Pancreatic Cancer Action Network

Manhattan Beach, CA, United States

Pancreatic Cancer Action Network

Manhattan Beach, CA, United States
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News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

MONTREAL--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The World Pancreatic Cancer Coalition (WPCC), a global alliance in the fight against pancreatic cancer, will convene for its second meeting in Montreal May 2 – 4. More than 40 pancreatic cancer organizations representing 20 countries are expected to attend. The coalition unites over 60 pancreatic cancer organizations and advocacy groups from around the world who collaborate for the collective good of all people affected by pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic cancer is the seventh most common cause of cancer-related death in men and women combined worldwide.1 Only two to 10 percent of those diagnosed survive five years.2 “Our goal is to unite worldwide in the fight against pancreatic cancer,” said Julie Fleshman, JD, MBA, chair of the WPCC and president and CEO of the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PanCAN). “By working together, we will continue to raise the global visibility of pancreatic cancer with the ultimate goal to improve outcomes for patients.” The two-day meeting allows representatives to share fundraising, media outreach and advocacy best practices, while hearing the latest updates from members of the scientific community, as well as pancreatic cancer survivors. “As an 8 year survivor of pancreatic cancer, I have watched our advocacy efforts grow from a tiny initiative started by three volunteers to a robust national organization with worldwide reach and connections,” said Libby Znaimer, a board member with Pancreatic Cancer Canada. “We must work together to tackle this terrible disease and are delighted to host this year’s global meeting, which will underscore the importance of giving priority to pancreatic cancer.” The World Pancreatic Cancer Coalition oversees World Pancreatic Cancer Day (WPCD), which is observed around the globe each November during pancreatic cancer awareness month. World Pancreatic Cancer Day aims to raise critical global awareness of the disease, because with more research funding and more people taking action, pancreatic cancer survival rates can and will, improve. This year, WPCD will be held on Thursday, November 16. The World Pancreatic Cancer Coalition has the generous support of founding sponsor Celgene Corporation, as well as corporate sponsors Shire and Halozyme, Inc. For additional information on pancreatic cancer, the World Pancreatic Cancer Coalition and its members, please visit worldpancreaticcancercoalition.org. Follow the World Pancreatic Cancer Coalition on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. The World Pancreatic Cancer Coalition is an international group of pancreatic cancer patient advocacy groups with a mission to drive transformational change for all those affected by the disease. Through global collaboration, the coalition raises awareness of pancreatic cancer by strengthening the efforts of participating member organizations. Each November, Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month, coalition members unite on World Pancreatic Cancer Day to draw attention to pancreatic cancer and highlight the need for greater awareness, funding and research.


LOS ANGELES--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network’s Los Angeles Affiliate invites all interested to join PurpleStride Los Angeles, the walk to end pancreatic cancer, on Saturday, May 6, at Exposition Park. PurpleStride Los Angeles will be hosted by television personality and host on FOX Business, Lisa “Kennedy” Montgomery and will feature a performance by Radio Disney star Calista Quinn. Pancreatic cancer remains the nation’s deadliest major cancer with a five-year survival rate of just nine percent. The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PanCAN) has an urgent mission to improve outcomes for patients currently battling the disease and to double pancreatic cancer survival by 2020. Each year, more than 80,000 people in cities across the U.S. participate in PurpleStride. Funds raised through this signature event support the organization’s key initiatives, including Precision Promise, Know Your TumorSM and the Patient Registry. Julie Fleshman, JD, MBA, the President and CEO of the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, lost her father to the disease in 1999 and has since made it her passion to change the course of pancreatic cancer. “The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network funds research and other critical programs and services for patients and their families,” said Fleshman. “PurpleStride provides the opportunity to raise funds that will support these efforts, helping to change outcomes for patients facing the disease today and those who will face it tomorrow.” Confirmed attendees include “Better Call Saul” and “American Horror Story” actress Liana Mendoza, TV host and sports broadcaster Lindsay McCormick and New Orleans Saints linebacker James Anderson. Los Angeles PurpleStride is supported by national presenting sponsor Celgene; national gold sponsor AbbVie; regional gold sponsor Halozyme, Inc.; gold sponsors Cedars-Sinai and Kathryn Naficy Pancreatic Foundation; and gold media sponsors CBS2/KCAL9 and KSWD-The Sound. To register, donate or learn more about PurpleStride Los Angeles, please visit www.purplestride.org/losangeles. For more on PurpleStride and the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, watch this PurpleStride PSA and the organization’s PSA. The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PanCAN) is accelerating the pace of research progress for one of the world’s deadliest cancers. With an urgent mission to improve outcomes for pancreatic cancer patients and double survival by 2020, the organization, founded in 1999, executes a bold and comprehensive strategy to Wage Hope through research, patient services, advocacy and community engagement. The organization’s visionary goals, world-class programs and services, extensive grassroots network, patient-focused outcomes and advisory board of scientific and medical leaders, provide the critical backdrop to help pancreatic cancer patients today and create transformational change for all patients in the future.


News Article | April 6, 2017
Site: www.medicalnewstoday.com

The study - led by a team from the Garvan Institute of Medical Research in Sydney, Australia - is published in the journal Science Translational Medicine. Dr. Marina Pajic and Dr. Paul Timpson, both of Garvan's Kinghorn Cancer Centre, co-led the research. Dr. Timpson says that the vision of the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network - to double pancreatic cancer survival by 2020 - inspired pancreatic cancer researchers from around the world to come together and work on the study. Pancreatic cancer starts in the cells of the pancreas - a narrow, six-inch-long fish-shaped organ that sits behind the stomach. The pancreas contains two main types of cell: exocrine cells that make enzymes for digestion, and endocrine cells that make hormones such as insulin and glucagon for controlling blood sugar. The vast majority of pancreatic cancers start in exocrine cells. Unfortunately, as the early symptoms are vague and difficult to pin down, pancreatic cancer is often only diagnosed once it is advanced, leaving patients with inoperable tumors and few treatment options. The dismal survival rate of just 7 percent has not altered much in 40 years, note the study authors. Estimates from the American Cancer Society suggest that, in the United States, around 53,670 people will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and 43,090 people will die of the disease in 2017. Treatment options for inoperable pancreatic cancer are very limited - the standard-of-care is combination chemotherapy, but this only moderately improves survival. Treatment is further complicated by the fact that pancreatic tumors have a dense tissue structure that is difficult for drugs to penetrate. For their study, the researchers used mice genetically engineered to develop pancreatic cancer, as well as mice implanted with patient-derived pancreatic tumor tissue. They found that "priming" the tumors with a 3-day course of Fasudil before standard-of-care chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer doubled survival and reduced cancer spread. Fasudil inhibits a protein called ROCK, which scientists believe stiffens cells surrounding tumors and helps to drive cancer progression. The drug is already in clinical use in Japan for the treatment of stroke, note the researchers. They say that the drug temporarily "softens" the tumor tissue so that it more readily responds to the combination chemotherapy at both primary and secondary sites. It acts on the stroma - the complex microenvironment of cells, blood vessels, and other structures that surround the cancer cells. The researchers say that the drug "slackens" the structure of this tumor microenvironment and also makes the blood vessels leaky. Both of these effects improve the effectiveness of the subsequent chemotherapy. The team observed the effects in real time: using state-of-the-art intravital microscopy, they could see into the pancreatic tumors in the live mice. Dr. Pajic explains: "We saw the stroma weaken over time, and [we] could also see that cancer cells did not spread so readily to secondary sites such as the liver." With the help of quantum dots in the animals' bloodstream, the team was also able to watch how the blood vessels supplying the tumor changed over time. "It was remarkable to watch the quantum dots radiate out from blood vessels adjacent to the tumors after Fasudil treatment - which is an indicator that the vessels have become leaky," says Dr. Pajic. The interaction between cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment is known to be an important factor in tumor survival and progression of pancreatic cancer and other cancers that have solid tumors. For example, researchers working on immunotherapy for cancers with solid tumors are also coming to the conclusion that tackling the tumor microenvironment is key to treatment success. This was recently highlighted in a study of immunotherapy for ovarian cancer. Learn about a study that challenges thinking on progression of pancreatic cancer.


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

WASHINGTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network’s National Capital Area Affiliate invites the community to walk to end pancreatic cancer at PurpleStride Washington D.C., presented by the Washington Capitals, on Saturday, June 10, at Freedom Plaza. In addition to thousands of local supporters, patients and survivors, PurpleStride Washington D.C. will welcome “The Voice” season two semi-finalist Erin Willett, who will perform the National Anthem. Pancreatic cancer is the nation’s deadliest major cancer, with a five-year survival of just 9 percent. The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PanCAN) is a trailblazing organization addressing pancreatic cancer through research, clinical initiatives, patient services and advocacy with an immediate mission to improve patient outcomes today and to double pancreatic cancer survival by 2020. “More than 53,000 Americans will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer this year and 91 percent of those patients will not live past five years,” said Lynn Matrisian, PhD, MBA, chief science officer for the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network. “Funds raised through PurpleStride help advance pancreatic cancer research and ultimately improve patient outcomes.” Each year, more than 80,000 people in cities across the U.S. Wage Hope at PurpleStride, the walk to end pancreatic cancer, and have raised more than $76 million since 2008. These funds support the organization’s key initiatives, including Precision Promise℠, Know Your Tumor® and the Patient Registry. Josh Yazman, spokesperson for the National Capital Area Affiliate, lost his mother to pancreatic cancer in 2014 after a four-year battle with the disease. “I knew about PanCAN since my mother’s diagnosis, but I didn’t get involved until a friend invited me to PurpleStride in 2014,” Yazman said. “After that first event, I was hooked on the commitment that everyone shared to improve patient outcomes. PurpleStride is an opportunity to connect with thousands of people affected by pancreatic cancer and take actionable steps towards finding a cure by fundraising.” The Washington D.C. event is supported by national presenting sponsor Celgene; presenting sponsor Washington Capitals; national gold sponsor AbbVie; and gold sponsor Kovler Fund of CFNCR. To register, donate or learn more about PurpleStride Washington D.C., please visit purplestride.org/dc. For more on PurpleStride and the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, watch the PurpleStride PSA and the organization’s PSA. The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PanCAN) is dedicated to fighting the world’s toughest cancer. In our urgent mission to save lives, we attack pancreatic cancer on all fronts: research, clinical initiatives, patient services and advocacy. Our effort is amplified by a nationwide network of grassroots support. We are determined to improve patient outcomes today and to double survivor by 2020.


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

SAN FRANCISCO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network’s San Francisco Affiliate invites everyone to join PurpleStride San Francisco on June 18, at Justin Herman Plaza. Diane Borrison, a Bay Area resident, understands the importance of PurpleStride and its impact on the pancreatic cancer community – both locally and nationally. “As an 11-year pancreatic cancer survivor, I have a responsibility to do all I can to change the course of this devastating disease,” Borrison said. “I choose to fundraise for PurpleStride because I know that the money raised will be used to advance critical pancreatic cancer research and clinical initiatives. Through fundraising, we can create a better future for all pancreatic cancer patients.” Each year, more than 80,000 people in cities across the United States Wage Hope at PurpleStride, the walk to end pancreatic cancer. Each participant walks to improve outcomes for the nation’s deadliest cancer, one that has a five-year survival of just 9 percent. Funds raised through PurpleStride allow the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PanCAN) to attack pancreatic cancer on all fronts: research, clinical initiatives, patient services and advocacy. Since 2003, the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network has awarded 142 grants to 143 scientists at 55 institutions, totaling $35.4 million. In addition to supporting research grants, PanCAN supports key initiatives like Precision PromiseSM, Know Your Tumor® and the Patient Registry. “Our goal at the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network is to double survival by 2020 and we are committed to making that happen,” said Julie Fleshman, JD, MBA, President and CEO of the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network. “PurpleStride is allowing us to fund key initiatives that will improve patient outcomes and ultimately help us reach our 2020 goal.” PurpleStride San Francisco will be hosted by National Emmy Award winner and CBS San Francisco anchor Joe Vazquez and will include kid-friendly activities and a purple play zone. The San Francisco event is supported by national presenting sponsor Celgene; national gold sponsor AbbVie; regional gold sponsor Cancer Treatment Centers of America, gold sponsor Halozyme, gold media sponsor KPIX5/KBCW 44 Cable 12, and silver sponsor Clovis Oncology. To register, donate or learn more about PurpleStride San Francisco, please visit purplestride.org/sanfrancisco. For more on PurpleStride and the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, watch the PurpleStride PSA and the organization’s PSA. Follow the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network on Twitter, Instagram or on Facebook. The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PanCAN) is dedicated to fighting the world’s toughest cancer. In our urgent mission to save lives, we attack pancreatic cancer on all fronts: research, clinical initiatives, patient services and advocacy. Our effort is amplified by a nationwide network of grassroots support. We are determined to improve patient outcomes today and to double survivor by 2020.


MANHATTAN BEACH, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PanCAN) has promoted Mark Edmiaston to serve as the organization’s first chief development and community engagement officer. Edmiaston, who formerly served as vice president of development, will oversee the overarching strategy of the organization’s development and community engagement departments and will report to Julie Fleshman, JD, MBA, president and CEO of PanCAN. In his new role, Edmiaston will also ensure that the organization is focusing on its affiliates and strengthening their volunteer network, including the mission-based activities in the markets they represent. “Our organization is sustainable because of our volunteers, donors and supporters from across the country,” said Fleshman. “Mark’s new role will ensure alignment and efficiencies across all of our fundraising and volunteer-driven efforts, which will ultimately create more opportunities for us to meet our goals and double pancreatic cancer survival by 2020.” Though the five-year survival has increased one percentage point every year over the past three years, from 6 to 9 percent, the disease remains the deadliest major cancer. To combat these tough statistics, the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network invests in groundbreaking initiatives like its Know Your Tumor® molecular profile program and Precision Promise, a first-of-its-kind precision medicine adaptive clinical trial. “I am honored to be a part of a trailblazing organization that is committed to changing the course of the nation’s toughest cancer,” Edmiaston said. “The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network is on a mission to create a better future for all pancreatic cancer patients and I’m thrilled to be a part of this movement.” Prior to joining PanCAN, Edmiaston oversaw the fitness and endurance division for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital — a division that he launched and developed to support the organization’s growth objectives. He also served as president of the Children’s Brain Tumor Foundation, where he oversaw the nonprofit’s nationwide efforts to increase research funding, advocacy and patient services for children and their families impacted by the condition. Edmiaston spent the first two decades of his career with the American Cancer Society, where he played a key role in expanding Relay For Life in terms of revenue, participation and communities served. This culminated with his role as chief development and community engagement officer for a 12-state Division. Edmiaston holds a B.A. in International Economics and Trade from Texas Tech University. The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PanCAN) is accelerating the pace of research progress for one of the world’s deadliest cancers. With an urgent mission to improve outcomes for pancreatic cancer patients and double survival by 2020, the organization, founded in 1999, executes a bold and comprehensive strategy to Wage Hope through research, patient services, advocacy and community engagement. The organization’s visionary goals, world-class programs and services, extensive grassroots network, patient-focused outcomes and advisory board of scientific and medical leaders, provide the critical backdrop to help pancreatic cancer patients today and create transformational change for all patients in the future. Learn more about the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network and follow the organization on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.


News Article | December 7, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

A new study published in the just-published "Oncotarget" peer-reviewed medical journal has concluded that “in the setting of previously treated, advanced pancreatic cancer, liquid biopsies are not yet an adequate substitute for tissue biopsies. Further refinement in defining the optimal patient population and timing of blood sampling may improve the value of a blood-based test.” The study was conducted by a team of researchers and clinicians from Perthera, Inc., a precision medicine company based in McLean, VA, the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PanCAN), Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center of Georgetown University, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Ohio State University, City of Hope Cancer Center, Virginia Mason Medical Center, and the Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Thomas Jefferson University. The study is entitled "a pilot study evaluating concordance between blood-based and patient-matched tumor molecular testing within pancreatic patients participating in the Know Your Tumor (KYT) Initiative." Know Your Tumor is a benchmark precision cancer therapy program of the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network that is executed by Perthera. The study asserted that “molecular profiling of the tumor itself should remain the gold standard,” or as approved by the FDA. Liquid biopsies can "go wrong" in a variety of ways: mainly because the tumor isn't dumping DNA into the blood, or because the detection assays aren't sensitive enough to detect the DNA when it is too low in abundance to see. The investigators assessed the ability of the circulating genomic information obtained from a blood sample of 34 consecutively screened pancreatic cancer patients with metastatic disease to accurately recapitulate the genomic information obtained by direct analysis of a tumor biopsy obtained from the same patient taken at the same time. They used the high frequency of KRAS mutation (~90%) in pancreatic cancer as a benchmark for comparison, and they found that KRAS mutations “were only detected in 10/34 (29%) blood samples, compared to 20/23 (87%) tumor tissue biopsies." Dr. Jonathan Brody, the last author on the study and Director of Surgical Research and Co-director of the Jefferson Pancreas, Biliary and Related Cancer Center and on the scientific advisory board at Perthera, cautioned that "the results of this study should give people some pause; we need to be very careful about the state of the liquid biopsy field right now." He said, "we need to be very circumspect- in this study, we detected DNA with KRAS mutations in only a third of the patients that you should see the genomic alteration, so what does it say about being able to reliably detect actionable alterations that doctors would use to make critical treatment decisions?” Dr. Michael Pishvaian, the first author of the study and Perthera’s CMO as well as the Director of the Phase I Clinical Program and Co-Director of the Ruesch Center Pancreatic Cancer Program at Georgetown University added that “there will be times when a tumor biopsy is unable to be performed due to medical issues, and then could a liquid biopsy be considered. Pishvaian says: “There are papers that show good but not perfect concordance between the genomic information in tumor samples and blood samples, and our study in pancreatic cancer reveals something different. Some of the disparate results from these studies come from differences in the clinical aspects of the patients studied, but ultimately if liquid biopsies are to be used routinely for precision medicine applications then the field needs more improvements.” In the meantime, Emanuel “Chip” Petricoin, PhD, Perthera’s Chief Science Officer said, “Central to Perthera’s medical philosophy is that the patient should have as extensive molecular profiling as relevant, and blood-based testing will be great to add to our arsenal of testing options as it becomes more reliable and sensitive. So, we are committed to implementing molecular profiling technologies that have the best evidence of impact to patients' precision cancer therapy outcome and we will be constantly monitoring the state of the field on this topic. As the liquid biopsy technologies and approaches improve and become more sensitive, then we can validate them and implement them." ABOUT PERTHERA, INC.: Perthera is a founder- and venture-backed precision medicine company based in McLean, VA, that has achieved more than 1,000 case histories since it was founded about five years ago, often working in an alliance with cancer advocacy agencies as well as hospitals, community oncology practices, and academia. In every patient instance, the Company seeks to become the precision medicine partner on their cancer care team, providing the widest, deepest, and most independent range of service possible.


News Article | October 7, 2016
Site: www.technologyreview.com

In an effort to give pancreatic cancer patients more treatment options, a patient advocacy organization is testing the idea that individuals should be given different choices based on the genetic characteristics of their tumors. The study, called Precision Promise, will help provide much-needed evidence about the value of precision medicine and, in particular, the value of sequencing tumors as a way of prescribing the most effective treatment. Some 41,780 Americans die from pancreatic cancer every year, and the survival rate over five years is just 8 percent. Current treatment options include surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, but these have varying success rates. What's unknown is how patients with different mutations in their tumors will respond to new types of treatment that are more tailored to individual patients than these traditional approaches. Patients who enroll in the trial, run by the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, will have samples of their tumors collected through a biopsy. Investigators will then perform DNA sequencing on the tumor samples, a technique that will be able to reveal mutations that may be responsible for the cancer. On the basis of that information, patients will be divided into different treatment groups, says Lynn Matrisian, chief research officer at the cancer organization. For example, patients harboring mutations in BRCA, a gene involved in DNA repair that has also been linked to breast and ovarian cancer, will be given a treatment to repair that mutation. Another treatment will target patients with high levels of a molecule called hyaluronan around their tumors. For patients whose tumors don’t fit in those categories, a third approach is available—immunotherapy to kill cancer cells. When the trial opens in spring 2017, it will initially offer these three treatment options. But investigators plan to add additional treatment arms once more patients join. That way, if one treatment doesn’t work for someone, that patient can quickly move to another. The trial will eventually enroll thousands of patients at 12 sites around the country. The National Cancer Institute’s MATCH trial, a bigger precision-medicine project, is trying to answer some of the same questions for a variety of cancer types. The trial, which launched in August 2015, is conducting genomic testing on 5,000 study participants to guide them into treatments that match their genetic profile. Robert Comis, cochair of the ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group, which designed the MATCH trial with the National Cancer Institute, says investigators are looking for genetic mutations that are present in different cancer types and trying to determine whether those mutations can be treated the same way regardless of tumors’ location in the body. Comis thinks we’re likely to see more such trials in the future as drug developers take advantage of cheaper and faster sequencing technology to help them find new drug targets. But he acknowledges that there are substantial costs involved.


News Article | November 15, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Drs. John Paul Gallardo and William P. Lamas are joining the fight against pancreatic cancer by supporting Lauren’s Face the Day Purple Day 2016 event set for November 17, 2016. The event is being planned entirely by volunteers who live and work in the local Coral Gables, FL community and have been affected by the disease. The South Florida periodontists and dental implant specialists will be donating a free comprehensive dental evaluation as well as Philips Sonicare FlexCare Platinum toothbrush kit for one raffle winner. One hundred percent of the funds raised in the event will be donated to the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network to help advance research, support patients, and create hope. Because periodontal disease has been linked to heart disease, strokes, diabetes, respiratory diseases, pregnancy complications, and pancreatic cancer, it is important for the doctors to raise awareness and funds to fight the disease. In fact, researchers have discovered that men with periodontal disease are 54 percent more likely to develop pancreatic cancer. “As a healthcare provider, we have an obligation to make our patients aware of the significant impact that oral health can have on other systems in the body,” said Dr. Gallardo. Pancreatic cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Pancreatic cancer has the lowest survival rate of the major cancer killers, yet it receives the least amount of federal research funding. Seven years ago the co-founder of Lauren’s Face the Day, Alan Sales, was diagnosed with stage 4 Pancreatic Cancer. The team at Lauren’s Face the Day Spa decided that a change needed to be made and Purple Day was founded. Although Alan lost his battle, Lauren’s Face the Day continues the tradition with an evening event at the Spa that hosts live entertainment, food, wine, raffle prizes and an auction. For the last few years, the events have raised over $25,000.00 for Pancreatic Cancer Action Network. Drs. Gallardo and Lamas each have an extensive background in periodontics and implant dentistry. Dr. Gallardo attended the University of Miami, New York University, and Boston University. Dr. Lamas is an alumnus of Barry University, the Florida College of Dentistry, and Baylor College of Dentistry-TAMUS. Both doctors are avid educators, routinely lecturing at conferences, both nationally and around the world. The doctors also offer a wide range of continuing education programs for students and dental providers in southern Florida. To learn more about Drs. Gallardo and Lamas click here. New patient consultations with Dr. Gallardo and Dr. Lamas are free. As an added service, the patient coordinator will run a courtesy benefits check during the initial appointment, then review all payment options and financing choices.


Rahib L.,Pancreatic Cancer Action Network | Smith B.D.,University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center | Aizenberg R.,Pancreatic Cancer Action Network | Rosenzweig A.B.,Pancreatic Cancer Action Network | And 2 more authors.
Cancer Research | Year: 2014

Cancer incidence and deaths in the United States were projected for the most common cancer types for the years 2020 and 2030 based on changing demographics and the average annual percentage changes in incidence and death rates. Breast, prostate, and lung cancers will remain the top cancer diagnoses throughout this time, but thyroid cancer will replace colorectal cancer as the fourth leading cancer diagnosis by 2030, and melanoma and uterine cancer will become the fifth and sixth most common cancers, respectively. Lung cancer is projected to remain the top cancer killer throughout this time period. However, pancreas and liver cancers are projected to surpass breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers to become the second and third leading causes of cancer-related death by 2030, respectively. Advances in screening, prevention, and treatment can change cancer incidence and/or death rates, but it will require a concerted effort by the research and healthcare communities now to effect a substantial change for the future. © 2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

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