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Budapest, Hungary

Zentai L.,Pazmany Peter Setany
Cartographic Journal

Paper maps are generally planned for use under normal circumstances. One of the exceptions is orienteering maps, which are used in special circumstances, namely, at sport events such as running, when poor visibility and bad weather conditions may considerably reduce the legibility. When the drawing specifications of orienteering maps were created and when later new forms and disciplines of orienteering events were invented, the clear legibility of printed maps was one of the most important aspects. The International Orienteering Federation keeps the aim of preserving the characteristics of the different event and discipline formats by ensuring the legibility of the event maps. © The British Cartographic Society 2011. Source

Viragh C.,Pazmany Peter Setany | Vasarhelyi G.,Pazmany Peter Setany | Vasarhelyi G.,MTA ELTE Statistical and Biological Physics Research Group | Tarcai N.,Pazmany Peter Setany | And 7 more authors.
Bioinspiration and Biomimetics

Animal swarms displaying a variety of typical flocking patterns would not exist without the underlying safe, optimal and stable dynamics of the individuals. The emergence of these universal patterns can be efficiently reconstructed with agent-based models. If we want to reproduce these patterns with artificial systems, such as autonomous aerial robots, agent-based models can also be used in their control algorithms. However, finding the proper algorithms and thus understanding the essential characteristics of the emergent collective behaviour requires thorough and realistic modeling of the robot and also the environment. In this paper, we first present an abstract mathematical model of an autonomous flying robot. The model takes into account several realistic features, such as time delay and locality of communication, inaccuracy of the on-board sensors and inertial effects. We present two decentralized control algorithms. One is based on a simple self-propelled flocking model of animal collective motion, the other is a collective target tracking algorithm. Both algorithms contain a viscous friction-like term, which aligns the velocities of neighbouring agents parallel to each other. We show that this term can be essential for reducing the inherent instabilities of such a noisy and delayed realistic system. We discuss simulation results on the stability of the control algorithms, and perform real experiments to show the applicability of the algorithms on a group of autonomous quadcopters. In our case, bio-inspiration works in two ways. On the one hand, the whole idea of trying to build and control a swarm of robots comes from the observation that birds tend to flock to optimize their behaviour as a group. On the other hand, by using a realistic simulation framework and studying the group behaviour of autonomous robots we can learn about the major factors influencing the flight of bird flocks. © 2014 IOP Publishing Ltd. Source

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