Pediatric Neurology Clinic

West Jerusalem, Israel

Pediatric Neurology Clinic

West Jerusalem, Israel

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Woderska A.,Nicolaus Copernicus University | Jasinski M.,Center of Oncology of Poland | Arszynska-Lopatka D.,University Hospital No. 2 | Slupski M.,Nicolaus Copernicus University | And 2 more authors.
Annals of Transplantation | Year: 2012

Background: Maternal brain death during pregnancy is an exceptional case when somatic support might be continued despite diagnosed death. There are only a few cases of maternal brain death during pregnancy reported in the literature and detailed data regarding the frequency of such cases are lacking. Case Report: The case of a 40-year-old woman, diagnosed brain dead due to a subarachnoid and intracranial hemorrhage in the 21 st week of pregnancy is presented. The patient was admitted to the neurosurgery department and then to the intensive care unit, where brain death was diagnosed. The medical team decided to perform a caesarean section, and a living female infant was delivered. After delivery, maternal kidneys were recovered and successfully transplanted. Conclusions: This challenging case indicates that prompt diagnosis of maternal brain death is required to facilitate decision-making regarding somatic support prolongation to save the life of the fetus, as well as to allow procurement of the maternal organs. © Ann Transplant.


Cassuto H.,Pediatric Neurology Clinic | Ben-Simon A.,National Institute for Testing and Evaluation | Berger I.,Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Frontiers in Human Neuroscience | Year: 2013

This study examined the effect of the incorporation of environmental distractors in computerized continuous performance test (CPT) on the ability of the test in distinguishing ADHD from non-ADHD children. It was hypothesized that children with ADHD would display more distractibility than controls while performing CPT as measured by omission errors in the presence of pure visual, pure auditory, and a combination of visual and auditory distracting stimuli. Participants were 663 children aged 7-12 years, of them 345 diagnosed with ADHD and 318 without ADHD. Results showed that ADHD children demonstrated more omission errors than their healthy peers in all CPT conditions (no distractors, pure visual or auditory distractors and combined distractors). However, ADHD and non-ADHD children differed in their reaction to distracting stimuli; while all types of distracting stimuli increased the rate of omission errors in ADHD children, only combined visual and auditory distractors increased it in non-ADHD children. Given the low ecological validity of many CPT, these findings suggest that incorporating distractors in CPT improves the ability to distinguish ADHD from non-ADHD children. © 2013 Cassuto, Ben-Simon and Berger.


PubMed | Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Pediatric Neurology Clinic
Type: | Journal: Journal of neuroscience methods | Year: 2014

Diagnosis of ADHD in adolescents involves specific challenges. Conventional CPTs may fail to consistently distinguish ADHD from non-ADHD due to insufficient cognitive demands. The aim of this study was to explore whether the incorporation of environmental distractors into a CPT would increase its ability to distinguish ADHD from non-ADHD adolescents.Using the rate of omission errors as a measure of difficulty in sustained attention, this study examined whether ADHD adolescents are more distracted than controls and which type of distractors is more effective in terms of ADHD diagnosis. The study employed the MOXO-CPT version which includes visual and auditory stimuli serving as distractors. Participants were 176 adolescents aged 13-18 years, 133 diagnosed with ADHD and 43 without ADHD.Results showed that ADHD adolescents produced significantly more omission errors in the presence of pure visual distractors and the combination of visual and auditory distractors than in no-distractors conditions. Distracting stimuli had no effect on CPT performance of non-ADHD adolescents. ROC analysis further demonstrated that the mere presence of distractors improved the utility of the test.This study provides evidence that incorporation of environmental distractors into a CPT is useful in term of ADHD diagnosis. ADHD adolescents were more distracted than controls by all types of environmental distractors. ADHD adolescents were more distracted by pure visual distractors and by the combination of distractors than by pure auditory ones.


PubMed | Pediatric Neurology Clinic
Type: | Journal: Frontiers in human neuroscience | Year: 2013

This study examined the effect of the incorporation of environmental distractors in computerized continuous performance test (CPT) on the ability of the test in distinguishing ADHD from non-ADHD children. It was hypothesized that children with ADHD would display more distractibility than controls while performing CPT as measured by omission errors in the presence of pure visual, pure auditory, and a combination of visual and auditory distracting stimuli. Participants were 663 children aged 7-12 years, of them 345 diagnosed with ADHD and 318 without ADHD. Results showed that ADHD children demonstrated more omission errors than their healthy peers in all CPT conditions (no distractors, pure visual or auditory distractors and combined distractors). However, ADHD and non-ADHD children differed in their reaction to distracting stimuli; while all types of distracting stimuli increased the rate of omission errors in ADHD children, only combined visual and auditory distractors increased it in non-ADHD children. Given the low ecological validity of many CPT, these findings suggest that incorporating distractors in CPT improves the ability to distinguish ADHD from non-ADHD children.

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