mortality rate approaching 100% in more than 50 hydropic fetuses with lung tumors managed expectantly.1-3 Fetal intervention, either with open fetal surgery1-3 or with percutaneous shunting/ablation techniques,4 can improve the survival rate, but these approaches have only being carried out in few selected cases. We report the successful percutaneous intrauterine embolization of a large echogenic lung mass in a hydropic fetus at 22 weeks' gestation. The prenatal sonographic findings, antenatal course, and perinatal management are presented.


Sornsakrin M.,Pediatric Gastroenterology and Hepatology | Helmke K.,Pediatric Radiology | Briem-Richter A.,University of Hamburg | Ganschow R.,University of Hamburg
Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition | Year: 2010

Objectives: Pediatric liver transplant recipients often need to undergo liver biopsies for the detection and specification of complications such as acute or chronic graft rejection, infection, or drug toxicity. Complications resulting from liver biopsy are rare. The aim of our single-center retrospective study was to report on liver biopsy-related complications and, moreover, to assess the significance of histological findings in correlation with the suspected diagnosis. PATIENTS AND Methods: Overall, 120 liver biopsies from 67 children were performed and analyzed. All of the biopsies were performed with ultrasound guidance using midazolam and ketamine. Results: The overall incidence of complications was 5.0%, but most of these complications were mild. In 2 cases, however, the complications were severe and required surgical intervention in addition to further medical treatment.In about 92% of the cases, liver histology confirmed the previously suspected diagnosis based on clinical and clinical laboratory indications. Conclusions: We concluded that postliver transplantation liver biopsy in children seldom provides unexpected results and, even using ultrasound guidance, has led, albeit rarely, to serious complications. We therefore now accept potential delay in treatment and reserve liver biopsy for patients who fail to respond to therapy based on clinical judgment. Copyright © 2010 by European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition and North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition.


News Article | November 1, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Stanford Medicine and Intermountain Healthcare have announced the recipients of more than $500,000 in seed grants focused on transforming healthcare. The seven research projects were chosen from a competitive field of proposals, using a vetting process similar to that used by the National Institutes of Health, which establishes selection criteria and scoring systems. "The Intermountain-Stanford grant program is part of an exciting collaboration between Intermountain and Stanford that began almost two years ago and is focused on advancing clinical care best practices, education and training and clinical research in heart disease, cancer, and other conditions. The purpose of the grant award is to spearhead and accelerate research between the two organizations and support innovative projects in research, patient care, and medical education," said Laura Kaiser, Intermountain Healthcare's Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer. "Our collaboration will foster those scientific discoveries that have potential to improve patient care in both institutions," said David Larson, MD, MBA, co-chair of the Intermountain-Stanford Collaborative Committee and Stanford University School of Medicine's Associate Professor of Pediatric Radiology and Associate Chair of Performance Improvement in the Department of Radiology. The seed grants, up to $75,000 each, were awarded to projects that will be jointly led by principal investigators from Intermountain and Stanford, and will take effect on November 1, 2016. The seven selected projects focus on genomics, machine learning, biomarkers and epidemiology, biomarkers closer to basic science research, networks of care, infectious disease, and telemedicine. Although they're from diverse clinical areas, all the studies are designed to improve patient care Following are the names of the grant recipients and their project titles: - Whole-genome DNA sequencing of stage-3 colorectal cancer -- Lincoln Nadauld, MD, PhD, Intermountain precision genomics; James Ford, MD, associate professor of oncology and of genetics at Stanford. - Baseline assessment of hand hygiene practices and ICU microbiology -- Bill Beninati, MD, Intermountain critical care medicine; Arnold Milstein, MD, MPH, professor of medicine at Stanford. - Developing a precision-based approach for the diagnosis and prognosis of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction in the community -- Kirk Knowlton, MD, Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute cardiovascular medicine; Francois Haddad, MD, clinical associate professor of cardiovascular medicine at Stanford. - Translational approaches to the mechanisms of septic cardiomyopathy -- Samuel Brown, MD, Intermountain critical care medicine; Euan Ashley, MRCP, DPhil, associate professor of cardiovascular medicine at Stanford. - Implementation and evaluation of graduating from pediatric to adult care -- Aimee Hersh, MD, department of pediatrics, University of Utah and Intermountain's Primary Children's Hospital; Korey Hood, PhD, clinical professor of pediatrics at Stanford. - Impact of donor-derived BK virus infection and immune recovery in kidney transplant recipients -- Diane Alonso, MD, Intermountain transplant services; Benjamin Pinsky, MD, PhD, assistant professor of pathology and of infectious diseases at Stanford. - Development and implementation of a digital health-care program for patients with atrial fibrillation -- Jared Bunch, MD, Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute heart-rhythm services; Mintu Turakhia, MD, assistant professor of cardiovascular medicine at Stanford. "We are privileged to collaborate with the Stanford University School of Medicine, a premier medical school and worldwide leader in science and research," said Raj Srivastava, MD, MPH, co-chair of the Intermountain-Stanford Collaborative Committee and AVP of Research at Intermountain Healthcare. "We are excited to see these initial projects launch, foster new scientific collaborations focused on improving patient care, and set the stage for the healthcare transformation potential from the Intermountain-Stanford grant program." Intermountain Healthcare is a Utah-based, not-for-profit system of 22 hospitals, 185 clinics, a Medical Group with some 1,300 employed physicians, a health plans division called SelectHealth, and other health services. Helping people live the healthiest lives possible, Intermountain is widely recognized as a leader in transforming healthcare through high quality and sustainable costs. For more information about Intermountain, visit intermountainhealthcare.org.


The International Association of HealthCare Professionals is pleased to welcome Pooja Renjen, MD, Radiologist, to their prestigious organization with her upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. Dr. Pooja Renjen is a highly trained and qualified radiologist with an extensive expertise in all facets of her work, especially pediatric radiology. Dr. Renjen has been in practice for more than 12 years and is currently serving patients within Pediatric Radiology in New York City, New York. She is also an Assistant Professor of Radiology at Weill Cornell Medical College, and an Assistant Attending Radiologist at New York-Presbyterian Hospital Weill Cornell Campus. Dr. Pooja Renjen earned her Bachelor’s Degree from Johns Hopkins University with a double major in Biology and Economics in 2000, and was elected Phi Beta Kappa upon graduation. She then attended New York University School of Medicine, where she graduated with her Medical Degree in 2004 and was inducted to the Alpha Omega Alpha. Following her graduation, Dr. Renjen completed her Internal Medicine internship at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, where she remained for her Diagnostic Radiology residency, serving as Chief Resident. She then undertook her fellowship training in Pediatric Radiology at the prestigious Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Dr. Renjen is double board certified in both Diagnostic Radiology and Pediatric Radiology, and she is renowned as an expert pediatric radiologist. With an interest in international radiology outreach and education, Dr. Renjen spent time in both Botswana and Ethiopia and founded a radiology resident elective, and has participated in teaching a pediatric radiology fellowship. To keep up to date with the latest advances in her field, she maintains a professional membership with the Radiological Society of North America. She attributes her success to her family members, experience, and the opportunity to work with excellent doctors. In her free time, Dr. Renjen enjoys traveling. Learn more about Dr. Renje here: https://weillcornell.org/prenjen and be sure to read her upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. FindaTopDoc.com is a hub for all things medicine, featuring detailed descriptions of medical professionals across all areas of expertise, and information on thousands of healthcare topics.  Each month, millions of patients use FindaTopDoc to find a doctor nearby and instantly book an appointment online or create a review.  FindaTopDoc.com features each doctor’s full professional biography highlighting their achievements, experience, patient reviews and areas of expertise.  A leading provider of valuable health information that helps empower patient and doctor alike, FindaTopDoc enables readers to live a happier and healthier life.  For more information about FindaTopDoc, visit http://www.findatopdoc.com


PubMed | Fetal Medicine, Lutheran University of Brazil, Pediatric Radiology, Grupo Hospitalar Conceicao GHC and 3 more.
Type: Case Reports | Journal: Birth defects research. Part A, Clinical and molecular teratology | Year: 2016

Gastroschisis is the most common abdominal wall defect. It is characterized by herniation of the intestine and other abdominal organs through a defect in the abdominal wall. Neuroblastoma is the most common malignant tumor observed during the neonatal period. It is a neuroendocrine tumor derived from neural crest cells that develops into the adrenal gland.We report on the undescribed association between gastrochisis and congenital neuroblastoma, diagnosised during the prenatal period. The mother was a 20-year-old healthy pregnant woman in her second pregnancy. Obstetric ultrasound examination showed a fetus presenting an abdominal wall defect on the right side of the umbilical cord, compatible with gastroschisis, and a hyperechogenic and spherical solid lesion on the left adrenal gland. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging disclosed similar features associated to a heterogeneous aspect of the liver. The diagnosis of metastatic neuroblastoma was confirmed after birth through liver biopsy. At 2 days of life, the prothrombrin time was abnormal, and the patient needed vitamin K.We cannot rule out the possibility that a clotting defect, commonly observed in disseminated malignancies such as a metastatic neuroblastoma may be associated with the etiology of the gastroschisis, as this defect may result from a thrombosis occurring around 3 to 4 weeks of gestation, a period when neuroblasts development occurs into the adrenal medulla. However, we cannot exclude the possibility that both events may have occurred simultaneously by chance.


News Article | December 2, 2015
Site: www.biosciencetechnology.com

With the aim of producing high-quality X-rays with minimal radiation exposure, particularly in children, researchers have developed a new approach to imaging patients. Surprisingly, the new technology isn’t a high-tech, high-dollar piece of machinery. Rather, it’s based on the Xbox gaming system. Using proprietary software developed for the Microsoft Kinect system, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have adapted hands-free technology used for the popular Xbox system to aid radiographers when taking X-rays. The software coupled with the Kinect system can measure thickness of body parts and check for motion, positioning and the X-ray field of view immediately before imaging, said Steven Don, M.D., associate professor of radiology at the university’s Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology. Real-time monitoring alerts technologists to factors that could compromise image quality. For example, “movement during an X-ray requires retakes, thereby increasing radiation exposure,” Don said. A feasibility study will be presented Wednesday, Dec. 2, at the Radiological Society of North America’s annual meeting in Chicago. “The goal is to produce high-quality X-ray images at a low radiation dose without repeating images,” Don said. “It sounds surprising to say that the Xbox gaming system could help us to improve medical imaging, but our study suggests that this is possible.” The technology could benefit all patients but particularly children because of their sensitivity to radiation and greater variation in body sizes, which can range from premature infants to adult-sized teenagers. Setting appropriate X-ray techniques to minimize radiation exposure depends on the thickness of the body part being imaged. High-quality X-rays are critical in determining diagnoses and treatment plans. Traditionally steel calipers have been used to measure body-part thickness for X-rays. However, calipers are “time-consuming, intrusive and often scary to kids, especially those who are sick or injured,” said Don, a pediatric radiologist who treats patients at St. Louis Children’s Hospital. “To achieve the best image quality while minimizing radiation exposure, X-ray technique needs to be based on body-part thickness,” Don said. The gaming software has an infrared sensor to measure body-part thickness automatically without patient contact. “Additionally, we use the optical camera to confirm the patient is properly positioned,” he explained. Originally developed as a motion sensor and voice and facial recognition device for the Xbox gaming system, Microsoft Kinect software allows individuals to play games hands-free, or without a standard controller. Scientists, computer specialists and other inventors have since adapted the Xbox technology for nongaming applications. Don and his colleagues, for example, combined the Microsoft Kinect 1.0 technology with proprietary software to improve X-ray imaging. With help from Washington University’s Office of Technology Management, the team applied for a patent last year. Don developed the technology with William Clayton, a former computer programmer at the School of Medicine, and Robert MacDougall, a clinical medical physicist at Boston Children’s Hospital. This year, Don and his colleagues have received funding from Washington University and The Society for Pediatric Radiology. They will use these resources to continue research with the updated Microsoft Kinect 2.0 and seek feedback from radiological technologists to improve the software. While further research and development are needed, the eventual goal is to apply the technology to new X-ray machines as well as retrofitting older equipment. “Patients, technologists and radiologists want the best quality X-rays at the lowest dose possible without repeating images,” Don said. “This technology is a tool to help achieve that goal.”


News Article | December 1, 2015
Site: phys.org

Using proprietary software developed for the Microsoft Kinect system, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have adapted hands-free technology used for the popular Xbox system to aid radiographers when taking X-rays. The software coupled with the Kinect system can measure thickness of body parts and check for motion, positioning and the X-ray field of view immediately before imaging, said Steven Don, MD, associate professor of radiology at the university's Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology. Real-time monitoring alerts technologists to factors that could compromise image quality. For example, "movement during an X-ray requires retakes, thereby increasing radiation exposure," Don said. A feasibility study will be presented Wednesday, Dec. 2, at the Radiological Society of North America's annual meeting in Chicago. "The goal is to produce high-quality X-ray images at a low radiation dose without repeating images," Don said. "It sounds surprising to say that the Xbox gaming system could help us to improve medical imaging, but our study suggests that this is possible." The technology could benefit all patients but particularly children because of their sensitivity to radiation and greater variation in body sizes, which can range from premature infants to adult-sized teenagers. Setting appropriate X-ray techniques to minimize radiation exposure depends on the thickness of the body part being imaged. High-quality X-rays are critical in determining diagnoses and treatment plans. Traditionally steel calipers have been used to measure body-part thickness for X-rays. However, calipers are a "time-consuming, intrusive and often scary to kids, especially those who are sick or injured," said Don, a pediatric radiologist who treats patients at St. Louis Children's Hospital. "To achieve the best image quality while minimizing radiation exposure, X-ray technique needs to be based on body-part thickness," Don said. The gaming software has an infrared sensor to measure body-part thickness automatically without patient contact. "Additionally, we use the optical camera to confirm the patient is properly positioned," he explained. Originally developed as a motion sensor and voice and facial recognition device for the Xbox gaming system, Microsoft Kinect software allows individuals to play games hands-free, or without a standard controller. Scientists, computer specialists and other inventors have since adapted the Xbox technology for nongaming applications. Don and his colleagues, for example, combined the Microsoft Kinect 1.0 technology with proprietary software to improve X-ray imaging. With help from Washington University's Office of Technology Management, the team applied for a patent last year. Don developed the technology with William Clayton, a former computer programmer at the School of Medicine, and Robert MacDougall, a clinical medical physicist at Boston Children's Hospital. This year, Don and his colleagues have received funding from Washington University and The Society for Pediatric Radiology. They will use these resources to continue research with the updated Microsoft Kinect 2.0 and seek feedback from radiological technologists to improve the software. While further research and development are needed, the eventual goal is to apply the technology to new X-ray machines as well as retrofitting older equipment. "Patients, technologists and radiologists want the best quality X-rays at the lowest dose possible without repeating images," Don said. "This technology is a tool to help achieve that goal."


News Article | December 1, 2015
Site: www.rdmag.com

With the aim of producing high-quality x-rays with minimal radiation exposure, particularly in children, researchers have developed a new approach to imaging patients. Surprisingly, the new technology isn’t a high-tech, high-dollar piece of machinery. Rather, it’s based on the Xbox gaming system. Using proprietary software developed for the Microsoft Kinect system, researchers at Washington Univ. School of Medicine in St. Louis have adapted hands-free technology used for the popular Xbox system to aid radiographers when taking x-rays. The software coupled with the Kinect system can measure thickness of body parts and check for motion, positioning and the x-ray field of view immediately before imaging, said Steven Don, MD, associate professor of radiology at the university’s Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology. Real-time monitoring alerts technologists to factors that could compromise image quality. For example, “movement during an x-ray requires retakes, thereby increasing radiation exposure,” Don said. “The goal is to produce high-quality x-ray images at a low radiation dose without repeating images,” Don said. “It sounds surprising to say that the Xbox gaming system could help us to improve medical imaging, but our study suggests that this is possible.” The technology could benefit all patients but particularly children because of their sensitivity to radiation and greater variation in body sizes, which can range from premature infants to adult-sized teenagers. Setting appropriate x-ray techniques to minimize radiation exposure depends on the thickness of the body part being imaged. High-quality x-rays are critical in determining diagnoses and treatment plans. Traditionally steel calipers have been used to measure body-part thickness for x-rays. However, calipers are “time-consuming, intrusive and often scary to kids, especially those who are sick or injured,” said Don, a pediatric radiologist who treats patients at St. Louis Children’s Hospital. “To achieve the best image quality while minimizing radiation exposure, x-ray technique needs to be based on body-part thickness,” Don said. The gaming software has an infrared sensor to measure body-part thickness automatically without patient contact. “Additionally, we use the optical camera to confirm the patient is properly positioned,” he explained. Originally developed as a motion sensor and voice and facial recognition device for the Xbox gaming system, Microsoft Kinect software allows individuals to play games hands-free, or without a standard controller. Scientists, computer specialists and other inventors have since adapted the Xbox technology for nongaming applications. Don and his colleagues, for example, combined the Microsoft Kinect 1.0 technology with proprietary software to improve x-ray imaging. With help from Washington Univ.’s Office of Technology Management, the team applied for a patent last year. Don developed the technology with William Clayton, a former computer programmer at the School of Medicine, and Robert MacDougall, a clinical medical physicist at Boston Children’s Hospital. This year, Don and his colleagues have received funding from Washington Univ. and The Society for Pediatric Radiology. They will use these resources to continue research with the updated Microsoft Kinect 2.0 and seek feedback from radiological technologists to improve the software. While further research and development are needed, the eventual goal is to apply the technology to new x-ray machines as well as retrofitting older equipment. “Patients, technologists and radiologists want the best quality x-rays at the lowest dose possible without repeating images,” Don said. “This technology is a tool to help achieve that goal.”

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