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Scottsbluff, NE, United States

Baenziger P.S.,Dep. of Agronomy and Horticulture | Graybosch R.A.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Nelson L.A.,Dep. of Agronomy and Horticulture | Regassa T.,Dep. of Agronomy and Horticulture | And 14 more authors.
Journal of Plant Registrations | Year: 2011

'NH03614 CL' (Reg. No. CV-1051, PI 653833) hard red winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was developed cooperatively by the Nebraska Agricultural Experiment Station and the USDA-ARS and released in 2008 by the developing institutions and the South Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station and the Wyoming Agricultural Experiment Station. In addition to researchers at the releasing institutions, USDA-ARS researchers at Manhattan, KS and St. Paul, MN participated in the development of NH03614 CL. NH03614 CL was selected from the cross 'Wesley' sib//'Millennium' sib/'Above' sib that was made in the spring of 1997 to develop new herbicide-tolerant cultivars. NH03614 CL was selected using the bulk breeding method as an F3:4 line (F3-derived line in the F4 generation) in 2001, and in 2003 was assigned experimental line number NH03164. NH03614 CL was released primarily for its herbicide tolerance to imadazolinone compounds which control many previously difficult-to-control weeds in wheat production systems, and for its superior adaptation to rainfed wheat production systems in Nebraska, Wyoming, South Dakota, and counties in adjacent states. © Crop Science Society of America.


Baenziger P.S.,Dep. of Agronomy and Horticulture | Graybosch R.A.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Regassa T.,Dep. of Agronomy and Horticulture | Nelson L.A.,Dep. of Agronomy and Horticulture | And 9 more authors.
Journal of Plant Registrations | Year: 2011

'NE01481' (Reg. No. CV-1061, PI 659689) hard red winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was developed cooperatively by the Nebraska Agricultural Experiment Station and the USDA-ARS and released in April 2010. NE01481 will be marketed as Husker Genetics brand McGill. In addition to superior agronomic performance, Nebraska wheat growers would like to have increased resistance to Wheat soilborne mosaic virus. NE01481 was selected from the cross NE92458/'Ike' that was made in 1995. The pedigree of NE92458 is OK83201/'Redland' and the pedigree of OK83201, an experimental line developed by Oklahoma State University is 'Vona'//'Chisholm'/'Plainsman V'. NE01481 was selected with the bulk- breeding method as an F3:4 line in 1999, and in 2001 it was assigned experimental line number NE01481. NE01481 was released because of its superior grain yield in rainfed wheat production systems in southeastern, south central, and southwestern Nebraska and that it is the first modern release from our program with resistance to Wheat soilborne mosaic virus. © Crop Science Society of America.


Baenziger P.S.,University of Nebraska - Lincoln | Graybosch R.A.,University of Nebraska - Lincoln | Regassa T.,University of Nebraska - Lincoln | Klein R.N.,West Central Research and Extension Center | And 12 more authors.
Journal of Plant Registrations | Year: 2014

Providing more productive wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars with broad adaptation in their target regions to wheat producers is a major goal of wheat-breeding programs. 'NE06545' (Reg. No. CV-1098, PI 667038) hard red winter wheat was developed cooperatively by the Nebraska Agricultural Experiment Station and the USDA-ARS and released in 2013 by the developing institutions. NE06545 was released primarily for its superior performance under rainfed conditions in Nebraska and adjacent areas of the Great Plains. NE06545 was selected from the cross KS92-946-B-15-1/'Alliance', where the pedigree of KS92-946-B-15-1 is ABI86*3414/'Jagger'//'Karl 92'. That cross was made in 2000. NE06545 was selected using a modified bulk breeding method as an F3:4 line (F3-derived line in the F4 generation) in 2004, and in 2006 it was assigned experimental line number NE06545. It survives the winter, has acceptable disease reactions to many of the common diseases in its target area, and has acceptable end-use quality for bread making. After extensive testing, it was released in January 2013. © Crop Science Society of America. All rights reserved. © Crop Science Society of America. All rights reserved.


Peterson S.J.,University of Nebraska - Lincoln | Nuttelman B.L.,University of Nebraska - Lincoln | Burken D.B.,University of Nebraska - Lincoln | Luebbe M.K.,Panhandle Research and Extension Center | And 2 more authors.
Professional Animal Scientist | Year: 2015

A receiving experiment compared a complete pelleted feed (PEL) to a mixed receiving diet (CON) on performance and morbidity of newly received calves. The pellets consisted primarily of corn residue and were designed to replace a conventional grain and forage diet, whereas CON consisted of 32% distillers grains, 32% dry-rolled corn, 32% alfalfa, and 4% supplement to provide vitamins, minerals, and 150 mg per steer monensin daily. The experiment used crossbred steer calves (n = 1,318; initial BW = 266 ± 1.57 kg) in 2 separate locations (an eastern Nebraska location and a western Nebraska location). Within location, steers were blocked by date received and source, and then assigned randomly to pen. Pens within location were assigned randomly to CON or PEL. A treatment × location interaction was observed for DMI (P = 0.03). At the western Nebraska location, no difference in DMI was observed (5.8 vs. 5.9 kg/d for CON and PEL, respectively; P = 0.46); however, DMI was greater for PEL at the eastern Nebraska location (6.7 vs. 7.0 kg/d for CON and PEL, respectively; P < 0.01). No treatment × location interaction was detected for ADG or G:F (P > 0.18). The PEL decreased ADG and G:F (P < 0.01) compared with the CON. Morbidity did not differ among treatments (P = 0.13). Receiving calves on PEL may have a positive effect on DMI but a negative effect on ADG and G:F when compared with a traditional receiving diet. © American Registry of Professional Animal Scientists.


Boyd B.M.,University of Nebraska - Lincoln | Jones A.,University of Nebraska - Lincoln | Franzen-Castle L.,University of Nebraska - Lincoln | Jenkins K.,Panhandle Research and Extension Center | And 5 more authors.
Professional Animal Scientist | Year: 2015

Enteric methane production from cattle and its effect on climate change has been a topic of debate. Multiple studies have explored methods to reduce cattle enteric methane production while simultaneously improving performance. However, most strategies developed have not been widely implemented by cattle producers. Knowledge of producer concerns and perceptions on methane production from cattle and its effect on the environment may be limited. Therefore, the objectives of this survey were to determine what Nebraska producers know about methane production by cattle and how it affects performance and to determine whether different age groups, regions of Nebraska, and production size and type affects producer opinions on enteric methane production and climate change. The survey had a response rate of 22%. Regarding climate change, approximately 39% of producers disagreed, 33% were neutral, and 28% agreed they were concerned. However, producers in central and eastern Nebraska were closer to neutral than producers in western Nebraska (P < 0.05). Younger producers perceived cattle to have a more positive effect on the environment and reported that they were more likely to adopt new management techniques that have been shown to improve animal performance than older producers (P < 0.05). Most producers reported receiving production-related information from veterinarians (47.6%), followed by the "other" category (34.9%), the University of Nebraska (15.6%), and state and federal governments, which were the lowest (1.4 and 0.6%, respectively). In the last 3 yr, approximately 57% of producers attended one or fewer extension meetings, but 37% had not attended any extension meetings. © 2015 American Registry of Professional Animal Scientists.

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