Ymittos Athens, Greece
Ymittos Athens, Greece

The Panteion University of Social and Political science , usually referred to simply as the Panteion University, is a university located in Athens, Greece. Founded in 1927, it is among the three oldest universities of political science in Europe. Wikipedia.


Time filter

Source Type

Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: SSH.2013.6.3-1 | Award Amount: 1.66M | Year: 2014

MYWeB takes a balanced approach to assessing the feasibility of a European Longitudinal Study for Children and Young People (ELSCYP) through prioritising both scientific and policy imperatives. Striking the appropriate balance between science and policy is guaranteed through the use of an evaluation/appraisal methodology which ensures that the outcomes will be methodologically robust, technically feasible and will represent value for money. A full scale pilot study in six countries means original empirical data on field experiences will provide direct evidence of the feasibility of an ELSCYP. Engagement with a wide range of stakeholders including policy-makers at a European, Member State and regional level ensures that the project outcomes take into account the broadest range of policy makers. Questions about the value added that a longitudinal survey can offer over a cross-sectional survey will, therefore, be fully informed by policy agendas. Children and Young People are integrated into the project plan to contribute to the operationalisation of notions of well-being as well as in understanding the best modes of conducting an ELSCYP. The MYWeB consortium contains researchers from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds and provides expertise in the areas of children and young peoples well-being, childhood care; education; the environment in which a child grows up, childhood/youth work and leisure and participation. In addition, all teams are experienced in undertaking questionnaire survey research. Each Delivery Partner and Collaborator in the consortium is part of the FP7 funded MYPLACE project and have direct experience of working with one another on a large and complex project and the requirements to deliver to contract. The consortium contains a team with international repute in the methodology of longitudinal surveys ensuring that the project outcomes are informed by cutting edge scientists working in this field of methodology.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: SSH-2010-5.1-1 | Award Amount: 9.97M | Year: 2011

MYPLACE explores how young peoples social participation is shaped by the shadows (past, present and future) of totalitarianism and populism in Europe. Conceptually, it goes beyond the comparison of discrete national political cultures or reified classifications of political heritage (postcommunist/liberal democratic); it is premised rather on the pan-European nature of a range of radical and populist political and philosophical traditions and the cyclical rather than novel nature of the popularity they currently enjoy. Empirically, MYPLACE employs a combination of survey, interview and ethnographic research instruments to provide new, pan- European data that not only measure levels of participation but capture the meanings young people attach to it. Analytically, through its specific focus on youth and the historical and cultural contextualization of young peoples social participation, MYPLACE replaces the routine, and often abstract, iteration of the reasons for young peoples disengagement from politics with an empirically rich mapping of young peoples understandings of the civic and political space that they inhabit. In policy terms, MYPLACE identifies the obstacles to, and facilitators of, young peoples reclamation of the European political arena as a place for them.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SSH.2013.5.1-1 | Award Amount: 3.09M | Year: 2014

Since 2008, Europe has been shaken by an ongoing crisis. If relevant parts of populations are exposed to socioeconomic risks, it is a distinctive characteristic of European political ethics that they must not be left alone, but should be subject to support and solidarity by budget support policy, economic development policies and social policy at different levels. But, in analogy with medical and psychological findings, some parts of the vulnerable population, although experiencing the same living conditions as others, are developing resilience, which in our context means that they perform social, economic and cultural practices and habits which protect them from suffer and harm and support sustainable patterns of coping and adaption. This resilience to socioeconomic crises at household levels is the focus of the proposed project. It can consist of identity patterns, knowledge, family or community relations, cultural and social as well as economic practices, be they formal or informal. Welfare states, labour markets and economic policies at both macro or meso level form the context or environment of those resilience patterns. For reasons of coping with the crisis without leaving the common ground of the implicit European social model (or the unwritten confession to the welfare state) under extremely bad monetary conditions in many countries, and for reasons of maintaining quality of life and improving social policy, it is a highly interesting perspective to learn from emergent processes of resilience development and their preconditions. Thus, the main questions are directed at understanding patterns and dimensions of resilience at micro-/household level in different types of European member and neighbour states accounting for regional varieties, relevant internal and external conditions and resources as well as influences on these patterns by social, economic or labour market policy as well as legal regulations.


Theofilou P.,Panteion University
International Urology and Nephrology | Year: 2012

Background and objective Patients' beliefs regarding their health are important to understand responses to chronic disease. The present study aimed to determine (i) whether beliefs about health differ between different renal replacement therapies in endstage renal disease (ESRD) patients and (ii) whether these beliefs are associated with health-related quality of life (HQoL), as well as with mental health. Methods A sample of 89 ESRD patients, 41 on hemodialysis (HD) treatment and 48 on peritoneal dialysis (PD) treatment, completed the World Health Organization Quality of Life instrument, the General Health Questionnaire, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, and the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control. Results Regarding differences in health beliefs between the two groups, HD patients focused more on the dimension of internal health locus of control than PD patients. This dimension was associated with better QoL (P =<0.01) and general health (P = 0.03) in the total sample. On the contrary, the dimension of important others in health locus of control was associated with higher depression (P = 0.02). Conclusions The beliefs that dialysis patients hold about their illness appear to be related to the type of renal replacement therapy. These cognitions are associated with HQoL and with mental health. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, B.V.


Theofilou P.,Panteion University
International Journal of Behavioral Medicine | Year: 2013

Background: Several studies have shown that non-adherence is a common and increasing problem among individuals with chronic illnesses, including hemodialysis patients. Purpose: The present study aimed to investigate the influence of depression and health cognitions on medication adherence among patients undergoing hemodialysis. Method: A sample of 168 participants was recruited from six general hospitals in the broader area of Athens, consisting of patients undergoing in-center hemodialysis. Measurements were conducted with the following instruments: the Medication Adherence Rating Scale, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), and the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control (MHLC) scale. Results: The results indicated that medication adherence was associated positively with the dimensions of internal and doctor-attributed health locus of control, measured by the MHLC. It was also related negatively to depression, measured by the CES-D. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates the importance of depression in understanding the medication adherence of hemodialysis patients, as well as the contribution of heath cognitions. © 2012 International Society of Behavioral Medicine.


Economou C.,Panteion University
Health systems in transition | Year: 2010

The Health Systems in Transition (HiT) profiles are country-based reports that provide a detailed description of a health system and of policy initiatives in progress or under development. HiTs examine different approaches to the organization, financing and delivery of health services and the role of the main actors in health systems; describe the institutional framework, process, content and implementation of health and health care policies; and highlight challenges and areas that require more in-depth analysis. The health status of the Greek population has strongly improved over the last few decades and seems to compare relatively favourably with other OECD and European Union (EU) countries. The health system is a mixture of public integrated, public contract and public reimbursement models, comprising elements from both the public and private sectors and incorporating principles of different organizational patterns. Access to services is based on citizenship as well as on occupational status.The system is financed by the state budget, social insurance contributions and private payments.The largest share of health expenditure constitutes private expenditure, mainly in the form of out of pocket payments which is also the element contributing most to the overall increase in health expenditure. The delivery of health care services is based on both public and private providers. The presence of private providers is more obvious in primary care,especially in diagnostic technologies, private physicians' practices and pharmaceuticals. Despite success in improving the health of the population, the Greek health care system faces serious structural problems concerning the organization, financing and delivery of services. It suffers from the absence of cost-containment measures and defined criteria for funding, resulting in sickness funds experiencing economic constraints and budget deficits. The high percentage of private expenditure goes against the principle of fair financing and equity in access to health care services. Efficiency is in question due to the lack of incentives to improve performance in the public sector. Mechanisms for needs assessment and priority-setting are underdeveloped and, as a consequence, the regional distribution of health resources is unequal. Centralization of the system is coupled with a lack of planning and coordination, and limited managerial and administrative capacity. In addition, the oversupply of physicians, the absence of a referral system, and irrational pricing and reimbursement policies are factors encouraging under-the-table payments and the black economy. These shortcomings result in low satisfaction with the health care system expressed by citizens. The landmark in the development of the Greek health care system was the creation of the national health system (ESY) in 1983. This report describes the development of the ESY at the structural level and generally, the process of implementing reforms. The strategic targets of health reform initiatives have been to structure a unified health care sector along the lines of the original ESY proposal and to cope with current inefficiencies. However, the three reforms attempted in the 1990s were never fully implemented, while the ambitious reform project of the period 2000-2004, which provided for the regionalization of the system, new management structures, prospective reimbursement, new employment conditions for hospital doctors, modernization of public health services and reorganization of primary health care, was abolished after the elections of 2004 and a change in government. While the new strategy, launched in 2005 with the stated aims of securing the financial viability of the health care system in the short term and its sustainability in the long term, addressed specific weaknesses, it has been rather controversial: the introduction of a centralized administrative public procurement system, the development of public-private partnerships (PPPs) for the construction of public hospitals and the reform of pharmaceutical care have been accompanied by the abolition of professional hospital management and its replacement by political administration. The dominance of clientelism and party thinking instead of consensus-building has resulted in a health policy that lacks continuity and the ability to bring about change. World Health Organization 2010, on behalf of the European Observatory on health systems and Policies.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SSH.2012.1.3-2 | Award Amount: 3.09M | Year: 2013

The INSPIRES project aims to contribute to resilient and inclusive labour markets in Europe. It comparatively assesses the resilience and inclusiveness of labour markets in European countries, it identifies innovative policies that have contributed to resilience and inclusiveness and it analyzes strategies of policy learning that facilitate the development and transfer of these innovations within and across European nation states. In order to do so, it analyzes in-depth the evolution of labour markets policies, employment policies and social policies. Moreover, it qualitatively and quantitatively assesses the labour market position of vulnerable groups from 2000 onwards. INSPIRES covers eleven countries from all European welfare traditions: Mediterranean, Eastern-European, Anglo-Saxon, Scandinavian and the continental regimes. The consortium consists of a multidisciplinary team of leading European scholars that focus on the labour market, employment issues and social policies. The INSPIRES project aims to accumulate practice-oriented knowledge on the factors that positively and negatively affect resilience and inclusiveness. It seeks to explain differences within and between countries, and within and between the labour market positions of different vulnerable groups on the labour market. INSPIRES intends to isolate the impact of national policies from the structural demographic, social and economic characteristics on labour market resilience. Building upon this analysis, it tries to identify processes of policy learning and innovation that occur in the interactions between policy makers, politicians, non-profit organizations, trade unions, business associations and other stakeholders at the European, national and regional level. The outcomes of INSPIRES contribute to facilitating policy learning and innovation processes across territorial and sectoral boundaries and to the creation of inclusive and resilient labour markets in European countries.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IEF | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-IEF | Award Amount: 215.70K | Year: 2013

This study aims to examine the social legacies of the Olympic Games and other sporting mega events in Greece and more specifically focuses on the impacts and legacies that such events can have on social capital as an important aspect in maintaining a productive and lively society. Roche (1994, p. 1) describes mega events as short-term events with long-term consequences. This description points clearly to the economic as well as political, social and cultural motives that persuade cities and countries to bid for the hosting of events such as the Olympic Games. One of the problems of evaluating legacy impacts across a range of dimensions (e.g. social, cultural, health, environmental and economic) is that there is an inevitable pressure to convert these dimensions into a single economic and tangible measure to facilitate the evaluation of performance. However, defining legacy is problematic especially if conceived as an entirely predictable or measurable set of objectives. Studies on the social impacts and mega events are very limited, while research evidence on mega events and the social impacts in relation to certain activities (such as volunteering) or marginal social groups (such as immigrants) has been even rarer. Especially the impact of sporting mega events in enhancing social capital (e.g. through the development of a sense of place and community pride) is largely unresearched. This project aims to address this absence in the relevant literature and to provide further knowledge through rigorous theory-informed research and scholarship. There are two major research questions: 1) What are the impacts of sporting mega events on social capital? (Positive or negative)/ do they generate short-term or long-term legacies? 2) How sporting mega events affect the social capital of specific groups? a) How volunteering affects individuals? b) To what extent sporting mega events have an impact on the social capital of marginal populations such as immigrants?


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SSH-2009-5.2.3. | Award Amount: 1.82M | Year: 2010

The project will explore two interrelated sociocultural dynamics that impactthe future of European integration and have a profound effect on the development of a common European culture by challenging established ethnic, class, linguistic and gendered divisions. These are: a.the rise in migrant mobility and the establishment of transnational migrant networks that enable the construction and negotiation of new forms of hybrid identity and a sense of multiple belonging based on the experiences of cultural diversity and intercultural communication, and b. thespread of transnational digital networks that transcend state boundaries and exclusive national identities and give users the potential to participate directly in processes of cultural production, exchange and consumption particularly through the use of new media technologies. More specifically the project will address the question of participation of migrant individuals and groups in transnational digital networks by employing innovative methodologies combining online and offline research. Emphasis will be placed on the ability of migrants to access and produce diverse digital spaces and use them to promote their own needs and demands, but also in the possibilitiesfor the promotion of intercultural dialogue and cooperationthat open through the development of new interactive media. Gender will be mainstreamed and treated as an integral aspect of the research design and analysis throughout the project. In particular, the project will explore theways in which changing gender power relations shape identities and performativities in transnational digital and migrant networks. In order to disseminate information and put the findings of the research into practice, the project will develop a transnational migrant digital platform and an interactive digital game.


Recent years have seen a relative flourishing in the Greek countryside of small women's businesses engaged in the production of local traditional agrofood products for an emerging consumer demand for foods of specific quality. In the present article the central research question may be summarized as: " to what extent do these women perceive their business more as a means of supplementing family income than as a point of departure for a personal professional career?" We argue that women as entrepreneurs probably adhere to different behavioural patterns from men and have different expectations in the sense that they attach more importance to maintaining equilibrium between the requirements of profession and the demands of family life than they do to achieving economically rational goals through business success.The findings of the empirical research carried out in the Peloponnese (2006-2007) indicated that these were small individual businesses utilizing local resources (farm production, traditional recipes, family labour). The women started up their businesses making use of tacit knowledge and know-how, with the small and flexible scale of the production and the family character of the business minimizing entrepreneurial risk. These are dynamic and often innovative businesses with a capacity to adapt to the demands of the consumer market. © 2009.

Loading Panteion University collaborators
Loading Panteion University collaborators