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von Laer Tschudin L.,University of Lausanne | Schwitzgebel V.M.,Pediatric Endocrine and Diabetes Unit | von Scheven-Gete A.,Rhumatologie Pediatrique Romande | Hofer M.,Rhumatologie Pediatrique Romande | And 4 more authors.
Pediatric Diabetes | Year: 2015

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is rarely a component of primary immune dysregulation disorders. We report two cases in which T1D was associated with thrombocytopenia. The first patient, a 13-year-old boy, presented with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), thyroiditis, and, 3 wk later, T1D. Because of severe thrombocytopenia resistant to immunoglobulins, high-dose steroids, and cyclosporine treatment, anti-cluster of differentiation (CD20) therapy was introduced, with consequent normalization of thrombocytes and weaning off of steroids. Three and 5 months after anti-CD20 therapy, levothyroxin and insulin therapy, respectively, were stopped. Ten months after stopping insulin treatment, normal C-peptide and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels and markedly reduced anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibodies were measured. A second anti-CD20 trial for relapse of ITP was initiated 2 yr after the first trial. Anti-GAD antibody levels decreased again, but HbA1c stayed elevated and glucose monitoring showed elevated postprandial glycemia, demanding insulin therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first case in which insulin treatment could be interrupted for 28 months after anti-CD20 treatment. In patient two, thrombocytopenia followed a diagnosis of T1D 6 yr previously. Treatment with anti-CD20 led to normalization of thrombocytes, but no effect on T1D was observed. Concerning the origin of the boys' conditions, several primary immune dysregulation disorders were considered. Thrombocytopenia associated with T1D is unusual and could represent a new entity. The diabetes manifestation in patient one was probably triggered by corticosteroid treatment; regardless, anti-CD20 therapy appeared to be efficacious early in the course of T1D, but not long after the initial diagnosis of T1D, as shown for patient two. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


Toubiana J.,Assistance Publique Hopitaux de Paris AP HP | Toubiana J.,University of Paris Descartes | Toubiana J.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Toubiana J.,Pediatric Hematology Immunology Rheumatology Unit | And 45 more authors.
Blood | Year: 2016

Since their discovery in patients with autosomal dominant (AD) chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) in 2011, heterozygous STAT1 gain-of-function (GOF) mutations have increasingly been identified worldwide. The clinical spectrum associated with them needed to be delineated. We enrolled 274 patients from 167 kindreds originating from 40 countries from 5 continents. Demographic data, clinical features, immunological parameters, treatment, and outcome were recorded. The median age of the 274 patients was 22 years (range, 1-71 years); 98% of them had CMC, with a median age at onset of 1 year (range, 0-24 years). Patients often displayed bacterial (74%) infections, mostly because of Staphylococcus aureus (36%), including the respiratory tract and the skin in 47% and 28% of patients, respectively, and viral (38%) infections, mostly because of Herpesviridae (83%) and affecting the skin in 32% of patients. Invasive fungal infections (10%), mostly caused by Candida spp. (29%), and mycobacterial disease (6%) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, environmental mycobacteria, or Bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccines were less common. Many patients had autoimmune manifestations (37%), including hypothyroidism (22%), type 1 diabetes (4%), blood cytopenia (4%), and systemic lupus erythematosus (2%). Invasive infections (25%), cerebral aneurysms (6%), and cancers (6%) were the strongest predictors of poor outcome. CMC persisted in 39% of the 202 patients receiving prolonged antifungal treatment. Circulating interleukin-17A-producing T-cell count was low for most (82%) but not all of the patients tested. STAT1 GOF mutations underlie AD CMC, as well as an unexpectedly wide range of other clinical features, including not only a variety of infectious and autoimmune diseases, but also cerebral aneurysms and carcinomas that confer a poor prognosis. © 2016, American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

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