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Hassan M.A.,University of British Columbia | Shahin K.,AECOM Technology Corporation | Klinkenberg B.,University of British Columbia | McIntyre G.,University of British Columbia | And 3 more authors.
Geography Compass | Year: 2010

Future predictions regarding the effects of climate change on water resources are complex and therefore inherently uncertain. However, the conclusions presented in most studies on the subject indicate that current water-poor regions such as the Middle East will experience even greater water stress with climate change. In this article we find that Palestinian and Israeli water managers must plan for future water crises that will likely result from the combined effects of climate change and increasing urbanization that results from an exponential population growth. Climate change will likely increase water stress in the region through the processes of increasing temperature, decreasing and erratic precipitation and reduced overall aquifer replenishment. Urbanization will further strain freshwater supplies by negatively impacting the quality and quantity of available freshwater in an increasingly populated urban environment. In spite of any inherent uncertainty, water managers in the region need to consider the long-term effects of both urbanization and climate change in any future water management scheme. © 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.


Hassan M.A.,University of British Columbia | McIntyre G.,University of British Columbia | Klinkenberg B.,University of British Columbia | Al-Rahman Tamimi A.,Palestinian Hydrology Group PHG | And 3 more authors.
Geography Compass | Year: 2010

Transboundary water issues are not new; however, the Palestinian case represents a unique situation that is atypical from most transboundary water conflicts. This difference is marked most importantly by the issue of lack of domestic control over water resources within the Palestinian Territories. Since the Israeli occupation of the West Bank in 1967, Palestinian water policy has been dictated by Israeli control, which has resulted in an allocational shift in water distribution in the Palestinian Territories. In this article we review transboundary water practices and conflicts, water resources, allocation and consumption, water perception, and water reuse and conservation in the Palestinian West Bank in order to assess contemporary trends in water practices as well as recommend strategies for improving regional water management. Water use and perception are assessed based on an extensive unpublished research survey conducted by the Palestinian Hydrology Group in 2002. The final report from this survey focused on developing criteria and linking initial results from the survey to the design of a cost effective and equitable water delivery system that would provide all Palestinians with basic water needs. In this article, through a reassessment and statistical analysis of their data, we support the recommendations of this initial survey, including the implementation of an increasing block tariff system as a means of sustainably delivering water throughout the West Bank. However, any future water management cannot proceed in an effective manner unless some level of water control is relinquished by Israel. © 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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