Augusta, GA, United States
Augusta, GA, United States

Paine College is a private historically black college located in Augusta, Georgia. The college is experiencing financial issues and has been placed on probation by its regional accreditor the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. Wikipedia.


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Wang L.,Paine College | Wan P.-J.,Illinois Institute of Technology | Yao F.,Tsinghua University
IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing | Year: 2013

Connected dominating set (CDS) has a wide range of applications in mutihop wireless networks. The Minimum CDS problem has been studied extensively in mutihop wireless networks with uniform communication ranges. However, in practice, the nodes may have different communication ranges either because of the heterogeneity of the nodes, or due to interference mitigation, or due to a chosen range assignment for energy conservation. In this paper, we present a greedy approximation algorithm for computing a Minimum CDS in multihop wireless networks with disparate communications ranges and prove that its approximation ratio is better than the best one known in the literature. Our analysis utilizes a tighter relation between the independence number and the connected domination number. © 2002-2012 IEEE.


Moskowitz I.S.,U.S. Navy | Lawless W.,Paine College
AAAI Spring Symposium - Technical Report | Year: 2016

We consider the effects of a human in the loop with respect to dramatic behavior in a team environment in this position paper. This dramatic behavior is captured mathematically as a jump in behavior. We cite recent examples and discuss earlier work in the cognitive sciences. We consider the problem in light of network science. Copyright © 2015, Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (www.aaai.org). All rights reserved.


Lawless W.F.,Paine College | Sofge D.A.,U.S. Navy
AAAI Spring Symposium - Technical Report | Year: 2016

Traditional theories of social models conceptualize teams as distributed processors, disregarding the interdependence necessary to multi-task. Yet, interdependence characterizes social behavior. Instead, traditional theory favor cooperation, a state of least entropy production (LEP), without understanding the causes, limits or consequences of cooperation. As a simple example of interdependence, foraging prey overgraze forests free of predators. In our model, interdependence creates uncertainty, tradeoffs and signals (e.g., prices, coordination, innovation). Unlike individuals, the ability of teams to multitask reflects a quantum-like entanglement that represents maximum entropy production (MEP) when solving the problems signaled by society to improve its welfare. Our model supports findings that evolution in nature is driven by the MEP from making intelligent choices. Exploiting interdependence improves team intelligence, improves performance and reduces the risk of human error; forced cooperation disorganizes it by increasing the risk of error; e.g., if team cooperation improves teamwork, widespread forced cooperation in an autocracy or bureaucracy reduces social intelligence by adding unnecessary noise to signals. In our model, competition between teams self-organizes outsiders willing to sort through the noise for signals of the choices that improve social welfare (e.g., teams in courtrooms; science; entertainment; sports; businesses). Social systems organized around competition (e.g., stronger signals from robust checks and balances) better control a society by more correctly sizing teams to solve problems with fewer errors compared to autocracies or bureaucracies. Overall, we predict, the density of MEP directed at solving problems in a society with the constraints imposed from strong checks and balances, yet able to freely self-organize its labor and capital within those constraints, is denser. Copyright © 2016, Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (www.aaai.org). All rights reserved.


Lawless W.F.,Paine College
Journal of Engineering Science and Technology Review | Year: 2015

We report on the development of a mathematical model of social uncertainty relations to replace traditional models of the interaction, as well as a model of complexity from econophysics. Our goal with this mathematics is to control hybrid teams, firms and systems (i.e., where "hybrids" are arbitrary combinations of humans, robots and machines). But uncertainty is created by states of interdependence between social objects: at one extreme, interdependence reduces to independence between agents, producing rational but asocial effects; at the other extreme, interdependence de-individuates a group's members until individual identity dissolves into a group (e.g., strong cults, mobs, gangs, and well-run teams and firms). In other studies, we have reviewed the structure of teams; in this report, we focus on how interdependence impedes efforts at direct control by making meaning incomplete. We begin with bistability to simplify interdependence, and generalize to full interdependence. © 2015 Kavala Institute of Technology.


Wang L.,Paine College | Wan P.-J.,Illinois Institute of Technology | Banks B.,Paine College
IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications | Year: 2016

Minimum-latency beaconing scheduling (MLBS) has been well studied when all the nodes are always awake. However, it is well-known that the networking nodes often switch between the active state and the sleep state to save energy. None of the known algorithms for MLBS are suitable for duty-cycled multihop wireless networks. In this paper, we study MLBS in duty-cycled multihop wireless networks (MLBSDC). Under the protocol interference model, we first present two constant-approx. algorithms for MLBSDC with the approx. bounds independent of /T/, the length of a scheduling period. Then, we develop an efficient algorithm for MLBSDC under the physical interference model. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper that develops constant-approx. algorithms for any communication scheduling with the approx. bounds independent of /T/ when the duty-cycled scenarios are taken into consideration. © 2015 IEEE.


Wang L.,Paine College | Wan P.-J.,Illinois Institute of Technology | Young K.,Paine College
Proceedings - IEEE INFOCOM | Year: 2015

Beaconing is a primitive communication task in which every node locally broadcasts a packet to all of its neighbors within a fixed distance. The problem Minimum Latency Beaconing Schedule (MLBS) seeks a shortest schedule for beaconing subject to the interference constraint. MLBS has been well studied when all the nodes are always awake. However, it is well-known that the networking nodes often switch between the active state and the sleep state to save energy. A node in duty-cycled scenarios may require transmitting multiple times to inform all of its neighbors due to their different active times. Thus, all of the known algorithms for MLBS are not suitable for duty-cycled multihop wireless networks. In this paper, we study MLBS in Duty-Cycled multihop wireless networks (MLBSDC). We first present two constant-approximation algorithms for MLBSDC under the protocol interference model with the approximation bounds independent of the length of a scheduling period. Then, we develop an efficient algorithm for MLBSDC under the physical interference model. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper that develops efficient algorithms for MLBSDC under either of these two interference models. © 2015 IEEE.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 162.26K | Year: 2012

This project will conduct analytical studies on multi-hop wireless networks under a realistic shadowing model with an important boundary effect taken into consideration. The project will investigate the critical transmission power required for each node to ensure that the network is connected asymptotically almost surely under a shadowing model, and explore the relation between the probability that the network is connected and the probability that the network has no isolated nodes. The impact of radio irregularity on network connectivity and radio interference in practical multihop wireless networks under the shadowing model will be examined. The ultimate goal of this project is to make significant improvements for research and education in computer science at Paine College and increase the participation of African American undergraduate students in computer science research.

The rapid proliferation of mobile and wireless devices provides an excellent opportunity for theoretic research in the wireless networking area. The log-normal shadowing model is a realistic radio propagation model which has been widely used. The important boundary effect must be taken into consideration in any practical multihop wireless networks. Under such a shadowing model with the boundary effect included, little is known about connectivity of practical multihop wireless networks and the impact of radio irregularity on connectivity and interference. The results of this research will be of interest in areas such as throughput capacity, virtual backbone, topology control, routing protocols, information theory and networking. Multihop wireless networks are expected to play a key role in solving problems such as securing our homeland, protecting the infrastructure, monitoring conditions in the biosphere, or in the diagnosis and treatment of illnesses.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: HIST BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIV | Award Amount: 193.96K | Year: 2015

The Historically Black Colleges and Universities-Undergraduate Program (HBCU-UP) Research Initiation Awards (RIAs) provide support to STEM junior faculty at HBCUs who are starting to build a research program, as well as for mid-career faculty who may have returned to the faculty ranks after holding an administrative post or who needs to redirect and rebuild a research program. Faculty members may pursue research at their home institution, at an NSF-funded Center, at a research intensive institution or at a national laboratory. The RIA projects are expected to help further the faculty members research capability and effectiveness, to improve research and teaching at his or her home institution, and to involve undergraduate students in research experiences. With support from the National Science Foundation, Paine College will conduct research to develop bio-fouling resistant surfaces. The project will enhance the research capabilities of the PI as well as teaching and learning at Paine College. The project will provide undergraduate students with research opportunities and advance skills in chemistry. This experience will help to build the competency of the undergraduate students and support the nations efforts in building a robust STEM workforce.

This study will investigate an approach that will allow thiol-terminated surfaces to be used and re-used by attaching molecules with antifouling functional groups via a disulfide bond. The specific objectives are to: 1) engineer silicon-based thin films for antifouling functionalization; and 2) confirm antifouling function of chemically modified substrates. Findings from this project will provide new knowledge on silicon surface modification. This approach may be used for the modification of surfaces of other materials, such as carbon-based materials. The development of techniques for surface modification also can be used for building protein arrays with nano-sized features on silicon or carbon surfaces. The results of this project may be transferable to the shipping and biomedical industries, and become a solution to reduce the costs associated with fouling. This project will be conducted in collaboration with Marshall University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: HIST BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIV | Award Amount: 193.03K | Year: 2015

The Historically Black Colleges and Universities-Undergraduate Program (HBCU-UP) Research Initiation Awards (RIAs) provide support to STEM faculty at HBCUs including junior faculty who are starting to build a research program and mid-career faculty returning to the faculty ranks after holding an administrative post or who need to redirect and rebuild a research program. Faculty members may pursue research at their home institution, at an NSF-funded Center, at a research intensive institution or at a national laboratory. The RIA projects are expected to help further the faculty members research capability and effectiveness, to improve research and teaching at his or her home institution, and to involve undergraduate students in research experiences. Paine College will conduct research on the role that rainfall plays in mobilizing bacterial pathogens which are linked to human health. The project will help build the research capacity at Paine College and will have a major impact on a large population of minority students. The research opportunities and modification of existing curricular offerings will provide undergraduate students with advanced skills in environmental science and enhance teaching and learning at Paine College. In addition, Paine College will enhance its outreach activities to the community by training students majoring in Education who will develop an online teaching module for high schools.

The project will integrate water quality surveillance, microcosm studies, environmental sampling, traditional culturing and quantitative molecular analysis to assess the ecological implications of rainfall events on mobilization of four opportunistic enteric pathogens and elicitation of acid stress response (ASR) within a freshwater floodplain. The principle objectives are to: 1) characterize the role of rainfall events in mobilization of sediment associated bacterial communities into a seasonal wetland, and 2) characterize ASR elicitation of the bacterial community within a wetland and riverine system. Findings from this work will strengthen understanding of bacterial community structure and function in aquatic ecosystems, may aid in identification of seasonal environmental hot spots of bacterial pathogenicity and may transform paradigms of seasonally influenced bacterial diseases. This project has the potential to transform current mechanistic linkages of opportunistic pathogen mobilization into seasonal wetlands and the contributions of these aquatic ecosystems in conditioning bacterial pathogenicity and community structure.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: HIST BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIV | Award Amount: 408.87K | Year: 2013

Paine College proposes to implement a project entitled Undertanding Barriers to STEM Education for African American Women. The project will investigate the underlying factors linked to the disproportionate participation of African American women in STEM fields. Specifically, the PI will identify the psychological and contextual barriers that limit their preparation in STEM disciplines using a consolidated longitudinal mixed methods research design. The study will investigate the link between career decisions and self-efficacy and the impact of the learning context on African American womens persistence in STEM. The study will also identify patterns of secondary education preparation in math and science that differentiate STEM and non-STEM African American females.

The project will enhance the body of knowledge on ethnic minorities by presenting a rigorous research study beyond anecdotal data that gives a better understanding of the socialization experiences of ethnic minority students, especially African American females. The study can be replicated at other HBCUs and other institutions seeking to circumvent contextual barriers through holistic interventions designed for African American female students. It also could provide new insights into the intersectionality of gender and race.

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