Depew, United States
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Vibration is a common phenomenon occurring in machines and equipment. Vibration is nothing but a rapid back and forth movement produced in an equipment due to oscillation of its components such as gears, belts, drive motors, bearings, and such. Although, it is unavoidable and inherent in certain machines, but a majority of the machines are designed to function absent any vibrations. In such machines, vibration monitoring aids in determining as to where the machine is on the failure curve and thus react appropriately to the same. The process of vibration monitoring depends on an assortment of precision techniques and technologies for detecting vibrations in the machine. Vibration monitoring market aids in detecting faults in the machine and also gives an indication of machine deterioration before the occurrence of other symptoms such as lubricant impurities, high electrical consumption, heat, and sound, etc. Owing to the above-stated reasons, vibration monitoring is an integral feature of the machine condition monitoring program. The global vibration monitoring systems market is anticipated to grow at a CAGR of more than 6% between 2015 and 2025 The global vibration monitoring systems market is segmented on the basis of product type, component, end-use industry, and regions. On the basis of product type, the global vibration monitoring systems market is segmented into: portable and non-portable devices The global vibration monitoring systems market is segmented on the basis of component as: proximity probe, accelerometer, and others On the basis of end-use industry, the global vibration monitoring systems market is segmented into power industry, oil and gas industry, aerospace and defense industry, food processing industry, steel industry, paper industry, chemical industry, and automotive industry etc. Region wise, the global vibration monitoring systems market is segmented as North America, Latin America, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Asia-Pacific (APEJ), Japan, and MEA The growing need to decrease plant operating cost across a number of industrial domains is one of the key factors driving the global vibration monitoring systems market. With increasing competition in the global vibration monitoring systems market, plant maintenance costs and rising energy expenditures, the demand for vibration monitoring systems is growing with a purpose of optimizing the maintenance budgets and reducing the pressure on operating expenses. Moreover, the rising capital investments in various industries such as metals, chemicals, petrochemicals, heavy equipment manufacturing, pulp, and paper, etc. is influencing a positive growth of the global vibration monitoring systems market Also, the need for avoiding the unnecessary maintenance costs and catastrophic breakdowns in varied production processes is anticipated to drive the demand of the global vibration monitoring systems market Furthermore, the introduction of advanced low-cost vibration monitoring equipment which are integrated with direct communication procedures, fast processing functions and the availability of automation software foresee tremendous growth for the market in future. Some of the key players identified in the global vibration monitoring systems market are ., Azima DLI Corporation,  Analog Devices, Emerson Electric Co., IncBruel & Kjaer Sound & Vibration Measurement A/S, Honeywell International, Inc., National Instruments Corporation, Inc., PCB Piezotronics Inc., General Electric Company, Rockwell Automation, Meggitt PLC, SKF, Data Physics Corporation, and SPM Instrument


Schiefer M.I.,Modal Shop, Inc. | Dosch J.,PCB Piezotronics Inc
20th IMEKO World Congress 2012 | Year: 2012

ICP® based accelerometers have become widely used in the field of vibration measurement as general purpose sensors. Charge mode accelerometers have historically been used as the reference for back to back comparison calibrations. This paper introduces the concept that the use of properly constructed ICP® based accelerometers result in a much simpler, more reliable and easier to use calibration system than charge mode accelerometer based systems. Historical data will be provided which documents the long term stability of selected ICP® reference sensors. This paper is relevant to anyone evaluating or assessing both secondary and primary accelerometer calibration system performance. Copyright © (2012) by the International Measurement Federation (IMEKO).


Metz B.,PCB Piezotronics Inc
27th Space Simulation Conference 2012 | Year: 2012

Exposure to the high vacuum level of a space environment induces material outgassing in ordinary accelerometers and cables. Any substance subjected to a vacuum has the potential to release trapped gasses. Contaminants from outgassing can condense onto nearby surfaces such as photo-optic devices and obscure them, rendering them useless during their intended application. During random vibration, swept sine or shock testing prior to flight, spacecraft payloads are often fitted with accelerometers in hard to reach mounting locations. As the space structure is built up around them, it can become impossible to remove the accelerometers. Sensors installed for ground vibration testing may therefore remain on the structure even if they are no longer needed for testing purposes. In any application involving a thermal vacuum environment care must be taken to select the proper accelerometers and cables prior to vibration testing. Accelerometer designs with hermetic housings and connectors can have low outgassing qualities. For all non-metallic materials outside of a hermetic package, such as cables with polymer strain relief that do not typically have low outgassing qualities, verification is required to ensure that the materials have less than or equal to 1% TML (total mass loss) and a CVCM (collected volatile condensable mass) less than or equal to 0.1%. This is verified either using NASA documentation or test results from an outside laboratory. Given these design parameters, a series of accelerometer and cable designs for the thermal vacuum environment will be discussed in this paper. They have been specifically designed or tested for low outgassing properties in accordance with the report NASA RP-1124, "Outgassing Data for Selecting Spacecraft Materials." [1].


Metz B.,PCB Piezotronics Inc. | Salzano C.,PCB Piezotronics Inc.
Advances in the Astronautical Sciences | Year: 2015

Exposure to the high vacuum level of a space environment induces material outgassing in ordinary accelerometers and cables. Any substance subjected to a vacuum has the potential to release trapped gasses. Contaminants from outgassing can condense onto nearby surfaces such as photo-optic devices and obscure them, rendering them useless during their intended application. During random vibration, swept sine or shock testing prior to flight, spacecraft payloads are often fitted with accelerometers in hard to reach mounting locations. As the space structure is built up around them, it can become impossible to remove the accelerometers. Sensors installed for ground vibration testing may therefore remain on the structure even if they are no longer needed for testing purposes. In any application involving a thermal vacuum environment care must be taken to select the proper accelerometers and cables prior to vibration testing. Accelerometer designs with hermetic housings and connectors can have low outgassing qualities. For all nonmetallic materials outside of a hermetic package, such as cables with polymer strain relief that do not typically have low outgassing qualities, verification is required to ensure that the materials have less than or equal to 1% TML (total mass loss) and a CVCM (collected volatile condensable mass) less than or equal to 0.1%. This is verified either using NASA documentation or test results from an outside laboratory. Given these design parameters, a series of accelerometer and cable designs for the thermal vacuum environment will be discussed in this paper. They have been specifically designed or tested for low outgassing properties in accordance with the report NASA RP-1124, "Outgassing Data for Selecting Spacecraft Materials".


Metz B.,PCB Piezotronics Inc
28th Space Simulation Conference - Extreme Environments: Pushing the Boundaries | Year: 2014

Due to the high cost, long development times, and uniqueness of satellites, it has become imperative to implement techniques that ensure their safety during vibration qualification testing. Force Limited Vibration is used to limit the reaction force between the shaker and unit under test. The use of piezoelectric, 3-component force sensors facilitates easy and accurate measurement of the input force. This force relates directly, using Newton's Second Law, F=ma, to the "quasi-static" acceleration of the structure's center-of-gravity.[1][5] Payloads are often fitted with piezoelectric force sensors using flight hardware or adaptor rings that present the problem of proper installation and preload required for a successful test. Preloading selection criteria is reviewed in detail along with its effects on gage sensitivity caused by bolt material effects. Case studies are presented showing 3-component piezoelectric force gages at each mounting point using flight hardware and factory supplied preload studs.


Zusman G.,PCB Piezotronics Inc.
19th International Congress on Sound and Vibration 2012, ICSV 2012 | Year: 2012

This paper introduces the new Bearing Condition Transmitter, a programmable 4-20 mA loop powered device-sensor contained in typical accelerometer housing. It is specially designed to provide early warning of typical ball/rolling element bearing faults such as cracked races, spalling, brinelling, and looseness. It has five modes of detection that are user selectable by a simple software program through a PC's USB port. The options include RMS acceleration, true PK acceleration, compensated peak (using bearing diameter and speed to normalize output), crest factor, and crest factor plus based on an original combination of the PK, RMS and crest factor for improved detection on variable speed machinery. A structure diagram of the transmitter and test results are discussed.


Lally J.,PCB Piezotronics Inc.
Sound and Vibration | Year: 2013

I read with interest the article by George Fox Lang in the August 2012 issue of Sound & Vibration about Igor Sikorsky and his early involvement with the flying boat. In the 1920s and '30s, flying boats opened up the airways for transoceanic transportation. The article sparked my interest, since I was involved as a volunteer at the Glenn Curtiss Museum with the construction, testing and documentation of a reproduction of the world's first multi-engine flying boat, the 1914 Curtiss America. In the early days of aviation, what materials were used for airframes and engines? What are their important characteristics? How can 100-year-old engines survive and fly again? What are shock and vibration concerns? What are some technological advancements that led to the development of aviation, the navy PBY, aircraft carriers and transatlantic flight? Is today's fourvalve-per-cylinder engine technology really new? When talking with visitors at the museum and engineers at tradeshows, I was surprised to learn how little was known about Glenn Curtiss, his engines and airplanes. I learned of the conflicts between the Wrights and Curtiss over issues involved with controlled flight. History has shown that advancement in virtually any area of technology usually results from building on the successes of others. Did not the dream of flight start with observations of birds in flight, then experimentation by many in development of kites, gliders, aircraft, jets, rockets and eventually trips to the moon and now Mars. Copyright © 2013 Sound and Vibration Magazine.


Patent
Pcb Piezotronics Inc. | Date: 2012-09-28

A hand-held or portable vibration sensor device having a housing and a sensor body which generally provides a single point of contact with the machinery or apparatus for which vibration measurement is desired. In one aspect, the sensor body comprises a vibration sensor element such as an accelerometer for measuring vibration. In another aspect, a force sensor such as a force sensing resistor or load cell is provided to reduce the impact of forces applied to said hand-held vibration sensor such as a force applied through a handle during measurement. In another aspect, a compensation circuit processes the out put from a vibration sensor element to provide a relatively flat frequency response over a desired operational frequency range. The hand-held vibration sensor may also comprise a rubber isolation member disposed between the sensor body and force sensor.


Patent
Pcb Piezotronics Inc. | Date: 2010-10-05

An apparatus and system for sensing vibration in rotary or reciprocating machinery, such as motors, pumps, fans, gearboxes, compressors, turbo-machinery or high-speed spindles, which comprises a mechanical isolation member (14) interposed between a sensor base (15) and a main sensor body (11). In one aspect, the mechanical isolation member comprises a coaxial cylinder of plastic, rubber or polyurethane which is compressed between the sensor base and main sensor body.


Patent
PCB Piezotronics Inc. | Date: 2013-11-05

A mechanical vibration switch having a magnet connected to a bar that rotates about an axis, an inertial mass connected to the bar, a magnetic material part disposed in a predetermined spaced apart relation from the magnet, a spring, a stop, and an electrical relay mechanically actuated by the bar. The magnetic material part is adjusted parallel to the magnet such that the magnetic force varies approximately linearly with the common surface area S between the face of the magnet and the face of the magnetic material part.

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