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Sholomovich L.,Pediatric Intensive Care Unit | Magnezi R.,Bar - Ilan University
American Journal of Infection Control | Year: 2017

Hospital-acquired infections are the most common complication of treatment and the primary patient safety hazard. Hand hygiene (HH) is the most important tool for preventing these infections. Although thousands of research projects have been conducted, many articles written, and numerous therapeutic recommendations made, the goal has not yet been reached. The professional literature emphasizes that the reasons HH strategies fail are still only partially understood. The aim of this study was to examine the correlation between the psychological safety of an organization's nursing staff and its sense of personal responsibility for avoiding transmission of infections. Questionnaires were distributed to the 400 nurses in a children's hospital. Nurses' psychological safety and sense of responsibility for transmitting infections were positively correlated (r = 0.425; P < .001). In addition, 209 respondents (95.7%) believe that transmission of resistant infections between patients is preventable and 74% agree that transmission of infections is the responsibility of the care staff, but only 40% were willing to take personal responsibility in the department in which they were employed. There is a correlation between nurses' psychological safety and sense of responsibility for transmitting infections. To increase workers' sense of personal responsibility regarding infections as a way to increase the response to HH, hospital management must work toward increasing workers' psychological safety. © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc.


Seventh-largest U.S. hospital system implements Avaya Fabric Connect networking and communications applications to become a top tech healthcare organization SANTA CLARA, CA--(Marketwired - February 20, 2017) - For Erlanger Health System, the path to achieving their strategic vision of becoming a top technology-enabled healthcare organization meant careful consideration of possibilities, alternatives and risks at every step on the way. Selecting Avaya was one of the first decisions the organization made in order to provide the networking foundation to help make their vision a reality and carry it into the future. With an impending installation of an Electronic Health Records (EHR) system, Erlanger needed a network on which it could rely that could meet requirements for speed, bandwidth and security. Since the Chattanooga, TN-based organization uses a number of critical applications and adds devices on a regular basis, the network to needed flexibility and simplicity. The network would also need to enable Erlanger to share its communications system with other sites in the healthcare system. Avaya Fabric Connect networking prepared Erlanger Health System for its EHR implementation and more, providing the flexibility and expandability for the organization to continue moving toward its goal to become one of the Top 100 Most Wired hospitals. The system is easier to maintain than its previous network: certified engineers can make changes at the edge -- such as adding medical devices -- and have them reflected in the core. Erlanger also added Avaya Team and Customer Engagement solutions to provide powerful communications features and conferencing. Configuration and use is much easier; IT staffers with less experience can get the phones up and running quickly when a new one is needed without needing to program a switch. End-users enjoy a number of features, such as receiving their voicemail messages as a file in their email. The organization was able to extend its phone system over the Fabric Connect network to support a new hospital opened at Erlanger East, helping to lower operating cost and provide more efficient communications between locations. "One thing about healthcare is that, between Health Information Management and ensuring we comply with regulations and standards, we have to make sure we're doing the right thing for our patients but also following the rules and guidelines set forth by joint commissions. Avaya did everything they said they'd do and even went above and beyond. The hardware has been spot-on, and we have not had any failures with the network or phone switches. So far, Avaya has been very good for us, and very cost effective -- and in our line of work, those are two things that you need." Eric Hammer, Senior Director of Technical Services, Erlanger Health System Read more about Erlanger Health System and its implementation of Avaya Networking as its foundation for the future here. About Erlanger Health System The Erlanger Health System is a multi-hospital system with five hospitals based in Chattanooga: the Baroness Hospital, Children's Hospital at Erlanger, Erlanger North Hospital, Erlanger East Hospital, and Erlanger Bledsoe Hospital, located in Pikeville, TN. Erlanger is the seventh largest public hospital in the United States and has been recognized as "Chattanooga's number one hospital" by U.S. News and World Report. Erlanger is the tri-state region's only Level I Trauma Center, providing the highest level of trauma care for adults. Erlanger has five LIFE FORCE air ambulances in its fleet, two based in Tennessee, two in North Georgia and one in Winchester, TN. Children's Hospital at Erlanger houses the region's only Level IV Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, as well as a pediatric trauma team, Emergency Center, and Pediatric Intensive Care Unit. Erlanger also serves as the region's only academic teaching hospital, affiliated with the University of Tennessee College of Medicine Chattanooga Campus. Each year, more than a quarter of a million people are treated by the team of healthcare professionals who are part of Erlanger. About Avaya Avaya enables the mission critical, real-time communication applications of the world's most important operations. As the global leader in delivering superior communications experiences, Avaya provides the most complete portfolio of software and services for contact center and unified communications with integrated, secure networking -- offered on premises, in the cloud, or a hybrid. Today's digital world requires some form of communications enablement, and no other company is better positioned to do this than Avaya. For more information, please visit www.avaya.com. Follow Avaya on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, LinkedIn and the Avaya Connected Blog. Certain statements contained in this press release are forward-looking statements. These statements may be identified by the use of forward-looking terminology such as "anticipate," "believe," "continue," "could," "estimate," "expect," "intend," "may," "might," "plan," "potential," "predict," "should" or "will" or other similar terminology. We have based these forward-looking statements on our current expectations, assumptions, estimates and projections. While we believe these expectations, assumptions, estimates and projections are reasonable, such forward-looking statements are only predictions and involve known and unknown risks and uncertainties, many of which are beyond our control. These and other important factors may cause our actual results, performance or achievements to differ materially from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements. For a list and description of such risks and uncertainties, please refer to Avaya's filings with the SEC that are available at www.sec.gov. Avaya disclaims any intention or obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.


Ben-Ari J.,Pediatric Intensive Care Unit | Wolach O.,Davidoff Cancer Center | Gavrieli R.,Tel Aviv University | Wolach B.,Tel Aviv University
Expert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy | Year: 2012

Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited primary immunodeficiency characterized by the absence or malfunction of the NADPH oxidase in phagocytic cells. As a result, there is an impaired ability to generate superoxide anions and the subsequent reactive oxygen intermediates. Consequently, CGD patients suffer from two clinical manifestations: recurrent, life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections and excessive inflammatory reactions leading to granulomatous lesions. Although the genotype of CGD was linked to the phenotypic expression of the disease, this connection is still controversial and poorly understood. Certain correlations were reported, but the clinical expression of the disease is usually unpredictable, regardless of the pattern of inheritance. CGD mainly affects the lungs, lymph nodes, skin, GI tract and liver. Patients are particularly susceptible to catalase-positive microorganisms, including Staphyloccocus aureus, Nocardia spp. and Gram-negative bacteria, such as Serratia marcescens, Burkholderia cepacea and Salmonella spp. Unusually, catalase-negative microorganisms were reported as well. New antibacterial and antimycotic agents considerably improved the prognosis of CGD. Therapy with IFN-γ is still controversial. Bone marrow stem cell transplantation is currently the only curative treatment and gene therapy needs further development. In this article, the authors discuss the genetic, functional and molecular aspects of CGD and their impact on the clinical expression, infectious complications and the hyperinflammatory state. © 2012 2012 Expert Reviews Ltd.


Sion-Sarid R.,Pediatric Intensive Care Unit | Cohen J.,Tel Aviv University | Houri Z.,Pediatric Intensive Care Unit | Singer P.,Tel Aviv University
Nutrition | Year: 2013

The metabolic response of critically ill children is characterized by an increase in resting energy expenditure and metabolism, and energy needs of the critically ill child are dynamic, changing from a hypermetabolic to hypometabolic state through the continuum of the intensive care unit (ICU) stay. It therefore appears essential to have a precise evaluation of energy needs in these patients in order to avoid underfeeding and overfeeding, loss of critical lean body mass, and worsening of any existing nutrient deficiencies. However, there are no clear definitions regarding either the exact requirements or the ideal method for determining metabolic needs. In clinical practice, energy needs are determined either by using predictive equations or by actual measurement using indirect calorimetry. Although many equations exist for predicting resting energy expenditure, their accuracy is not clear. In addition, very few clinical trials have been performed so that no firm evidence-based recommendations are available regarding optimal nutritional management of critically ill children and infants. Most studies have come to the same conclusion (i.e., current predictive equations do not accurately predict required energy needs in the pediatric ICU population and predictive equations are unreliable compared with indirect calorimetry). The recent American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition clinical guidelines for nutrition support of the critically ill child suggest that indirect calorimetry measurements be obtained when possible in pediatric patients with suspected metabolic alterations or malnutrition, according to a list of criteria that may lead to metabolic instability, thus making standardized predictive equations even less reliable. Although the standard use of indirect calorimetry is limited due to equipment availability, staffing, and cost, the accuracy of the commercially available devices continues to improve and the measurements have become more reliable and easier to perform. In the absence of sufficient data, prospective controlled studies need to be conducted in order to evaluate the benefit of tight calorie control achieved by accurately measuring the energy needs of the critically ill child. Optimizing measuring techniques could make this more feasible and decrease the need to rely on inaccurate equations while providing appropriate energy requirements. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.


Kadmon G.,Pediatric Intensive Care Unit | Chung S.A.,Youthdale Child and Adolescent Sleep Center | Shapiro C.M.,Youthdale Child and Adolescent Sleep Center
International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology | Year: 2014

Background: Pediatric obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a prevalent but under-diagnosed disease. The importance of screening for OSA has been emphasized in the recently published guidelines for the diagnosis and management of childhood OSA. Several pediatric OSA questionnaires are available, but are complicated to use or not sensitive enough for screening. Methods: In this study we developed an 8-item (IF SLEEPY) screening tool for pediatric OSA. One hundred and fifty children referred for evaluation at a pediatric sleep clinic and their parents completed the questionnaire and had a polysomnography. Two further questionnaires were developed: I SLEEPY and I'M SLEEPY versions. The questionnaires' scores were compared to the apnea hypopnea index (AHI) and the validity of each questionnaire was evaluated. Results: The I'M SLEEPY version was found to have the highest sensitivity (82%) and a modest specificity (50%) for OSA diagnosis. Conclusion: I'M SLEEPY is a sensitive and easy-to-use screening tool for pediatric OSA. It is intended to be used by the primary physician in every suspected case of OSA. Larger studies are needed in the primary care setting for the validation of this tool. © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


Giannini A.,Pediatric Intensive Care Unit | Miccinesi G.,Instituto per Lo Studio e la Prevenzione Oncologica
Pediatric Critical Care Medicine | Year: 2011

Objective: To investigate parental presence and visiting policies in Italian pediatric intensive care units (PICUs). Design: Descriptive survey. Setting: All 34 Italian PICUs. Patients: Patients were not involved in this work. Interventions: None. Measurements And Main Results: A questionnaire was sent to the unit heads. Response rate was 100%. Median daily visiting time for parents was 300 mins; for other visitors, it was 120 mins. Twelve percent of PICUs had unrestricted policies; 59% did not allow the constant presence of a parent, even during the day. Visits from other relatives and from nonfamily were not permitted in 35% and 88% of units, respectively. Policies were not modified for a dying patient in 6% of PICUs. Children's visits were not allowed in 76% of units. Cardiac surgical PICUs were more likely to have restrictive visiting hours. Parents were permitted to be present at the bedside during ordinary nursing procedures, invasive procedures or cardiopulmonary resuscitation in 62%, 3%, and 9% of PICUs, respectively. No waiting room was provided in 32% of PICUs. Gowning procedures were compulsory for visitors in 94% of units. In 48% of PICUs, a formal process of revising visiting policies was ongoing. On patient admission, 77% of PICUs provided the family with informative material on the unit. Phone information on the patient was given frequently (often/always, 70% of PICUs). Conclusions: In Italian PICUs, there is a marked tendency to apply restrictive visiting policies, not to allow parents 24-hr access at bedside, and to limit the presence of parents during procedures and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. A revision of current policies has begun, signaling a readiness for change. Copyright © 2011 by the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies.


News Article | February 25, 2017
Site: www.PR.com

Receive press releases from The Medical Center of Aurora: By Email The Medical Center of Aurora Opens New Pediatric Emergency Rooms Aurora, CO, February 25, 2017 --( The newly renovated space features five dedicated, private pediatric beds in an area decorated with bright, cheerful colors which may help to decrease anxiety in their youngest patients. Additional kid-friendly design elements include interactive tiles and kid sized equipment. The unit’s affiliation with Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children ensures that they meet the highest standards in pediatric care as set forth by RMHC. The unit includes care provided by board-certified pediatric physicians and nurses who specialize in pediatric emergencies and the safest drug dosing for children, using computerized drug dosing calculations. The specialized equipment and unique procedures for treating pediatric patients, such as “ouchless” IV starts and blood draws, as well an environment designed for safety, will help make the young patients feel as at ease as possible. “We are happy to be able to provide this special level of care, in a bright kid-friendly unit, for our youngest patients and their parents,” said Dan Miller, President and Chief Executive Officer of The Medical Center of Aurora (TMCA). “We understand that being in the emergency room is very stressful, especially when your child is the patient. We want to assure parents that we can provide comfortable appropriate care to all children in our community.” “The TMCA ER’s Pediatric Care designation with Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children gives patients access to a wide spectrum of pediatric specialty care in Denver, including the most advanced Pediatric OR in the entire country,” said Dr. Reginald Washington, Chief Medical Officer at the Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children. “If a child is in need of a higher level of care, he or she would be transferred to the Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children Pediatric Intensive Care Unit or Inpatient Pediatric Unit. It’s one of the many benefits of being part of the larger pediatric system of care.” Aurora, CO, February 25, 2017 --( PR.com )-- The Medical Center of Aurora (TMCA) announced today that its new Pediatric Emergency Rooms (ER), are open. The new ER unit is part of the Pediatric Care network within the Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children (RMHC) through HealthONE.The newly renovated space features five dedicated, private pediatric beds in an area decorated with bright, cheerful colors which may help to decrease anxiety in their youngest patients. Additional kid-friendly design elements include interactive tiles and kid sized equipment. The unit’s affiliation with Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children ensures that they meet the highest standards in pediatric care as set forth by RMHC.The unit includes care provided by board-certified pediatric physicians and nurses who specialize in pediatric emergencies and the safest drug dosing for children, using computerized drug dosing calculations. The specialized equipment and unique procedures for treating pediatric patients, such as “ouchless” IV starts and blood draws, as well an environment designed for safety, will help make the young patients feel as at ease as possible.“We are happy to be able to provide this special level of care, in a bright kid-friendly unit, for our youngest patients and their parents,” said Dan Miller, President and Chief Executive Officer of The Medical Center of Aurora (TMCA). “We understand that being in the emergency room is very stressful, especially when your child is the patient. We want to assure parents that we can provide comfortable appropriate care to all children in our community.”“The TMCA ER’s Pediatric Care designation with Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children gives patients access to a wide spectrum of pediatric specialty care in Denver, including the most advanced Pediatric OR in the entire country,” said Dr. Reginald Washington, Chief Medical Officer at the Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children. “If a child is in need of a higher level of care, he or she would be transferred to the Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children Pediatric Intensive Care Unit or Inpatient Pediatric Unit. It’s one of the many benefits of being part of the larger pediatric system of care.” Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from The Medical Center of Aurora


News Article | November 17, 2016
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

BOSTON, MA, November 17, 2016-- Rosemary Farina, President of Signature Staffing Inc., has been recognized as a Distinguished Professional in her field through Women of Distinction Magazine. Rosemary Farina will be featured in an upcoming edition of Women of Distinction in 2016.As the face of her business, Rosemary Farina serves as President of Signature Staffing Inc., a very successful staffing business in Boston, Massachusetts that serves a variety of industries, to include accounting, finance, banking, healthcare, information technology, and construction, to name a few. Working with clients to help connect them with qualified employees for temporary, temp to perm, permanent, and contract positions, Farina has a strong knack for what she does."I am the rainmaker," Farina said about her boutique style business. "I am the person that sits down with the clients to discuss wants and needs; I am also the person who sits down with the candidates. I do the matching, it's my forte. It's a tough business, and very competitive, so working hard at what I do, demonstrating honesty, and practicing integrity are at the forefront of what I do. This industry isn't for everybody; you don't get and stay in this business without being excellent at what you do."When it comes to selecting candidates for clients, Farina says that it's important to be able to "read between the lines" and trust her own gut. She will only match a candidate with a client if she is absolutely confident they are a good fit. She'd rather not place anyone at all than select the wrong candidate for a position. Working behind the scenes to oversee her own finances, advertising, and all that goes along with running her business in her down time, Farina takes great pride in maintaining a business that is focused on not only honesty and integrity, but also professionalism, organization, and structure.Farina, who previously worked as an Executive Vice-President for a larger agency for six years prior to forming her own staffing business, made many executive decisions during her years there, which enabled her to learn how to trust her own instincts and become very confident in her own skillset. Learning from the bottom and working her way up helped her substantially in the long run. Years later, she was written up in the Huffington Post for her work in the staffing industry. It was a wonderful compliment that was well deserved.Additionally, while working in the staffing business, Farina had two of her own radio shows, one of which was a segment where she served as a business expert twice per week. Later offered her own show, she created Signature Style, she spoke about her own life experiences travelling domestically and internationally, and various other topics such as wine, fashion, and other popular topics of interest. She enjoyed the opportunity to speak with many esteemed guests on the show; a wonderful perk and tremendous experience for her.A philanthropist at heart, Farina is active with Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, Electronic Space Systems Corporation-Massachusetts General Hospital, and The Arrendondo Fund. She has also donated to various causes, including Boston Medical Center for One Boston Day and has made contributions to renovate Boston Medical Center's Pediatric Intensive Care Unit. Signature Staffing, Inc. was the only business to contribute to the medical center's renovation, which was later recognized on Channel 7 news. Farina is a VIP member National Association of Professional Women and Women Owned Small Business, holds certifications from System Award by government to businesses, holds a Platinum status with Dun and Bradstreet, and is a Lifetime member of Cambridge Who's Who. In her downtime, she attends a lot of charity events to remain active in her community. Farina holds a BA in Psychology from Boston University.For more information, visit www.signaturestaffing.info About Women of Distinction Magazine:Women of Distinction Magazine strives to continually bring the very best out in each article published and highlight Women of Distinction. Women of Distinction Magazine's mission is to have a platform where women can grow, inspire, empower, educate and encourage professionals from any industry by sharing stories of courage and success.Contact:Women of Distinction Magazine, Melville, NY631-465-9024


News Article | December 7, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

When it came time to blow out his candles on his 14th birthday, Estefano Reano had only one wish: a new heart. Just 40 minutes later, the Pediatric Heart Transplant team at Joe DiMaggio Children’s Hospital surprised his family with a phone call that made his wish come true making the Weston teen the hospital’s 30th heart transplant recipient. “He was playing at home, when we got the phone call telling us there was a heart for Estefano,” said Alfonso Ospino, the teen’s stepfather. “I went to my wife with phone in hand with the news and then turned around and said to our son ‘get ready there is another gift waiting for you.'” Today, he is the living legacy of a donor family who gave this pediatric heart transplant patient with a gift of a new life with his family, physicians and medical staff and in time to go home for the holidays. Emotions were high at a press conference on Tuesday at the Conine Clubhouse, located adjacent to JDCH, where Estefano and his family were reunited with the heart transplant team. They came to express their gratitude and give moving tributes and heartfelt testimonials urging the community to become organ donors. “I am so happy to be here and I am so thankful to everyone,” said Estefano. “I want to do many things like travel and I want to one day run a sanctuary for endangered animals. I thank the family for giving someone like me a second chance to live the life that I always wanted.” “I prayed and have been grateful to be able to care for my son at home with the help of these doctors,” said Roxana Fergusson, the teen’s mom – “I know there are many children who do not have that opportunity and must live and wait for their hearts in a hospital room. Most importantly we pray for the family who donated, and I thank them for giving us this gift because I know now that my son has the heart of an angel because of them.” Members of the transplant team spoke about Estefano’s condition that led to his need for a heart transplant and the technological advances that allow children to wait longer than previously possible. According to the team of doctors at JDCH, every child’s unique conditions presents a unique situation and complexity. In the case of Estefano, he was born with a structural heart condition known as single ventricle heart defect, a condition where the heart is not using all four chambers of the heart to function normally. Estefano underwent five open heart surgeries since the age of 2. While the surgeries allowed his heart to function better and sustain. The surgeries worked for a few years until he began to further grow. A few years ago, his heart began to fail and the team assessed the need to put him on the transplant list. “Estefano waited over two years for his heart,” said Maryanne R. K. Chrisant, M.D., Director, Pediatric Cardiac Transplant, Heart Failure & Cardiomyopathy at JDCH. “He and his family realize that receiving a heart transplant is a second chance for Estefano to lead a more normal life. Estefano is looking forward to returning to school, going out to play athletics and being outside with his friends. His successful course and future dreams coincide with our 30th transplant celebration.” “As a pediatric heart transplant team here at Joe DiMaggio we have had the privilege to care for 30 children and provide them with an opportunity for a new life, and that is truly an amazing and humbling feeling,” said Frank Scholl, M.D. Surgical Director of Heart Transplantation at JDCH. “At this time of this great joy, we need to remember to thank our donor families who have given the ultimate gift to another human being, we could simply not do this without them.” A video of the surgeons and nurses singing Happy Birthday inside the operating room after a successful surgery spread rapidly after it was posted on the Joe DiMaggio Children’s Hospital Facebook page. The Pediatric Heart Transplant program at JDCH opened on December 10, 2010, when approval at the federal level from UNOS (United Network for Organ Sharing) was granted. The approval of the program was the culmination of years of strategic planning, including the formation of a pediatric cardiac transplant team with the right mix of expertise and compassion. Five days after program approval, the hospital’s first pediatric heart transplant was performed by the expert cardiac transplant team. In 1992, Joe DiMaggio himself helped Memorial Healthcare System celebrate the opening of the first Joe DiMaggio Children’s Hospital. Today’s 224-bed hospital opened in 2011 and offers a safe, compassionate and nurturing environment for young patients and their families. With more than 600 board-certified physicians on staff, the hospital’s broad range of pediatric specialties includes: Heart Institute, Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, Cleft and Craniofacial Center, Cystic Fibrosis and Pulmonary Center, Emergency Department and Trauma Center, Endocrinology, General and Thoracic Surgery, Orthopedics, Pediatric Nephrology and Hypertension Program; Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Wasie Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, [U18] Sports Medicine, Outpatient Services and Inpatient/Outpatient Rehabilitation Program.


News Article | November 28, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The message on the shirt Naida Revelo wore in her first 5K run made it clear what motivated the grandmother to take on the physical challenge: “Joe D’s Saved My Grandson’s Life.” Revelo was among the more than 6,000 people who participated in the 2016 Tour de Broward, with each having their own reasons for cycling, running, or walking. A similar number is expected again in 2017, each of them united by a desire to support Joe DiMaggio Children’s Hospital, the region’s largest pediatric facility serving Broward, Palm Beach, and northern Miami-Dade counties. The same facility that has impacted many lives. “This is an opportunity for the South Florida community to assist our efforts to provide safe, high quality, cost-effective, patient and family-centered care,” said Memorial Healthcare System President & CEO Aurelio M. Fernandez, III, FACHE. “We want everyone in our community to get involved.” The event – which takes place Sunday, February 26, at Miramar Regional Park – has raised more than $2.5 million in its previous seven years for Joe DiMaggio Children's Hospital, a facility that provides care regardless of one’s ability to pay. Sponsored by ANF Group, Tour de Broward consists of 50 and 100K bicycle rides, a 5K timed run, 3K walk, and the “Power of Play Kid Zone,” a sports-themed, fun area for children 13 or younger. The 100K ride starts at 7:00 a.m., run at 8:00 am and walk at 9:00 a.m. Pre-registration and day-of registration fees range from $15-$50, depending on the event and sign-up date. Participants can register in advance at http://www.tourdebroward.com or at the park on the day of the event. Pre-registration takes place until noon Saturday, February 25. For runners and riders there is an additional fundraising commitment, however, some exceptions apply. Please refer to Event Information on the Tour de Broward website at http://www.tourdebroward.com. Due to construction at the park, all participant and volunteer parking will be held on the grounds of Memorial Hospital Miramar, 1901 SW 172 Ave., Miramar, Florida. There will be no parking permitted at the park. Shuttles will be provided. To learn about sponsorship opportunities, call (954) 265-7241. For general information about the event, call (954) 905-5633. In 1992, Joe DiMaggio himself helped Memorial Healthcare System celebrate the opening of the first Joe DiMaggio Children’s Hospital. Today’s 224-bed hospital opened in 2011 and offers a safe, compassionate and nurturing environment for young patients and their families. With more than 600 board-certified physicians on staff, the hospital’s broad range of pediatric specialties includes: Heart Institute, Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, Cleft and Craniofacial Center, Cystic Fibrosis and Pulmonary Center, Emergency Department and Trauma Center, Endocrinology, General and Thoracic Surgery, Orthopedics, Pediatric Nephrology and Hypertension Program; Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Wasie Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, [U18] Sports Medicine, Outpatient Services and Inpatient/Outpatient Rehabilitation Program.

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