Juelsminde, Denmark
Juelsminde, Denmark

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Munk M.B.,Palsgaard A S | Munk M.B.,Copenhagen University | Andersen M.L.,Copenhagen University
European Journal of Lipid Science and Technology | Year: 2015

Oil-in-water emulsions were made with five different triglyceride fats ranging from completely liquid oil to solid. Regardless of the type of dispersed fat, all emulsions were non-aggregated and low viscous when stabilized only by caseinate. Presence of lactic acid ester of monoglyceride (LACTEM) and unsaturated monoglyceride (GMU) caused solidification of emulsions made with fat with intermediate solid fat content (SFC), due to fat globule aggregation. The hardest and most compact fat globule network was obtained for emulsions based on hydrogenated palm kernel oil (HPKO). Although palm kernel oil (PKO) and palm oil (PO) resembled HPKO in terms of fatty acid (FA) composition and SFC, a lower strength of the fat globule network was obtained for emulsions based on PKO and PO. The dispersed fat phase should have intermediate SFC (simultaneous presence of liquid and solid fat) in order to induce fat globule aggregation in emulsions. This was demonstrated by emulsions made with either rapeseed oil (RO) and fully hydrogenated palm oil (FHPO), which remained stable and pourable despite the presence of LACTEM and GMU. Practical applications: This study emphasizes the important role of fat on the texture of O/W-emulsions. This knowledge is vital for the industry in order to control or avoid fat globule aggregation. For manufacturers striving for partial coalescence of emulsions to occur, it is necessary to use low-molecular-weight emulsifiers and fat with intermediate solid fat content. Emulsions stabilized by sodium caseinate remained stable and non-aggregated independent of the type of dispersed fat. When emulsions were stabilized by a combination of sodium caseinate, LACTEM, and GMU, partial coalescence occurred for fat globules with intermediate solid fat content while globules of either solid fat or liquid oil remained stable. Emulsions stabilized by sodium caseinate remained stable and non-aggregated independent of the type of dispersed fat. When emulsions were stabilized by a combination of sodium caseinate, LACTEM, and GMU, partial coalescence occurred for fat globules with intermediate solid fat content while globules of either solid fat or liquid oil remained stable. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Munk M.B.,Palsgaard A S | Larsen F.H.,Copenhagen University | Van Den Berg F.W.J.,Copenhagen University | Knudsen J.C.,Copenhagen University | Andersen M.L.,Copenhagen University
Langmuir | Year: 2014

Low-molecular-weight (LMW) emulsifiers are used to promote controlled destabilization in many dairy-type emulsions in order to obtain stable foams in whippable products. The relation between fat globule aggregation induced by three LMW emulsifiers, lactic acid ester of monoglyceride (LACTEM), saturated monoglyceride (GMS), and unsaturated monoglyceride (GMU) and their effect on interfacial protein displacement was investigated. It was found that protein displacement by LMW emulsifiers was not necessary for fat globule aggregation in emulsions, and conversely fat globule aggregation was not necessarily accompanied by protein displacement. The three LMW emulsifiers had very different effects on emulsions. LACTEM induced shear instability of emulsions, which was accompanied by protein displacement. High stability was characteristic for emulsions with GMS where protein was displaced from the interface. Emulsions containing GMU were semisolid, but only low concentrations of protein were detected in the separated serum phase. The effects of LACTEM, GMS, and GMU may be explained by three different mechanisms involving formation of interfacial α-gel, pickering stabilization and increased exposure of bound casein to the water phase. The latter may facilitate partial coalescence. Stabilizing hydrocolloids did not have any effect on the LMW emulsifiers' ability to induce protein displacement. © 2014 American Chemical Society.


Munk M.B.,Palsgaard A S | Erichsen H.R.,Copenhagen University | Andersen M.L.,Copenhagen University
Journal of Colloid and Interface Science | Year: 2014

Electron Spin Resonance spectroscopy (ESR) was used to measure the mobility of the spin probe TEMPO in O/W-emulsions. This allowed determination of temperature-dependent microviscosity of the liquid fraction in lipid globules. Six hydrogenated palm kernel oil (HPKO) based emulsions containing caseinate and different combinations of lactic acid ester of monoglyceride (LACTEM), unsaturated monoglycerides (GMU) or saturated monoglyceride (GMS) were studied. The non-solidified oil in emulsions made with LACTEM. +. GMU had a high microviscosity, whereas the emulsion made with GMS had a low microviscosity. Also the partitioning of TEMPO between the lipid and aqueous phases was found to be highly temperature dependent, most likely due to the change of solid fat content with temperature. This behaviour may mimic the partitioning of aroma compounds in emulsions. The spin probe 5-doxylstearic acid was used to study the mobility of the components at the lipid globule surfaces. At 5. °C all emulsions had a very low surface mobility. At 25. °C the mobility of the spin probe was found to be correlated to the surface protein load. Emulsions with GMU had a high protein surface coverage and low mobility of the spin probe on the droplet surfaces. Conversely, in presence of LACTEM and GMS, the protein surface loads decreased and high surface mobilities were observed. Based on these results it is argued that the high macroscopic viscosity and lipid agglomeration of emulsions containing GMU is due to a lipid globule-protein-network where the lipid globules are connected via caseinate. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.


Trademark
Palsgaard A S | Date: 2016-03-30

Chemicals used in industry, namely, chemical substances and preparations for making and preserving foodstuffs and chemical additives for use in the manufacture of food; stabilizers and emulsifiers for use in foodstuffs, namely, chemical stabilizers and emulsifiers for use in the manufacture of foods; chemical substances and preparations for use as food additives for use as texturizers in foodstuffs; chemical additives containing lecithin for use as emulsifiers and stabilizers in foodstuffs for use in the manufacture of food; modified and natural starches for use in industry, namely, for industrial purposes; chemical bread and cake improvers in the nature of preservatives and stabilizers; gelatin for industrial uses, namely, food manufacturing; meat tenderizers for foodstuffs for industrial purposes; chemical food additives for use in the manufacture of food; protein as a raw material for use in manufacture; chemical additives for use as flavor enhancers for use in food manufacture; binding agents as food additives for food manufacturing; chemical preparations in form of artificial sweeteners except saccharin; emulsifiers for industrial purposes; vegetable and animal emulsifiers for use in the manufacture of foods. Flour and preparations made from cereal, namely, processed cereals and bread mixes; bread, biscuits, cakes, bakery products, pastry, grinded or crushed preparations of corn, cereals; bread improvers being cereal based preparations; starch-based binding agents for edible ices; fruit essences and flavorings for foods and beverages except etheric essences and essential oils; modified and natural starch for foodstuffs; powders and pre-mixed preparations as food ingredients that contain emulsifiers, texturizers and stabilizers for making bread and bakery products; powders and pre-mixed preparations as food ingredients containing emulsifiers, texturizers and stabilizers for making custard and artificial custard; powders and pre-mixed preparations as food ingredients containing emulsifiers, texturizers and stabilizers for making chocolate candy, cocoa and chocolate-based beverages as well as chocolate-based spreads and cocoa-based spreads; powders and pre-mixed preparations as an ingredient in foods containing emulsifiers, texturizers and stabilizers for making natural and artificial ices, ice-cream, sorbets and sherbet ices; powders and pre-mixed preparations as an ingredient in foods containing emulsifiers, texturizers and stabilizers for making sauces, including salad dressings, mayonnaise and tomato ketchup in the nature of a sauce.


Patent
Palsgaard A S | Date: 2010-07-13

The present invention relates to frozen food products, such as ice creams, comprising special emulsifying systems. The emulsifying system preferably contains mono esters of 5 propane-1,2-diol and fatty acids, such as 2-PGME, and it may furthermore contain additional emulsifiers such as 1-PGME and/or diglycerides. The frozen food products are characterised by improved organoleptic and sensory properties as well a reduced rate of melting. The invention furthermore relates to the emulsifying systems as such as well as methods of preparing the frozen food product.


The present invention pertains to compositions containing a first population of water-insoluble particles and a polyol poly(hydroxy fatty acid) ester emulsifier, such as for example coatings or paint compositions containing inorganic pigment dispersed in an organic binder and/or organic solvent. The present invention furthermore relates to methods of producing such compositions and various uses.


Trademark
Palsgaard A S | Date: 2012-05-11

Chemicals for use in industry, namely, chemical substances and preparations in the form of emulsifiers, stabilizers, thickeners and texturisers for use in the manufacture of foods, confectionery, bakery products, cosmetics and plastics.


Patent
Palsgaard A S | Date: 2010-10-20

The present invention relates to frozen food products, such as ice creams, comprising special emulsifying systems. The emulsifying system preferably contains mono esters of propane-1,2-diol and fatty acids, such as 2-PGME, and it may furthermore contain additional emulsifiers such as 1-PGME and/or diglycerides. The frozen food products are characterised by improved organoleptic and sensory properties as well a reduced rate of melting. The invention furthermore relates to the emulsifying systems as such as well as methods of preparing the frozen food product.


Patent
Palsgaard A S | Date: 2011-09-13

The present invention relates to a refined vegetable oil as well as a method of producing it. The method uses the combination of a polyol-containing solvent, such as glycerol, and an alkalizing agent for selectively extracting free fatty acids from the vegetable oil.


PubMed | Palsgaard A S and Copenhagen University
Type: | Journal: Journal of colloid and interface science | Year: 2014

Electron Spin Resonance spectroscopy (ESR) was used to measure the mobility of the spin probe TEMPO in O/W-emulsions. This allowed determination of temperature-dependent microviscosity of the liquid fraction in lipid globules. Six hydrogenated palm kernel oil (HPKO) based emulsions containing caseinate and different combinations of lactic acid ester of monoglyceride (LACTEM), unsaturated monoglycerides (GMU) or saturated monoglyceride (GMS) were studied. The non-solidified oil in emulsions made with LACTEM+GMU had a high microviscosity, whereas the emulsion made with GMS had a low microviscosity. Also the partitioning of TEMPO between the lipid and aqueous phases was found to be highly temperature dependent, most likely due to the change of solid fat content with temperature. This behaviour may mimic the partitioning of aroma compounds in emulsions. The spin probe 5-doxylstearic acid was used to study the mobility of the components at the lipid globule surfaces. At 5C all emulsions had a very low surface mobility. At 25C the mobility of the spin probe was found to be correlated to the surface protein load. Emulsions with GMU had a high protein surface coverage and low mobility of the spin probe on the droplet surfaces. Conversely, in presence of LACTEM and GMS, the protein surface loads decreased and high surface mobilities were observed. Based on these results it is argued that the high macroscopic viscosity and lipid agglomeration of emulsions containing GMU is due to a lipid globule-protein-network where the lipid globules are connected via caseinate.

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