Paediatrics

Leeds, United Kingdom

Paediatrics

Leeds, United Kingdom

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News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

For me, parenting often feels like endlessly having to say no. No, we can’t have Kinder Eggs for breakfast. No, we can’t buy a horse. No, it doesn’t matter that you only met her once, you still can’t wear swimming trunks to Auntie Ethel’s funeral. Although that last one was my husband. Now my eldest son is six, and has discovered video games, there’s a new no to add to the list: no, we can’t sit around playing Crash Bandicoot in our pants all day. Even though this is basically how I spent the whole of the 90s, and it’s what I’d be doing now if I didn’t have two small children. I do manage to get some gaming in, thanks largely to the fact it’s part of my job. I write about games for a living, and also appear as the games expert on TV show Dara O Briain’s Go 8 Bit. So I can tell you all sorts of fun facts about when Space Invaders was invented and why Mario has a moustache. I’m less confident when it comes to parenting – I may be able to speed-run the first level of Sonic the Hedgehog in under 45 seconds, but I have yet to get a small child to put his shoes on in less than 25 minutes. Nevertheless, other parents often ask me about managing their kids’ gaming. It’s the question I most hear at the school gates, apart from, “Didn’t you know it’s World Book Day?” and, “Is that wine on your trousers?” So for what it’s worth, here are my top tips. Like films, all video games carry age ratings, and it’s worth paying attention to these. If you wouldn’t let your child watch an 18-rated film, they shouldn’t be playing an 18-rated game. Fortunately, it’s a myth that all games are about shooting stuff. There are 18,000 titles on Amazon with an age rating of 3+. Some of them are even good. What would I recommend? Well, you might want to look out for games that encourage kids to create, such as Minecraft, LittleBigPlanet, Lego Worlds or Super Mario Maker. They get to use their imaginations, and you get to feel slightly less guilty that they’re not playing the violin and learning fractions. If you have a tablet, Toca Boca makes beautiful, interesting games for young children that won’t have you crying with boredom within 30 seconds. PRO TIP: If you’re a lapsed gamer, consider introducing your child to some of your old favourites – that way you can have a nostalgic chat, and also beat them. These days there are swish remakes of classics like Ratchet & Clank and Crash Bandicoot, plus new instalments in fondly remembered series such as Legend of Zelda and Mario Kart. Don’t bother with the original games; they’re all horribly difficult and look like they’re made of Ceefax. Alternatively, try and find kid-friendly versions of the games you enjoy playing anyway. If you love Grand Theft Auto, try Lego City Undercover; if you’re a fan of Doom, introduce your kids to Splatoon. This way they may be able to turn pro by the time they’re 13, guaranteeing you a handsome retirement fund. Ideally, my kids would spend their days building rafts out of foraged driftwood and catching trout while laughing gaily in the sunshine. Unfortunately, we live in the real world. Catford, to be specific. Also, they hate that stuff. I do make sure they spend time outdoors, and enjoy other good things like reading books, attending music lessons and constructing elaborate weapons out of old cornflake boxes. But I also allow them to play video games, because kids need downtime. It’s about balance – I don’t let them play games all day, just like I don’t let them eat Kinder Eggs for every meal. Unless it’s Easter. Or we’ve run out of fish fingers. PRO TIP: There are no official UK guidelines on screen time. The American Academy of Paediatrics recommends no screen time at all for children under the age of 18 months, followed by a maximum of one hour a day up to the age of five. There’s no suggested number of hours for children aged six and up, but, you know, doing anything for more than a few hours a day is probably not a good idea – 90 mins is often bandied around as a sensible upper limit. There is, however, a lot of complicated research into this subject, which tends to get inaccurately reported – often when the tabloid press has run out of stories about Kim Kardashian. Earlier this year, a group of scientists wrote an open letter asking for screen time advice to be based on actual evidence, and that playing games is not inherently harmful. And who am I to argue with scientists? It can be easier to get kids off their consoles if you agree a time limit at the start of the session. Give them a five minute warning before the time is up, so they have a chance to save their progress. Be firm, but reasonable; if they really do need just one more minute to finish the match or beat the boss, show magnanimity. Hell hath no fury like a child whose mum pulls the plug just as they’re about to finally defeat the Blargian Snagglebeast. The nuclear option is to tell them that every minute they spend playing after the time limit expires will cost them five minutes of their next session. This may end up requiring a spreadsheet and a calculator. PRO TIP: For younger kids, use a kitchen timer to set the agreed limit and place it somewhere they can see it (not reach it – they may be unable to tell the time, but they aren’t dumb.) Managing your child’s exposure to games at other people’s houses can be trickier than evading the cops after you’ve robbed a Rockford Hills jewellery store and run over a pimp. It’s a social minefield: how do you tell another parent you don’t think your kid should be playing games that their child is allowed to play, without making them feel like you’re judging them, which you are? It’s best to be honest, but not too honest. Put the emphasis on your child - explain you’re concerned about how mature they are, how easily influenced they might be, whether they’re developmentally ready to see a Nazi zombie battered to death with a rusty pipe, and so on. Chances are the other parent will be sympathetic, and will wait till you’re out of earshot to laugh at your lily-livered Guardian reader sensibilities. PRO TIP: There is a lack of conclusive evidence about the link between video games and violent behaviour, and lots of debate. A small amount of exposure is unlikely to turn your child into a homicidal maniac. The important thing is to maintain an open, honest exchange of dialogue. Or if you have teenagers, just do your best to interpret the eye-rolls. As with most aspects of parenting, managing your kids’ gaming comes down to a combination of making informed, considered decisions, and making it up as you go along. Arm yourself with facts - get to know the Pegi ratings system, and learn how to use your console’s parental controls (the Xbox One, PS4 and Nintendo Switch all have them, as do tablets and phones – the InternetMatters site has a handy guide). You know your child better than anyone else, so trust your instincts when it comes to what’s right for them. Most importantly, remember that video games are brilliant, and can be great for children. They can teach us how to create, how to play, and how to lose. They are thrilling, inspiring, scary, beautiful and hilarious, sometimes all at the same time. Most of all, they are fun. And both kids and grownups could use some of that these days.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

Every weekday, millions of primary school children across the UK put their lives at risk. Break time brings relief for busy teachers and is often met with screams of delight as children run out onto the playground. But in many of our major cities, tens of thousands of children in hundreds of schools, nurseries and colleges are at risk as they inhale diesel pollution breaching EU air quality standards. Across the UK, more than 40,000 people die prematurely from diesel pollution, at a cost of £20bn each year, according to the Royal Colleges of Physicians and of Paediatrics 2016 report. Now 50% of new cars are diesel, with each car producing many times more fumes than laboratory tests had previously indicated. The VW scandal has shown that the motor industry cannot be trusted and the royal colleges’ report finds that babies and children are particularly at risk. Foetuses in pregnant women exposed to air pollution are more likely to suffer effects to their lungs, heart and neurological development. Children in “clean air zones”, areas where the air quality problem is most serious, have a 10% reduced lung capacity and have more respiratory problems, together with effects on their nervous, immune and cardiovascular systems. This leads to physical and mental health problems in later life. The government has compelling evidence to act now. Instead it fears the backlash of diesel drivers who bought their cars in good faith and are still encouraged to do so by lower vehicle tax rates. The public-health risks of diesel particulates have been well known since the days of Margaret Thatcher. However, the impact of nitrogen oxides and the scale of underestimated pollution from lab tests compounded by the sheer volume of cars has now become a public-health catastrophe. That’s why the demand for a new Clean Air Act grows. Meanwhile, the supreme court has demanded that the government produces a clean air strategy, to fulfil our EU air quality obligations. Today, I publish my clean air bill to give shape and ambition to the government’s plan. Britain needs to take bold leadership. We already know that four capital cities – Paris, Madrid, Athens and Mexico City – have plans to remove diesel vehicles by 2025 and that the markets are investing in zero-emissions futures. Tesla, founded in 2003, produces just 76,000 electric cars and is valued at $49bn (£38bn) – $3bn more than Ford, founded a century earlier, which produces 6.6m vehicles. The clean air bill is a route map to reach World Health Organization air quality standards by tackling emissions in our cities, ports and airports. It provides the signals and incentives for consumers and producers to change their behaviour to do so. Rather than penalising diesel car-owners who bought in good faith, the bill calls for recall and refit of cars, fiscal incentives and scrappage schemes largely funded by manufacturers for drivers to switch to vehicles that produce fewer – or ideally, zero – emissions. It provides for a national electric and hydrogen refuelling network and gives local authorities a responsibility to measure and publicise pollution levels, in particular close to vulnerable groups such as children and the elderly. Councils will have powers to restrict access or introduce pollution charges if communities so wish, based on local evidence. What’s more, new powers are proposed to combat diesel pollution belching into communities from idling ships in port by requiring a switch to port-provided electric power. The bill also addresses freight transport, pollution at airports and “cheat devices” installed on cars. Overall, the bill aims to make our right to clean air a reality. Our first duty as parents is to protect our children. Break time, walking to the shops and football in the park shouldn’t be life-or-death decisions beyond our control. They needn’t be. For the sake of all our children, let’s do something about it now.


Global Needle Free Drug Delivery Devices Market by Technologies, Applications, Growth Trends and Forecast to 2021, New Report by iHealthcareAnalyst, Inc. Needle Free Drug Delivery Devices Market by Technology (Jet Injectors, Novel Needle-Free Technology, Transdermal Patch Technology), and Applications (Diabetes, Paediatrics, Pain Management, Vaccination) and Forecast 2017-2021. Maryland Heights, MO, May 02, 2017 --( Browse Needle Free Drug Delivery Devices Market by Technology (Jet Injectors, Novel Needle-Free Technology, Transdermal Patch Technology), and Applications (Diabetes, Paediatrics, Pain Management, Vaccination) and Forecast 2017-2021 report at https://www.ihealthcareanalyst.com/report/needle-free-drug-delivery-devices-market/. The global needle free drug delivery devices market segmentation is based on technology (jet injectors, novel needle-free technology, transdermal patch technology), and its applications (diabetes, paediatrics, pain management, vaccination). The global needle free drug delivery devices market report provides market size (Revenue USD Million 2014 to 2021), market share and forecasts growth trends (CAGR%, 2017 to 2021). The global needle free drug delivery devices market report also provides the detailed market landscape (market drivers, restraints, opportunities), market attractiveness analysis and profiles of major competitors in the global market including company overview, financial snapshot, key products, technologies and services offered, and recent developments. The global needle free drug delivery devices market research report is further segmented by geography into North America (U.S., Canada), Latin America (Brazil, Mexico, Rest of LA), Europe (U.K., Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Rest of EU), Asia Pacific (Japan, China, India, Rest of APAC), and Rest of the World. Major players operating in the global needle free drug delivery devices market and included in this report are Antares Pharma, Inc., Glide Pharmaceutical Technologies Ltd., Injex Pharma AG, 3M, Pharmajet, and Zogenix, Inc. 1. Technology 1.1. Jet Injectors 1.2. Novel needle-free technology 1.3. Transdermal patch technology 2. Application 2.1. Diabetes 2.2. Paediatrics 2.3. Pain Management 2.4. Vaccination 2.5. Others 3. Geography (Region, Country) 3.1. North America (U.S., Canada) 3.2. Latin America (Brazil, Mexico, Rest of LA) 3.3. Europe (U.K., Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Rest of EU) 3.4. Asia Pacific (Japan, China, India, Rest of APAC) 3.5. Rest of the World 4. Company Profiles 4.1. 3M 4.2. Antares Pharma, Inc. 4.3. Glide Pharmaceutical Technologies Ltd. 4.4. Injex Pharma AG 4.5. Pharmajet, Inc. 4.6. Zogenix, Inc.   To request Table of Contents and Sample Pages of this report visit: https://www.ihealthcareanalyst.com/report/needle-free-drug-delivery-devices-market/ About Us iHealthcareAnalyst, Inc. is a global healthcare market research and consulting company providing market analysis, and competitive intelligence services to global clients. The company publishes syndicate, custom and consulting grade healthcare reports covering animal healthcare, biotechnology, clinical diagnostics, healthcare informatics, healthcare services, medical devices, medical equipment, and pharmaceuticals. In addition to multi-client studies, we offer creative consulting services and conduct proprietary single-client assignments targeted at client’s specific business objectives, information needs, time frame and budget. Please contact us to receive a proposal for a proprietary single-client study. Contact Us iHealthcareAnalyst, Inc. 2109, Mckelvey Hill Drive Maryland Heights, MO 63043 United States Email: sales@ihealthcareanalyst.com Website: https://www.ihealthcareanalyst.com Maryland Heights, MO, May 02, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Needle-free injection systems are novel ways to introduce various medicines into patients without piercing the skin with a conventional needle. A needle-free delivery device can deliver the drug either actively or passively is a rational alternative. Needle free drug delivery technology provides effective drug delivery for wide range of drugs; it is bioequivalent to syringe and needle and results in less pain. In the case of delivering the drug actively, a driving force is necessary for the transport of drug across the skin, which may be accomplished using jet injectors, electroporation, iontophoresis, ultrasound, powder injection, and tape stripping. Different delivery systems have been developed to deliver vaccine to the epidermal layer of skin.Browse Needle Free Drug Delivery Devices Market by Technology (Jet Injectors, Novel Needle-Free Technology, Transdermal Patch Technology), and Applications (Diabetes, Paediatrics, Pain Management, Vaccination) and Forecast 2017-2021 report at https://www.ihealthcareanalyst.com/report/needle-free-drug-delivery-devices-market/.The global needle free drug delivery devices market segmentation is based on technology (jet injectors, novel needle-free technology, transdermal patch technology), and its applications (diabetes, paediatrics, pain management, vaccination). The global needle free drug delivery devices market report provides market size (Revenue USD Million 2014 to 2021), market share and forecasts growth trends (CAGR%, 2017 to 2021).The global needle free drug delivery devices market report also provides the detailed market landscape (market drivers, restraints, opportunities), market attractiveness analysis and profiles of major competitors in the global market including company overview, financial snapshot, key products, technologies and services offered, and recent developments. The global needle free drug delivery devices market research report is further segmented by geography into North America (U.S., Canada), Latin America (Brazil, Mexico, Rest of LA), Europe (U.K., Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Rest of EU), Asia Pacific (Japan, China, India, Rest of APAC), and Rest of the World.Major players operating in the global needle free drug delivery devices market and included in this report are Antares Pharma, Inc., Glide Pharmaceutical Technologies Ltd., Injex Pharma AG, 3M, Pharmajet, and Zogenix, Inc.1. Technology1.1. Jet Injectors1.2. Novel needle-free technology1.3. Transdermal patch technology2. Application2.1. Diabetes2.2. Paediatrics2.3. Pain Management2.4. Vaccination2.5. Others3. Geography (Region, Country)3.1. North America (U.S., Canada)3.2. Latin America (Brazil, Mexico, Rest of LA)3.3. Europe (U.K., Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Rest of EU)3.4. Asia Pacific (Japan, China, India, Rest of APAC)3.5. Rest of the World4. Company Profiles4.1. 3M4.2. Antares Pharma, Inc.4.3. Glide Pharmaceutical Technologies Ltd.4.4. Injex Pharma AG4.5. Pharmajet, Inc.4.6. Zogenix, Inc.To request Table of Contents and Sample Pages of this report visit: https://www.ihealthcareanalyst.com/report/needle-free-drug-delivery-devices-market/About UsiHealthcareAnalyst, Inc. is a global healthcare market research and consulting company providing market analysis, and competitive intelligence services to global clients. The company publishes syndicate, custom and consulting grade healthcare reports covering animal healthcare, biotechnology, clinical diagnostics, healthcare informatics, healthcare services, medical devices, medical equipment, and pharmaceuticals.In addition to multi-client studies, we offer creative consulting services and conduct proprietary single-client assignments targeted at client’s specific business objectives, information needs, time frame and budget. Please contact us to receive a proposal for a proprietary single-client study.Contact UsiHealthcareAnalyst, Inc.2109, Mckelvey Hill DriveMaryland Heights, MO 63043United StatesEmail: sales@ihealthcareanalyst.comWebsite: https://www.ihealthcareanalyst.com


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Thailand has become the first Asian country to eliminate mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV, thanks to a pragmatic multi-sector response backed by strong political commitment and heavy government investment, a study published in Paediatrics and International Child Health reports. Such an early, concerted response allowed the country to successfully address the four prongs of the recommended World Health Organization (WHO) elimination strategy. As a result, MTCT rates were reduced from 20-40% in the mid-1990s to 1.9% in 2015 (surpassing the WHO elimination target of The WHO strategy focuses on the following four prongs: primary prevention of HIV in women of childbearing age; prevention of unintended pregnancies in women living with HIV; prevention of HIV transmission from an HIV-infected woman to her infant; and provision of appropriate treatment, care and support to women and children living with HIV. In Thailand, initiatives to promote condom use, provide information about the risk of transmission and introduce testing for pregnant and post-partum women were successfully implemented. For example, the 100% Condom Programme, which promotes 100% condom use by male patrons of commercial sex workers, has played a crucial role in preventing HIV infection in women of reproductive age. The success of such initiatives resulted in part from strong political leadership - the national AIDS policy of Thailand was transferred from the Ministry of Public Health to the Office of the Prime Minister in 1991 - and greatly increased investment, with government spending on the HIV/AIDS programme rising from US$684,000 in 1988 to US$82 million by 1997. The high rate of antenatal care provision in Thailand is also key. A voluntary HIV test with same-day results is offered at the first clinic visit, followed by re-testing later in pregnancy for HIV-negative women. For HIV-infected pregnant women, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is provided as soon as possible. Such treatment is now available at much lower cost, thanks to legislative changes which have allowed the non-commercial production of generic ART in Thailand. Counselling services at antenatal clinics also promote the use of dual methods of contraception to prevent unintended pregnancy in women with HIV. The study's author, Professor Usa Thisyakorn of Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok said: "Thailand has achieved WHO elimination of mother-to-child HIV transmission targets with early and concerted efforts of all sectors of Thai society. This provided numerous lessons learned in working together to safeguard children. Since children are the country's future, how the country responds to the problems created for them indicates how highly the country values its future." When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement: Please note the article will not be available online until the embargo has been lifted. Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life. As one of the world's leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine. From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues. For more information please contact: Sayjal Mistry, Press & Media Relations Coordinator email: newsroom@taylorandfrancis.com Follow us on Twitter: @tandfnewsroom Introducing Press Pass: journalist access to all Taylor & Francis Journal articles. Contact us for more details.


News Article | November 10, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Project led By University of Maryland School of Medicine will focus on accelerating the use of vaccines to protect from disease that kills more than 220,000 annually Baltimore, MD, November 10, 2016 - Typhoid fever, a bacterial infection that causes high fever and other disabling symptoms, remains a serious global problem in the developing world: it kills almost a quarter of a million people annually, and infects about 21 million. To help speed the introduction of, and access to, new and more effective typhoid vaccines, the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM) Center for Vaccine Development (CVD) has received a grant of $36.9 million from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The project, known as Typhoid Vaccine Acceleration Consortium (TyVAC), is a partnership with the Oxford Vaccine Group at the University of Oxford and PATH, an international nonprofit global health organization based in Seattle. TyVAC will focus on conjugate vaccines, which can trigger a stronger immune response in certain vulnerable populations, such as infants and children, than current typhoid vaccines. TyVAC will employ a multidisciplinary approach to study and control typhoid, and generate evidence that informs global policies. The project will work closely with governments and policymakers to introduce vaccines in lower-income countries with a high burden of typhoid. The effort will also examine how well the vaccine rollouts work in early adopter countries. The project's overall goal is to support accelerated, evidence-based decisions for new typhoid conjugate vaccine introductions that will significantly reduce the severe health and economic burdens of the disease. "Typhoid fever disproportionately impacts children and poor populations," said Kathleen Neuzil, MD, MPH, FIDSA, professor of medicine at UM SOM, director of CVD, and deputy director of the Institute for Global Health (IGH). "With our long history of work in typhoid and typhoid vaccines, we look forward to working with partners to catalyze action against this significant public health problem." "It is unconscionable that children are still dying by the thousands every year from diseases like typhoid that are completely preventable," said Anita Zaidi, director of the Enteric and Diarrheal Diseases team at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. "The prevention and control of typhoid should be a global health priority and we are pleased to support the Typhoid Vaccine Acceleration Consortium as part of our overall strategy to combat typhoid through an integrated approach including access to clean water, improved sanitation, and immunization." At present, the currently available vaccines for typhoid fever are underutilized despite the substantial disease burden and a World Health Organization recommendation for the use of typhoid vaccines in areas of high burden. Typhoid conjugate vaccines have the promise to overcome some of the barriers of the currently available vaccines, providing a stronger immune response, a longer duration of protection, and the ability to be incorporated into the routine vaccination schedule targeted at children less than two years old. "We are excited to work in partnership with CVD to bring our expertise on typhoid infections and vaccines to the consortium and improve health through TyVAC," said Andrew Pollard, MD, PhD, professor of pediatric infection and immunity at the University of Oxford, and director of the Oxford Vaccine Group. Population density, limited sanitation, and poor water quality can provide a breeding ground for typhoid. "With increasing urbanization, we could see an even greater burden of typhoid," noted Deborah Atherly, PhD, head of Policy, Access, and Introduction for PATH's Center for Vaccine Innovation and Access. "Through TyVAC, we will work to ensure that typhoid vaccines finally reach those who need them most." "Typhoid is a significant public health problem in many parts of the world," said UM SOM Dean E. Albert Reece, MD, PhD, MBA, who is also vice president for medical affairs at the University of Maryland and the John Z. and Akiko K. Bowers Distinguished Professor. "Over several decades, the CVD has helped save millions of lives. This generous grant from the Gates Foundation will allow our scientists, working with national and international partners, to continue with this crucial work." The CVD at the University of Maryland School of Medicine works nationally and internationally to prevent disease and save lives through the development and delivery of vaccines. As an academic research center, CVD is engaged in the full range of vaccinology, including basic science research, vaccine development, pre-clinical and clinical evaluation, and post-marketing field studies. Learn more at http://medschool. . The University of Maryland School of Medicine was chartered in 1807 and is the first public medical school in the United States and continues today as an innovative leader in accelerating innovation and discovery in medicine. The School of Medicine is the founding school of the University of Maryland and is an integral part of the 11-campus University System of Maryland. Located on the University of Maryland's Baltimore campus, the School of Medicine works closely with the University of Maryland Medical Center and Medical System to provide a research-intensive, academic and clinically based education. With 43 academic departments, centers and institutes and a faculty of more than 3,000 physicians and research scientists plus more than $400 million in extramural funding, the School is regarded as one of the leading biomedical research institutions in the U.S. with top-tier faculty and programs in cancer, brain science, surgery and transplantation, trauma and emergency medicine, vaccine development and human genomics, among other centers of excellence. The School is not only concerned with the health of the citizens of Maryland and the nation, but also has a global presence, with research and treatment facilities in more than 35 countries around the world. Learn more at http://medschool. . The University of Oxford is one of the top five higher education institutions in the world and hosts the Oxford Vaccine Group (OVG) in the Department of Paediatrics (http://www. ). OVG is a vaccine design, development, clinical trials, and laboratory evaluation research group with specific expertise in vaccine evaluation in paediatric populations. The University of Oxford has strategically made a major investment in infrastructure to support research on vaccines and immunity over the past two decades. The OVG is one of the largest academic research groups in the world focused on designing, developing, and evaluating vaccines for children, as well as characterizing immune response to vaccines and infectious diseases. PATH is the leader in global health innovation. An international nonprofit organization, we save lives and improve health, especially among women and children. We accelerate innovation across five platforms--vaccines, drugs, diagnostics, devices, and system and service innovations--that harness our entrepreneurial insight, scientific and public health expertise, and passion for health equity. By mobilizing partners around the world, we take innovation to scale, working alongside countries primarily in Africa and Asia to tackle their greatest health needs. Together, we deliver measurable results that disrupt the cycle of poor health. Learn more at http://www.


There is a substantial gap in knowledge of pharmacokinetic changes in pregnancy and their clinical consequences, according to a study published by Shinya Ito and colleagues from the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada, in PLOS Medicine. Pregnant women take a variety of medications, including prescription and over-the-counter medications, with more than 90% of women in some areas reporting use of at least one medication during pregnancy. However, information may not be available on whether or how to adjust dosing to compensate for the physiologic changes that occur during pregnancy. The researchers conducted a systematic review of the biomedical literature, and identified 198 studies, involving 121 different medications, that measured changes in pharmacokinetics (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs) during pregnancy and/or the resultant clinical impact of these changes. Across the different drug classes, they frequently observed a decrease in drug exposure mainly due to increased elimination. However, only a few studies described changes in clinical outcomes associated with altered pharmacokinetics during pregnancy. The authors say: "It is essential for clinicians to be aware of these unique pregnancy -related changes in pharmacokinetics, and to critically examine their potential clinical implications." The authors received no specific funding for this work. The authors have declared that no competing interests exist. Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Hospital Library, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Research Institute, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Department of Paediatrics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Department of Pharmacology & Toxicology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada IN YOUR COVERAGE PLEASE USE THIS URL TO PROVIDE ACCESS TO THE FREELY AVAILABLE PAPER: http://journals. LCC is supported by a National Institute for Health Research Professorship, RP-2014-05-019. AD is supported by the National Institute for Health Research University College London Hospitals Biomedical Research Centre. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. AD is Director and cofounder of Magnus Growth, part of Magnus Life Science, a company that is aiming to take to market a novel treatment for fetal growth restriction. Chappell LC, David AL (2016) Improving the Pipeline for Developing and Testing Pharmacological Treatments in Pregnancy. PLoS Med 13(11): e1002161. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1002161 IN YOUR COVERAGE PLEASE USE THIS URL TO PROVIDE ACCESS TO THE FREELY AVAILABLE PAPER: http://journals.


News Article | November 8, 2016
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Scientists from Children's Health Research Institute, a program of Lawson Health Research Institute, and Western University have developed a new blood test that identifies with greater than 90 per cent certainty whether or not an adolescent athlete has suffered a concussion. Diagnosis of a clinically significant concussion, or a mild traumatic brain injury, can be difficult as it currently relies on a combination of patient symptom assessment and clinician judgement. Equally problematic are the decisions to stop play or activities, or when patients who have suffered a concussion can safely return to normal activities without risking further injury. In the new study, researchers have demonstrated that a blood test can now accurately diagnose a concussion using a form of blood profiling known as metabolomics. Dr. Douglas Fraser, a physician in the Paediatric Critical Care Unit at Children's Hospital, London Health Sciences Centre and Lawson scientist, led the study with his co-investigator Mark Daley, a professor in the Departments of Computer Science, Biology and Statistics & Actuarial Sciences at Western University. In the relatively inexpensive test, blood is drawn from an individual that may have suffered a concussion as the result of a sudden blow to the head (or from transmitted forces from a sudden blow to the body) within 72 hours of the incident. The scientists measure a panel of metabolites -- small molecules that are the products of the body's metabolism -- in the blood to search for distinct patterns that indicate a concussion has occurred. "This novel approach, to use blood testing of metabolites as a diagnostic tool for concussions, was exploratory and we were extremely pleased with the robustness of our initial results," says Dr. Fraser, also an Associate Professor in Western's Departments of Paediatrics, Physiology & Pharmacology and Clinical Neurological Sciences at the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry. "We looked at a host of patterns and it appears that those who suffered a concussion have a very different pattern than those who have not had a concussion." This new method, fully funded by the Children's Health Foundation and conducted by the Western Concussion Study Group, is unique in that previous attempts have looked unsuccessfully for a single highly accurate protein biomarker that can distinguish concussed from non-concussed adolescent patients. In this latest successful attempt, the researchers took a different approach and investigated a full spectrum of 174 metabolites. "We looked at all of these metabolites in concussed male adolescent patients and in non-concussed male adolescent patients and it turns out that the spectrum is really different," explains Daley, who is also Western's Associate Vice-President (Research) and a principal investigator at Western's Brain & Mind Institute. "There is no one metabolite that we can put a finger on but when we looked at all of them, those profiles are different enough that we could easily distinguish concussed patients from non-concussed. In fact, with fine tuning we can now look at sets of as few as 20-40 specific metabolites and maintain the diagnostic accuracy level of the test over 90 per cent." Concussion is a major public health concern, often resulting in significant acute symptoms and in some individuals, long-term neurological dysfunction. "The discovery of a blood test that can aid in concussion diagnosis is very important," says Dr. Fraser. "With further research, we anticipate that our blood test will also aid clinicians in predicting concussion outcome, as well as aid rehabilitation after concussion." The findings were recently published in the international journal Metabolomics. The technology is subject to a patent application filed through WORLDiscoveries®, the joint technology transfer office of Lawson and Western. "This relatively quick and inexpensive blood test for concussion is by far the most accurate reported with tremendous potential for clinical management and commercialization," says Kirk Brown, Manager of Business Development for Lawson.


News Article | November 7, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

LONDON, ON - Scientists from Children's Health Research Institute, a program of Lawson Health Research Institute, and Western University have developed a new blood test that identifies with greater than 90 per cent certainty whether or not an adolescent athlete has suffered a concussion. Diagnosis of a clinically significant concussion, or a mild traumatic brain injury, can be difficult as it currently relies on a combination of patient symptom assessment and clinician judgement. Equally problematic are the decisions to stop play or activities, or when patients who have suffered a concussion can safely return to normal activities without risking further injury. In the new study, researchers have demonstrated that a blood test can now accurately diagnose a concussion using a form of blood profiling known as metabolomics. Dr. Douglas Fraser, a physician in the Paediatric Critical Care Unit at Children's Hospital, London Health Sciences Centre and Lawson scientist, led the study with his co-investigator Mark Daley, a professor in the Departments of Computer Science, Biology and Statistics & Actuarial Sciences at Western University. In the relatively inexpensive test, blood is drawn from an individual that may have suffered a concussion as the result of a sudden blow to the head (or from transmitted forces from a sudden blow to the body) within 72 hours of the incident. The scientists measure a panel of metabolites - small molecules that are the products of the body's metabolism - in the blood to search for distinct patterns that indicate a concussion has occurred. "This novel approach, to use blood testing of metabolites as a diagnostic tool for concussions, was exploratory and we were extremely pleased with the robustness of our initial results," says Dr. Fraser, also an Associate Professor in Western's Departments of Paediatrics, Physiology & Pharmacology and Clinical Neurological Sciences at the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry. "We looked at a host of patterns and it appears that those who suffered a concussion have a very different pattern than those who have not had a concussion." This new method, fully funded by the Children's Health Foundation and conducted by the Western Concussion Study Group, is unique in that previous attempts have looked unsuccessfully for a single highly accurate protein biomarker that can distinguish concussed from non-concussed adolescent patients. In this latest successful attempt, the researchers took a different approach and investigated a full spectrum of 174 metabolites. "We looked at all of these metabolites in concussed male adolescent patients and in non-concussed male adolescent patients and it turns out that the spectrum is really different," explains Daley, who is also Western's Associate Vice-President (Research) and a principal investigator at Western's renowned Brain & Mind Institute. "There is no one metabolite that we can put a finger on but when we looked at all of them, those profiles are different enough that we could easily distinguish concussed patients from non-concussed. In fact, with fine tuning we can now look at sets of as few as 20-40 specific metabolites and maintain the diagnostic accuracy level of the test over 90 per cent." Concussion is a major public health concern, often resulting in significant acute symptoms and in some individuals, long-term neurological dysfunction. "The discovery of a blood test that can aid in concussion diagnosis is very important," says Dr. Fraser. "With further research, we anticipate that our blood test will also aid clinicians in predicting concussion outcome, as well as aid rehabilitation after concussion." The findings were recently published in the international journal Metabolomics. The technology is subject to a patent application filed through WORLDiscoveries®, the joint technology transfer office of Lawson and Western. "This relatively quick and inexpensive blood test for concussion is by far the most accurate reported with tremendous potential for clinical management and commercialization," says Kirk Brown, Manager of Business Development for Lawson. Western delivers an academic experience second to none. Since 1878, The Western Experience has combined academic excellence with life-long opportunities for intellectual, social and cultural growth in order to better serve our communities. Our research excellence expands knowledge and drives discovery with real-world application. Western attracts individuals with a broad worldview, seeking to study, influence and lead in the international community. As the research institute of London Health Sciences Centre and St. Joseph's Health Care London, and working in partnership with Western University, Lawson Health Research Institute is committed to furthering scientific knowledge to advance health care around the world. http://www. Children's Health Foundation is dedicated to raising and granting funds to support Children's Hospital at London Health Sciences Centre, Thames Valley Children's Centre and Children's Health Research Institute. Since 1922, funds raised have helped deliver exceptional care and support for children and their families by providing specialized paediatric care, equipment, education programs, therapy, rehabilitation services and research. Get to know how you can help save and improve kids' lives at http://www.


News Article | January 17, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Popular baby chew toy Sophie, the Giraffe was reportedly found with mold growing inside it. The incident was reported first by paediatric dentist, Dana Chianese. Chew toys or a teether is a baby toy made generally out of rubber. It is used as a soothing tool for teething infants. Chianese told Goodhousekeeping that she used to recommend Sophie, the Giraffe, as a teething toy to parents but not anymore. What changed her mind you wonder? About a month ago Dana noticed musty smelling air coming out of the toy, which her children prefer to play with. "I decided to cut into Sophie out of curiosity and discovered a science experiment living inside. Smelly, ugly mold living in my infant's favorite chew toy!," shared Chianese with the publication. Chianese states that she cleans the toy strictly following the instructions given by the company, using soapy hot water and applying it on the toy with a damp sponge.  Dana claims to have never put the toy in water completely for cleaning purposes. Allegations against Sophie, the Giraffe, is not an isolated incident. Stephanie Opera, a concerned mother, also reviewed the product on Amazon and tried to warn other parents about the teething toy through her review. "Beware!! If you have a drooly baby, moisture will get in the hole and you'll end up with mold! We've had ours for two years and the entire inside is coated with black mold!" wrote Stephanie on Amazon. A What to Expect user, also found mold inside the toy. On hearing news that the toy's legs get caught in babies' throat, the user consulted with her DH and decided to chop off the legs. It could be safely assumed that she was not expecting to see mold inside the toy. While parents are panicking over the fact that mold has been found inside a teether frequently used by infants, Dr. Luba Konopasek, an Assistant Professor of Paediatrics at New York Presbyterian and Weil Cornell Medical Center asks parents not to get too alarmed. Dr. Konopasek told care.com that parents need not get too anxious about the mold situation, until and unless their child has an immune disorder like mold allergy. In that case it is safe to say, keep the child away from Sophie. Carolyn Forte, director of Cleaning Lab suggests that parents clean and thoroughly dry the plastic toys to prevent the growth of mold inside them. Laurie Schraenen, a spokeswoman for Sophie the Giraffe recently issued a statement on being contacted by Good Housekeeping. In the statement, Schraenen clearly stated that Sophie the Giraffe was made out of 100% natural rubber and the company recommends cleaning the toy, strictly abiding by the instructions given by the company. The company has promised it will look into the matter seriously and will conduct further examination to reach to the bottom of the matter. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


- El taller patrocinado por Ascensia Diabetes Care en ISPAD 2016 destaca la importancia de la tecnología digital para apoyar el autotratamiento de la diabetes en pediatría y adolescentes Hoy, en un taller organizado por Ascensia Diabetes Care, un reconocido panel de expertos destacó la importancia de la tecnología digital para apoyar el auto-tratamiento de la diabetes en pediatría y adolescentes. El taller se llevó a cabo en el 42 encuentro anual de la International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD), que está teniendo lugar del 26 al 29 de octubre de 2016 en Valencia (España). El evento, titulado "Smart Diabetes Self-Management in Paediatrics and Adolescents in the Digital Age", examina el uso de las tecnologías digitales y salud móvil para apoyar el auto-tratamiento de la diabetes en los niños. Concluyó que la tecnología móvil tiene un importante potencial para apoyar el auto-tratamiento en esta importante población. Sin embargo, la calidad y precisión de las herramientas de salud móvil en la diabetes se destacaron como consideraciones importantes. Hay muchas herramientas que están actualmente disponibles en el mercado y es importante identificar las aplicaciones de salud móvil que son seguras y fiables para el tratamiento de niños y adolescentes con diabetes. Presidiendo el taller, el doctor Henk Veeze, director médico internacional senior en Diabeter and Immediate Past Treasurer de ISPAD, explicó: "Sabemos que la diabetes puede ser difícil de tratar a cualquier edad, pero es particularmente complicado para los jóvenes, ya que están creciendo. Estos retos pueden afectar significativamente a su salud y conducir a complicaciones y pobres resultados. Las herramientas digitales y dispositivos móviles tienen el potencial de mejorar significativamente la gestión de la diabetes para los jóvenes y sus padres, ayudando a seguir la condición, ofreciendo información accionable y apoyando el auto-tratamiento". El taller incluyó presentaciones de Javier Ferrero, director de información de la Agencia Andaluza de Calidad Asistencial en España, y el doctor David Montes, endocrinólogo pediátrico sénior del Hospital de Fuenlabrada en España. "El objetivo de las nuevas tecnologías digitales en la diabetes es mejorar el control metabólico de los niños, y las aplicaciones desempeñan un papel importante en este objetivo apoyando a los niños y a sus padres en la toma de decisiones. Es por tanto esencial que mejoremos las herramientas digitales que están disponibles para ellos. Los pacientes infantiles y sus padres necesitan herramientas y aplicaciones móviles efectivas y precisas que apoyen el auto-tratamiento", explicó el doctor David Montes. En relación con los estándares y regulaciones para las tecnologías de aplicaciones móviles en la diabetes, Javier Ferrero añadió: "Las aplicaciones de diabetes tienen el enorme potencial de cambiar drásticamente las conductas y hábitos de los pacientes, empoderándoles a gestionar mejor su enfermedad. Sin embargo, muchas aplicaciones de diabetes no cumplen los estándares de mejores prácticas de las tecnologías digitales modernas. Por ejemplo, las aplicaciones no seguras suponen un riesgo muy importante en las manos de los pacientes más jóvenes que no tienen la capacidad de diferenciar entre aplicaciones fiables y valiosas. La regulación y la vigilancia del mercado deben mejorarse de manera urgente para garantizar la seguridad del paciente". ISPAD quiere promover la ciencia clínica y básica, la investigación, la educación y el derecho en la diabetes en niños y adolescentes, y es la única sociedad internacional centrada específicamente en todos los tipos de diabetes infantil. El tema del encuentro 2016 se basa en la educación y en las nuevas tecnologías para mejorar el cuidado de la diabetes. Michael Kloss, consejero delegado de Ascensia Diabetes Care, dijo: "Estamos muy contentos de asistir a la Conferencia anual de ISPAD 2016 y ofrecer este taller educativo sobre la importancia de las tecnologías digitales para apoyar la atención de la diabetes infantil. Como socio de confianza en la comunidad de la diabetes, estamos dedicados a apoyar la educación sobre este tema crucial". ISPAD 2016 también coincide con el lanzamiento de los sistemas de monitorización de la glucosa en sangre CONTOUR®NEXT ONE y CONTOUR®PLUS ONE por Ascensia Diabetes Care en Europa. Cada sistema incluye un medidor inalámbrico y fácil de utilizar que se vincula sin fisuras a un dispositivo móvil inteligente a través de la conectividad Bluetooth®. Los datos que se capturan sin esfuerzo por la aplicación CONTOUR® DIABETES pueden evaluarse para tendencias en los niveles de glucosa sanguínea y ofrecen información accionable. Michael Kloss añadió: "La aplicación CONTOUR DIABETES habilita patrones y tendencias en los niveles de glucosa en sangre en niños con diabetes que deben mostrarse a los mismos niños, a sus padres y a sus médicos. Esto puede ayudar a apoyar el auto-tratamiento por toda la familia y el equipo sanitario".

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