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Tremblay M.S.,Eastern Research Group | Tremblay M.S.,University of Ottawa | Gray C.,Eastern Research Group | Babcock S.,KidActive | And 16 more authors.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health | Year: 2015

A diverse, cross-sectorial group of partners, stakeholders and researchers, collaborated to develop an evidence-informed Position Statement on active outdoor play for children aged 3–12 years. The Position Statement was created in response to practitioner, academic, legal, insurance and public debate, dialogue and disagreement on the relative benefits and harms of active (including risky) outdoor play. The Position Statement development process was informed by two systematic reviews, a critical appraisal of the current literature and existing position statements, engagement of research experts (N = 9) and cross-sectorial individuals/organizations (N = 17), and an extensive stakeholder consultation process (N = 1908). More than 95% of the stakeholders consulted strongly agreed or somewhat agreed with the Position Statement; 14/17 participating individuals/organizations endorsed it; and over 1000 additional individuals and organizations requested their name be listed as a supporter. The final Position Statement on Active Outdoor Play states: “Access to active play in nature and outdoors—with its risks— is essential for healthy child development. We recommend increasing children’s opportunities for self-directed play outdoors in all settings—at home, at school, in child care, the community and nature.” The full Position Statement provides context for the statement, evidence supporting it, and a series of recommendations to increase active outdoor play opportunities to promote healthy child development. © 2015 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Source


Tremblay M.S.,University of Ottawa | Warburton D.E.R.,University of British Columbia | Janssen I.,Queens University | Paterson D.H.,University of Western Ontario | And 8 more authors.
Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism | Year: 2011

The Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology (CSEP), in cooperation with ParticipACTION and other stakeholders, and with support from the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), has developed the new Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines for Children (aged 5-11 years), Youth (aged 12-17 years), Adults (aged 18-64 years), and Older Adults (aged ≥ 65 years). The new guidelines include a preamble to provide context and specific guidelines for each age group. The entire guideline development process was guided by the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument, which is the international standard for clinical practice guideline development. Thus, the guidelines have gone through a rigorous and transparent developmental process; we based the recommendations herein on evidence from 3 systematic reviews, and the final guidelines benefitted from an extensive online and in-person consultation process with hundreds of stakeholders and key informants, both domestic and international. Since 2006, the products of our efforts resulted in the completion of 21 peer-reviewed journal articles (including 5 systematic reviews) that collectively guided this work. The process that Canadian researchers undertook to update the national physical activity guidelines represents the most current synthesis, interpretation, and application of the scientific evidence to date. Source


Barnes J.D.,Eastern Research Group | Colley R.C.,Eastern Research Group | Borghese M.,Eastern Research Group | Janson K.,ParticiPACTION | Tremblay M.S.,Eastern Research Group
Paediatrics and Child Health (Canada) | Year: 2013

The present article summarizes the results from the Active Healthy Kids Canada 2012 Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth. The Report Card assessed the physical activity levels of Canadian children and youth nationally, and the initiatives of public and nongovernment sectors to promote and facilitate physical activity opportunities for children and youth in Canada. Based on a comprehensive collection of data that were analyzed and/or published in 2011, 24 indicators relating to physical activity were graded. The Physical Activity Levels indicator, the core indicator of the Report Card, was graded an 'F' for the sixth consecutive year. Although the majority of grades remained unchanged from the previous year, four grades improved and two worsened. These results suggest that few Canadian children and youth have sufficient physical activity levels, and that greater efforts are required across sectors to promote and facilitate physical activity opportunities for children and youth in Canada. ©2013 Pulsus Group Inc. All rights reserved. Source


Tremblay M.S.,University of Ottawa | LeBlanc A.G.,University of Ottawa | Janssen I.,Queens University | Kho M.E.,Johns Hopkins University | And 4 more authors.
Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism | Year: 2011

The Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology (CSEP), in partnership with the Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group (HALO) at the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, and in collaboration with ParticipACTION, and others, has developed the Canadian Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines for Children (aged 5-11 years) and Youth (aged 12-17 years). The guidelines include a preamble to provide context, followed by the specific recommendations for sedentary behaviour. The entire development process was guided by the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument, which is the international standard for clinical practice guideline development. Thus, the guidelines have gone through a rigorous and transparent developmental process and the recommendations are based on evidence from a systematic review and interpretation of the research evidence. The final guidelines benefitted from an extensive online consultation process with 230 domestic and international stakeholders and key informants. The final guideline recommendations state that for health benefits, children (aged 5-11 years) and youth (aged 12-17 years) should minimize the time that they spend being sedentary each day. This may be achieved by (i) limiting recreational screen time to no more than 2 h per day - lower levels are associated with additional health benefits; and (ii) limiting sedentary (motorized) transport, extended sitting time, and time spent indoors throughout the day. These are the first evidence-based Canadian Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines for Children and Youth and provide important and timely recommendations for the advancement of public health based on a systematic synthesis, interpretation, and application of the current scientific evidence. Source


Tremblay M.S.,University of Ottawa | Warburton D.E.R.,University of British Columbia | Janssen I.,Queens University | Paterson D.H.,University of Western Ontario | And 8 more authors.
Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism | Year: 2011

The Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology (CSEP), in cooperation with ParticipACTION and other stakeholders, and with support from the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), has developed the new Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines for Children (aged 5-11 years), Youth (aged 12-17 years), Adults (aged 18-64 years), and Older Adults (aged ≥ 65 years). The new guidelines include a preamble to provide context and specific guidelines for each age group. The entire guideline development process was guided by the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument, which is the international standard for clinical practice guideline development. Thus, the guidelines have gone through a rigorous and transparent developmental process; we based the recommendations herein on evidence from 3 systematic reviews, and the final guidelines benefitted from an extensive online and in-person consultation process with hundreds of stakeholders and key informants, both domestic and international. Since 2006, the products of our efforts resulted in the completion of 21 peer-reviewed journal articles (including 5 systematic reviews) that collectively guided this work. The process that Canadian researchers undertook to update the national physical activity guidelines represents the most current synthesis, interpretation, and application of the scientific evidence to date. Source

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