Plano, TX, United States
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An internationally recognized expert on pediatric ophthalmology, Dr. Steven J. Lichtenstein sees Avenova as an important advance in the treatment of children's eye conditions PEORIA, IL--(Marketwired - Dec 19, 2016) - The Illinois Eye Center announced today that one of its top ophthalmologists, Steven J. Lichtenstein, M.D, has written an article [http://www.illinoiseyecenter.com/about/press-releases/avenova-neutrox-brings-quick-relief-children-suffering-eye-conditions/] describing an important new advance, Avenova from NovaBay® Pharmaceuticals, Inc. ( : NBY), for the management of children's eye conditions. "When we think of often-painful eye conditions like blepharitis and dry eye, we usually assume that the patients are adults," Dr. Lichtenstein writes. "But that's not true. I see a surprising number of children who are suffering from these conditions." Some have blepharitis, where bacteria on the eyelids contribute to inflammation, pain, and a crusty build-up of debris on the eyelids. Others suffer from blockages of small glands near the eyelid margin, called meibomian glands. The blockage can cause dry eye, inflammation, discomfort or even small painful bumps called chalazions. "In fact, children can be especially at risk for these conditions," Dr. Lichtenstein writes. That's because these problems are caused or exacerbated by bacteria and tiny parasitic mites that live on the eyelids -- and children may add to the microbial populations by rubbing their eyes or failing to wash their faces frequently. "Doctors used to treat these young patients with warm compresses, antibiotics, or steroids," Dr. Lichtenstein explains. "But none of these is ideal," he writes. The warm compresses typically bring only temporary relief, while steroids and antibiotics have significant side effects that are often more worrisome in children than in adults. "Now, there's a more effective and safer approach," he writes. It is an eyelid hygiene product called Avenova® with Neutrox from NovaBay Pharmaceuticals. Dr. Lichtenstein explains that Avenova contains pure hypochlorous acid (Neutrox). Neutrox kills bacteria and prevents the proliferation of mites. That directly fights the underlying cause of blepharitis, meibomian gland blockage, and other problems -- and is completely safe. "I've had great results using twice-daily wipes with Avenova for children with blepharitis and other conditions," Dr. Lichtenstein writes. The approach quickly reduces inflammation, pain, and other problems. Children also say that Avenova feels refreshing and brings quick relief, and parents like the fact that Avenova is easy to apply to children's lids. "Avenova has become first line therapy for my young patients," Dr. Lichtenstein concludes. In addition to his private practice at the Illinois Eye Center, Steven J. Lichtenstein, M.D., F.A.A.P., F.A.C.S., F.A.A.O. is an Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery and Pediatrics at the University of Illinois College of Medicine, and Medical Director of Pediatric Ophthalmology at Children's Hospital of Illinois.


Jost R.M.,Crystal Charity Ball Pediatric Vision Evaluation Center | Yanni S.E.,Crystal Charity Ball Pediatric Vision Evaluation Center | Beauchamp C.L.,Center for Adult Strabismus | Stager Sr. D.R.,Center for Adult Strabismus | And 4 more authors.
JAMA Ophthalmology | Year: 2014

IMPORTANCE: Commercially available automated vision screening devices assess refractive risk factors, not amblyopia or strabismus, underreferring affected children and overreferring healthy children. Nearly half of affected children are not identified until after age 5 years, when treatment is less effective. OBJECTIVES: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of the Pediatric Vision Scanner (PVS), a binocular retinal birefringence scanner, to objectively identify strabismus and amblyopia, and to compare retinal birefringence screening with a widely used automated pediatric screening device. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Three hundred consecutive preschool children (aged 2-6 years)were screened using the PVS and the SureSight Autorefractor at 2 pediatric ophthalmology private practices. A masked comprehensive pediatric ophthalmic examination provided the gold standard for determining sensitivity and specificity for each screening device. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: The primary outcomewas sensitivity and specificity of the PVS for detecting the targeted conditions, strabismus and amblyopia, in children aged 2 to 6 years. Secondary outcomes included the positive and negative likelihood ratios of the PVS for identifying the targeted conditions. In addition, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative likelihood ratios of the SureSight Autorefractor for the targeted conditions were assessed in the same cohort of children. RESULTS: Of the 300 patients, 188 had strabismus only, amblyopia only, or both, and 112 had no strabismus or amblyopia. The sensitivity of the PVS to detect strabismus and amblyopia (0.97; 95%CI, 0.94-1.00) was significantly higher than that of the SureSight Autorefractor (0.74; 95%CI, 0.66-0.83). Specificity of the PVS for strabismus and amblyopia (0.87; 95%CI, 0.80-0.95) was significantly higher than that of the SureSight Autorefractor (0.62; 95%CI, 0.50-0.73). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: The PVS identified children with strabismus and/or amblyopia with high sensitivity, outperforming the SureSight Autorefractor. Accurate, early detection of these conditions could improve long-term vision outcomes of affected preschool children. Copyright 2014 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.


Ketterl T.G.,University of Minnesota | Messinger Y.H.,Pediatric Hematology Oncology Childrens Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota | Niess D.R.,Pediatric Hematology Oncology Childrens Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota | Gilles E.,Pediatric Neurology Childrens Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota | And 3 more authors.
Pediatric Blood and Cancer | Year: 2013

Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) may be associated with ANNA-1 (anti-Hu) autoantibodies. The standard treatment with IVIG, steroids, and anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody may fail, and optimal therapy is unknown. A patient developed OMS with high-titer ANNA-1 following recovery from neuroblastoma. She failed standard therapy and had only transient response to rituximab. Treatment with the humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody ofatumumab combined with methotrexate resulted in transient neurologic improvement and decrease of ANNA-1. This suggests that ofatumumab combined with methotrexate should further be considered OMS patients, particularly in refractory disease. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2013;60:E163-E165. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Jethani J.,Pediatric Ophthalmology | Shah K.,M and J Western Regional Institute of Ophthalmology | Jethani M.,Eye-Q
Indian Journal of Ophthalmology | Year: 2015

Background and Aim: Central corneal thickness (CCT) of term and preterm infants in Indian population is not known. We did a prospective noninterventional study to measure the CCT in term and preterm infants. Materials and Methods: An ultrasonic pachymeter was used. The data regarding the date of birth, expected date of delivery, birth weight were recorded. The preterm and the term infants were followed up at 8 weeks, 20 weeks and at 1-year. Results: A total of 85 (170 eyes) children were included in the study. The mean age was 264.6 ± 21.8 days postconception. The mean birth weight and CCT were 1834.4 ± 512.1 g and 595.8 ± 72.4 μ respectively. A comparison of CCT on the basis postgestational age showed a mean thickness of 620.7 ± 88.8 and 574.4 ± 78.3 μ in the <260 days and >260 days age groups respectively. The difference was statistically significant (Student's test, P = 0.002). The CCT of preterm infants (<260 days) decreased from a mean value of 620.7 ± 88.8 μ to 534.1 ± 57.6 μ at the end of 1-year. Conclusion: We present the data of CCT in term and preterm infants in Indian population. We believe that the premature babies have slightly thicker corneas than mature term babies.


Beligere N.,University of Illinois at Chicago | Perumalswamy V.,Pediatric Ophthalmology | Tandon M.,Vitrio Retinal Surgery | Mittal A.,Pediatric Ophthalmology | And 3 more authors.
Seminars in Fetal and Neonatal Medicine | Year: 2015

Prematurity is a major global health issue leading to high mortality and morbidity among the survivors. Neurodevelopmental disability (NDD) and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) are the most common complications of prematurity. In fact, ROP is the second leading cause of childhood blindness in the world. Although there is much information regarding the occurrence of ROP and of NDD in premature infants, there have been few studies on ROP and its association with NDD. The objectives of this article are to review the current literature on the subject and to publish our own findings concerning the association between ROP and NDD in premature infants. The review suggests that although NDDs are related to degree of prematurity, NDD could also be the result of visual impairments resulting from ROP. Our own study shows a close association between NDD and zonal involvement of ROP: higher NDD if zone 1 is involved and less if zone 3 is involved. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | Ophthalmic Therapy, Vitrio Retinal Surgery, Pediatric Ophthalmology, University of Illinois at Chicago and Bio Statistics
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Seminars in fetal & neonatal medicine | Year: 2015

Prematurity is a major global health issue leading to high mortality and morbidity among the survivors. Neurodevelopmental disability (NDD) and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) are the most common complications of prematurity. In fact, ROP is the second leading cause of childhood blindness in the world. Although there is much information regarding the occurrence of ROP and of NDD in premature infants, there have been few studies on ROP and its association with NDD. The objectives of this article are to review the current literature on the subject and to publish our own findings concerning the association between ROP and NDD in premature infants. The review suggests that although NDDs are related to degree of prematurity, NDD could also be the result of visual impairments resulting from ROP. Our own study shows a close association between NDD and zonal involvement of ROP: higher NDD if zone 1 is involved and less if zone 3 is involved.


PubMed | Pediatric Ophthalmology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Indian journal of ophthalmology | Year: 2015

Central corneal thickness (CCT) of term and preterm infants in Indian population is not known. We did a prospective noninterventional study to measure the CCT in term and preterm infants.An ultrasonic pachymeter was used. The data regarding the date of birth, expected date of delivery, birth weight were recorded. The preterm and the term infants were followed up at 8 weeks, 20 weeks and at 1-year.A total of 85 (170 eyes) children were included in the study. The mean age was 264.6 21.8 days postconception. The mean birth weight and CCT were 1834.4 512.1 g and 595.8 72.4 respectively. A comparison of CCT on the basis postgestational age showed a mean thickness of 620.7 88.8 and 574.4 78.3 in the <260 days and >260 days age groups respectively. The difference was statistically significant (Students test, P = 0.002). The CCT of preterm infants (<260 days) decreased from a mean value of 620.7 88.8 to 534.1 57.6 at the end of 1-year.We present the data of CCT in term and preterm infants in Indian population. We believe that the premature babies have slightly thicker corneas than mature term babies.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

After more than two decades of setting new standards in pediatric ophthalmology across New York, leading eye surgeon James M. Doyle, MD has chosen North Shore Eye Care and pediatric ophthalmologist Nechama Shoshani, MD to continue his legacy of care as he retires from the practice of medicine, according to Jeffrey Martin, MD, CEO of SightMD and Managing Partner of North Shore Eye Care. “Dr. Doyle was among the most renowned pediatric ophthalmologists not only in the greater New York area, but across the tri-state area and as far away as Texas,” said Dr. Martin. “It was not unusual for patients from as far east as Montauk and as far west as Texas to fly into New York to see Dr. Doyle. It is an honor for North Shore Eye Care to continue his legacy in pediatric ophthalmology as one of our SightMD providers,” he said. Dr. Martin was quick to point out, however, that pediatric ophthalmologist Nechama ‘Mina’ Shoshani, MD has now joined North Shore Eye Care a division of SightMD and will practice out of Dr. Doyle’s former practice located at 119 Park Avenue, Suite 208. Rockville Centre, NY 11570. “We could not have found a more qualified, personable and professional physician to continue the tradition of eye care excellence that Dr. Doyle established during his career,” said Dr. Martin. “Dr. Shoshani is Fellowship-trained in both pediatrics and adult strabismus, has conducted extensive research and published numerous articles in peer-reviewed journals. We think she is the perfect fit for our new Rockville Centre location.” Prior to joining North Shore Eye Care a division of SightMD, Dr. Shoshani was practicing in Yorktown Heights and was affiliated with Montefiore Medical Center. She received her medical degree from Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and has been practicing for nearly 10 years. She completed her fellowship in pediatric ophthalmology and adult strabismus at the Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx and is board-certified by the American Board of Ophthalmology. “Joining North Shore Eye Care and continuing Dr. Doyle’s legacy is a tremendous opportunity for me,” said Dr. Shoshani. “I know that all of the physicians at North Shore Eye Care and SightMD are committed to unsurpassed patient care and leading edge technology, so I feel honored to be part of this comprehensive eye care team.” Dr. Shoshani is an active member in the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, the Greater New York Society for Pediatric Ophthalmology & Strabismus and the American Medical Association. She is fluent in English, Hebrew and medical Spanish and has won numerous awards for fencing during her collegiate career. North Shore Eye Care, a division of SightMD is Long Island’s most established full-service comprehensive eye care provider. This year they are celebrating 54 years of eye care excellence since Dr. Sidney Martin founded the practice in 1962. North Shore Eye Care the official LASIK Providers of the New York Mets. Many of their doctors have been voted ‘TOP DOCTORS’ in the New York Metro Area by Castle Connolly and North Shore Eye Care has earned ‘Best Of Long Island’ honors for the past few years. North Shore Eye Care, a division of SightMD, maintains offices in Smithtown, Riverhead, Holbrook, Deer Park, Southampton, Southold, Garden City, Rockville Center, Hempstead, Huntington, and Queens. They specialize in cataract care, LASIK laser vision correction, glaucoma management, diabetic eye disease, ocular plastic surgery, pediatric ophthalmology, and retinal care. . For more information about North Shore Eye Care, please contact Jacqueline Hernandez at 855-295-4144.

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