Programs PATH Research Institute

Hamilton, Canada

Programs PATH Research Institute

Hamilton, Canada
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Von Keyserlingk C.,Programs PATH Research Institute | Boutis K.,King's College | Boutis K.,University of Toronto | Willan A.R.,University of Toronto | And 4 more authors.
International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care | Year: 2011

Objectives: In a practice setting where casting is considered the standard of care, the aim of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of wrist splints compared with routine casting in children with acceptably angulated distal radius greenstick or transverse fractures. Methods: A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted alongside a randomized controlled trial (RCT). One hundred children with acceptably angulated distal radius greenstick or transverse fractures received either a wrist splint or cast. Information on health care provider and patient and family resource use as well as productivity cost was collected. Resource use was costed using unit costs from local administrative data sources and expense diaries. Effectiveness was assessed at 6 weeks using the performance version of the Activities Scale for Kids (ASKp) questionnaire. Cost-effectiveness analysis related differential costs to differential ASKp scores. Results: Mean total cost was $877.58 in the splint group and $950.35 in the cast group, with a mean difference of $-72.76 (standard error [SE] 45.88). Mean total healthcare cost was $670.66 in the splint group and $768.22 in the cast group, with a mean difference of $-97.56 (SE 9.24). Mean (SE) ASKp was 92.8 in the splint group and 91.4 in the cast group, with a mean difference of 1.439 (SE 1.585). Therefore, splint management was more effective and cheaper. After accounting for uncertainty, the probability of splint being cost-effective compared with cast was 94 percent for a willingness-to-pay threshold value of $0 for one-unit gain in ASKp score and exceeded 82 percent for all threshold values. Conclusions: In this RCT, splint management was cost-effective compared with casting in children with acceptably angulated distal radius greenstick or transverse fractures. This study challenges the existing standard of care for children with this type of fracture and provides justification on clinical and economic grounds for a change in routine practice. © 2011 Cambridge University Press.


PubMed | Programs PATH Research Institute
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: International journal of technology assessment in health care | Year: 2011

In a practice setting where casting is considered the standard of care, the aim of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of wrist splints compared with routine casting in children with acceptably angulated distal radius greenstick or transverse fractures.A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted alongside a randomized controlled trial (RCT). One hundred children with acceptably angulated distal radius greenstick or transverse fractures received either a wrist splint or cast. Information on health care provider and patient and family resource use as well as productivity cost was collected. Resource use was costed using unit costs from local administrative data sources and expense diaries. Effectiveness was assessed at 6 weeks using the performance version of the Activities Scale for Kids (ASKp) questionnaire. Cost-effectiveness analysis related differential costs to differential ASKp scores.Mean total cost was $877.58 in the splint group and $950.35 in the cast group, with a mean difference of $-72.76 (standard error [SE] 45.88). Mean total healthcare cost was $670.66 in the splint group and $768.22 in the cast group, with a mean difference of $-97.56 (SE 9.24). Mean (SE) ASKp was 92.8 in the splint group and 91.4 in the cast group, with a mean difference of 1.439 (SE 1.585). Therefore, splint management was more effective and cheaper. After accounting for uncertainty, the probability of splint being cost-effective compared with cast was 94 percent for a willingness-to-pay threshold value of $0 for one-unit gain in ASKp score and exceeded 82 percent for all threshold values.In this RCT, splint management was cost-effective compared with casting in children with acceptably angulated distal radius greenstick or transverse fractures. This study challenges the existing standard of care for children with this type of fracture and provides justification on clinical and economic grounds for a change in routine practice.

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