Baltimore, MD, United States
Baltimore, MD, United States

Time filter

Source Type

Miller M.S.,Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences | Miller M.S.,Johns Hopkins University | Schmidt-Kittler O.,Johns Hopkins University | Schmidt-Kittler O.,Sanofi S.A. | And 14 more authors.
Oncotarget | Year: 2014

We report two crystal structures of the wild-type phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase a (PI3Kα) heterodimer refined to 2.9 Å and 3.4 Å resolution: the first as the free enzyme, the second in complex with the lipid substrate, diC4-PIP2, respectively. The first structure shows key interactions of the N-terminal SH2 domain (nSH2) and iSH2 with the activation loop that suggest a mechanism by which the enzyme is inhibited in its basal state. In the second structure, the lipid substrate binds in a positively charged pocket adjacent to the ATP-binding site, bordered by the P-loop, the activation loop and the iSH2 domain. An additional lipid-binding site was identified at the interface of the ABD, iSH2 and kinase domains. The ability of PI3Kα to bind an additional PIP2 molecule was confirmed in vitro by fluorescence quenching experiments. The crystal structures reveal key differences in the way the nSH2 domain interacts with wild-type p110a and with the oncogenic mutant p110aH1047R. Increased buried surface area and two unique salt-bridges observed only in the wild-type structure suggest tighter inhibition in the wild-type PI3Kα than in the oncogenic mutant. These differences may be partially responsible for the increased basal lipid kinase activity and increased membrane binding of the oncogenic mutant.


Berry A.A.,University of Maryland Baltimore County | Yang Y.,Imperial College London | Pakharukova N.,University of Turku | Garnett J.A.,Imperial College London | And 13 more authors.
PLoS Pathogens | Year: 2014

Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is a leading cause of acute and persistent diarrhea worldwide. A recently emerged Shiga-toxin-producing strain of EAEC resulted in significant mortality and morbidity due to progressive development of hemolytic-uremic syndrome. The attachment of EAEC to the human intestinal mucosa is mediated by aggregative adherence fimbria (AAF). Using X-ray crystallography and NMR structures, we present new atomic resolution insight into the structure of AAF variant I from the strain that caused the deadly outbreak in Germany in 2011, and AAF variant II from archetype strain 042, and propose a mechanism for AAF-mediated adhesion and biofilm formation. Our work shows that major subunits of AAF assemble into linear polymers by donor strand complementation where a single minor subunit is inserted at the tip of the polymer by accepting the donor strand from the terminal major subunit. Whereas the minor subunits of AAF have a distinct conserved structure, AAF major subunits display large structural differences, affecting the overall pilus architecture. These structures suggest a mechanism for AAF-mediated adhesion and biofilm formation. Binding experiments using wild type and mutant subunits (NMR and SPR) and bacteria (ELISA) revealed that despite the structural differences AAF recognize a common receptor, fibronectin, by employing clusters of basic residues at the junction between subunits in the pilus. We show that AAF-fibronectin attachment is based primarily on electrostatic interactions, a mechanism not reported previously for bacterial adhesion to biotic surfaces. © 2014 Berry et al.


PubMed | University of Turku, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Paragon Bioservices, Imperial College London and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PLoS pathogens | Year: 2014

Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is a leading cause of acute and persistent diarrhea worldwide. A recently emerged Shiga-toxin-producing strain of EAEC resulted in significant mortality and morbidity due to progressive development of hemolytic-uremic syndrome. The attachment of EAEC to the human intestinal mucosa is mediated by aggregative adherence fimbria (AAF). Using X-ray crystallography and NMR structures, we present new atomic resolution insight into the structure of AAF variant I from the strain that caused the deadly outbreak in Germany in 2011, and AAF variant II from archetype strain 042, and propose a mechanism for AAF-mediated adhesion and biofilm formation. Our work shows that major subunits of AAF assemble into linear polymers by donor strand complementation where a single minor subunit is inserted at the tip of the polymer by accepting the donor strand from the terminal major subunit. Whereas the minor subunits of AAF have a distinct conserved structure, AAF major subunits display large structural differences, affecting the overall pilus architecture. These structures suggest a mechanism for AAF-mediated adhesion and biofilm formation. Binding experiments using wild type and mutant subunits (NMR and SPR) and bacteria (ELISA) revealed that despite the structural differences AAF recognize a common receptor, fibronectin, by employing clusters of basic residues at the junction between subunits in the pilus. We show that AAF-fibronectin attachment is based primarily on electrostatic interactions, a mechanism not reported previously for bacterial adhesion to biotic surfaces.


Matsumoto N.M.,University of California at Los Angeles | Buchman G.W.,Paragon Bioservices | Rome L.H.,University of California at Los Angeles | Maynard H.D.,University of California at Los Angeles
European Polymer Journal | Year: 2015

Abstract Multiply responsive protein nanoparticles are interesting for a variety of applications. Herein, we describe the synthesis of a vault nanoparticle that responds to both temperature and pH. Specifically, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) with a pyridyl disulfide end group was prepared by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The polymer had a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of 31.9 °C at pH 5, 44.0 °C at pH 6 and above 60 °C at pH 7. The polymer was conjugated to human major vault protein (hMVP), and the resulting nanoparticle was analyzed by UV-Vis, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and electron microscopy. The data demonstrated that the poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid)-vault conjugate did not respond to temperatures below 60 °C at pH 7, while the nanoparticles reversibly aggregated at pH 6. Furthermore, it was shown that the vault nanoparticle structure remained intact for at least three heat and cooling cycles. Thus, these dually responsive nanoparticles may serve as a platform for drug delivery and other applications. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | University of California at Los Angeles and Paragon Bioservices
Type: | Journal: European polymer journal | Year: 2015

Multiply responsive protein nanoparticles are interesting for a variety of applications. Herein, we describe the synthesis of a vault nanoparticle that responds to both temperature and pH. Specifically, poly(


Simon R.,University of Maryland, Baltimore | Curtis B.,University of Maryland, Baltimore | Deumic V.,Paragon Bioservices | Nicki J.,Paragon Bioservices | And 6 more authors.
Protein Expression and Purification | Year: 2014

Flagellins are the main structural proteins of bacterial flagella and potent stimulators of innate and adaptive immunity in mammals. The flagellins of Salmonella are virulence factors and protective antigens, and form the basis of promising vaccines. Despite broad interest in flagellins as antigens and adjuvants in vaccine formulations, there have been few advances towards the development of scalable and economical purification methods for these proteins. We report here a simple and robust strategy to purify flagellin monomers from the supernatants of liquid growth culture. Phase 1 flagellins from Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium (i epitope) and Enteritidis (g,m epitopes) were purified directly from conditioned fermentation growth media using sequential cation- and anion-exchange chromatography coupled with a final tangential flow-filtration step. Conventional porous chromatography resin was markedly less efficient than membrane chromatography for flagellin purification. Recovery after each process step was robust, with endotoxin, nucleic acid and residual host-cell protein effectively removed. The final yield was 200-300 mg/L fermentation culture supernatant, with ∼45-50% overall recovery. A final pH 2 treatment step was instituted to ensure uniformity of flagellin in the monomeric form. Flagellins purified by this method were recognized by monoclonal anti-flagellin antibodies and maintained capacity to activate Toll-like Receptor 5. The process described is simple, readily scalable, uses standard bioprocess methods, and requires only a few steps to obtain highly purified material. © 2014 Published by Elsevier Inc.


Paragon Bioservices | Entity website

Please click on the links below to view Paragon Bioservices press releases by year:


BALTIMORE, Nov. 18, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Paragon Bioservices, Inc., a global leader in the manufacturing of biopharmaceuticals and vaccines, announced today the appointment of Ruby Hofmann to the position of Vice President, Human Resources and Organizational Development, where she will...


News Article | November 22, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.com

BALTIMORE, Nov. 22, 2016 /PRNewswire/ --  A global leader in the manufacturing of biopharmaceuticals, vaccines, and viral vectors announced today the appointment of John Conner to the position of Senior Vice President of GMP Manufacturing. "We are building a world class GMP team to co...

Loading Paragon Bioservices collaborators
Loading Paragon Bioservices collaborators