Packaging Brody Inc.

Duluth, GA, United States

Packaging Brody Inc.

Duluth, GA, United States
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Brody A.L.,Packaging Brody Inc. | Brody A.L.,University of Georgia
Food Technology | Year: 2011

Micro-oxygen technologies that are used to reduce oxygen extending shelf life of foods are presented. Micro-oxygen processing uses the oxygen levels in both the product and the processing environment that would reduce biochemical reactions to levels, which are too low to be measured by conventional methods as in beer or juice beverage preservation. Several methods have been implemented to reduce polyphenol oxidase (PPO) that includes inactivation by heating to destroy oxidative enzymes, application of ascorbic acid as an oxygen interceptor, and reduction of oxygen by vacuum or by inert gas flushing in the juice and wine industries. Micro-oxygen processing decreases dissolved oxygen to 48 ppb at the moment of processing compared to 660 ppb of dissolved oxygen in orange juice processed at atmospheric conditions, which may result in extension of shelf life in addition to better retention of ascorbic acid content.


Brody A.L.,Packaging Brody Inc. | Brody A.L.,University of Georgia
Food Technology | Year: 2010

Food packaging manufacturers are focusing on semi-rigid plastic, which is lighter weight and less expensive and has lower energy requirements in manufacturing, distribution, and functionalities meeting the protection and distribution needs. Semi-rigid packaging such as paperboard packaging cartons, bag-in-box, and plastic bottles and jars are shifting gradually toward flexible plastic films as in stretch film pallet wrapping, shrink film bundle wrapping for distribution trays, and stand-up pouches. The number of beverages that are hot filled and now filled into stand-up flexible pouches is growing. Several major brands such as Ritz and Wheat Thins are now found in stand-up pouches. The zipper and the slide have added to consumer convenience and made possible the growth of foods such as shredded cheese. Both vacuum skin packaging (VSP) and skin packaging have re-entered into the market to provide easy slide-out/leak-resistant packaging.


Brody A.L.,Packaging Brody Inc. | Brody A.L.,University of Georgia
Food Technology | Year: 2010

Active packaging plays exciting niche roles in a variety of food packaging. Flavor Absorbers are usually activated carbon or cyclodextrins designed to remove trivial quantities of undesirable odors, but hardly applied on a commercial basis. Carbon dioxide scavengers remove excess carbon dioxide from foods in which it can be damaging as with roasted and ground coffee and some fruits and vegetables. Calcium oxide reacts with carbon dioxide to remove it from the atmosphere. A flood of natural and other chemicals have been proposed to counter the growth of spoilage, infectious, and toxin-producing microorganisms that are ubiquitous in and on foods and their environments. Virtually the first commercial active packaging was silica gel in a porous sachet or mini-canister placed in a hermetically sealed pouch or jar to remove residual water and/or water vapor.


Brody A.L.,Packaging Brody Inc. | Brody A.L.,University of Georgia
Food Technology | Year: 2010

Many inorganic and organic materials can be converted into nano scale to exhibit beneficial characteristics, but only a relatively few are in the commercially economical range. The most studied nanocomposites to date in the commercial world are montmorillonite clay (MMT), kaolinite, carbon tubes, and graphene. Starch-clay composites are claimed to be biodegradable nanocomposites in which the MMT clay functions to reduce water vapor transmission through the hydrophilic starch matrix. Zinc oxide nanoparticles functioned as the tortuous path particles after stabilization by carboxymethylcellulose. The most suitable package material is polylactic acid (PLA), which is derived from corn starch. Combining the nano identification with nano transmitters that have been demonstrated at Georgia Tech, the concept of foodborne microbial signaling could be feasible. At the University of Georgia Dept. of Food Science and Technology, Professor Jake Mulligan has been performing research on modified nanoparticles for trapping microorganisms and even lysing their membranes to block their passage.


Brody A.L.,Packaging Brody Inc. | Brody A.L.,University of Georgia
Food Technology | Year: 2011

Retort Packaging is making new inroads into the food packaging industry meeting the demands of the customers. Retort describes a mechanical means to elevate food product temperature to above 100°C in order to facilitate the in-package thermal destruction of microbiological spores and thus effectively sterilize the contained food product. Retorts, or steam or water pressure vessels, are applied for treatments of low-acid foods in which low acid is defined as having water activity of 0.85 or above and a pH of 4.6 or above. Another class of wet foods that is canned includes those that are high acid, with a pH below 4.6, mostly fruit and tomato products, usually devoid of pathogenic heat-resistant microorganisms. Another class of wetfoods that is canned includes those that are high acid, with a pH below 4.6, mostly fruit and tomato products, usually devoid of pathogenic heat-resistant microorganisms. The crystallized polyester, silicon oxide, cobalt-catalyzed oxygen scavengers, and liquid crystal polymer oxygen barrier structures have emerged significantly in the food packaging industry.


Brody A.L.,Packaging Brody Inc.
Food Technology | Year: 2011

Advantages of ultra high pressure processing (HPP) of foods include instant uniform treatment of the food independent of package size or shape, food product composition, structure, or particulate size and shape. Capital equipment and its operational variable costs are not inexpensive, and to date, that has been a significant deterrent to more widespread application of the technologies associated with ultra high pressure processing. Gas and moisture barrier properties are usually the most important attributes that package materials and structures must exhibit for product protection and so must be the most closely monitored, particularly since they have been demonstrated to be subject to adverse change during some HPP operations. The volume reduction of the voids present in the polymer which takes place during the high pressure treatment could be responsible for a decrease in solubility and a much slower molecular diffusion through the polymer matrix.


Brody A.L.,Packaging Brody Inc. | Brody A.L.,University of Georgia
Food Technology | Year: 2011

Several advances undertaken in the field of microwave pasteurization and sterilization are presented. Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Team Goldblith (Sam) demonstrated that the microbiological effects of microwaves were wholly thermal. Several companies manufactured about 100 multiphase microwave plus hot air chambers that were initially applied for pasteurization combined with chilled distribution for safe delivery of products such as wet pastas. Microwave generators are situated near the entry to heat the interiors, and steam/hot air is present following the microwave radiation to temper the total food mass temperature. Most of the food product mass in its hermetically sealed barrier plastic trays has been heated to near 100°C when it leaves the proximity of the microwave energy. The external hot environment heats by conduction to ensure that the entire interior food mass are tempered to a pasteurization level.


Brody A.L.,Packaging Brody Inc. | Brody A.L.,University of Georgia
Food Technology | Year: 2011

Sessions, posters, and exhibits at the 2011 Annual Meeting & Food Expo, held in New Orleans, US, in June 2011, highlighted packaging ideas and innovations. A symposium on 'Latest Developments in Polymeric Film Packaging for Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Products' featured Clemson University's Kay Cooksey who provided information about modified atmosphere packaging of fresh and fresh-cut produce. Her presentation combined biopolymers, microperforation, coatings, and the popular active packaging with mathematical modeling to optimize material and structural selection. Poster sessions also provided significant information on important packaging issues and topics discussed included antimicrobial properties of wine grapes; antimicrobial chitosan or gallic acid films and electrospinning chitosan fibers. Some other significant poster session topics included controlled release packaging including antimicrobials such as the pungent AIT and nanotechnology in food packaging.


Brody A.L.,Food Technology | Brody A.L.,Packaging Brody Inc. | Brody A.L.,University of Georgia
Food Technology | Year: 2010

Several events during IFT's 2010 Annual Meeting and Food Expo showcased some of the best talents and developments in the field of food packaging. Kay Cooksey, Cryovac Chair of Food Packaging at Clemson University's packaging department, was honored with the 2010 Riester-Davis award for significant lifetime achievement in food packaging. ConAgra was honored with the 2010 award winner for a micro-waveable package for frozen dinners. The package used microwave energy to generate steam within the fluid and solids and fluid flow to thaw the liquid, while thawing and uniformly heating the solid mass to elevate the combined mass to serving temperature quickly. Ultraseptics demonstrated the scientific process that induced validation of continuous thermal sterilization devices that traveled through the system and record and transmitted time-temperature cycles to prove sterilization.


Chen J.,University of Georgia | Brody A.L.,Packaging Brody Inc.
Food Control | Year: 2013

Antimicrobial packaging appears to be a promising application of active food packaging technology. This project was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of selected antimicrobial packaging structures in improving the microbial quality of a ready-to-eat (RTE) meat product. Cooked ham samples (25 g) inoculated with a five-strain mixture of Listeria monocytogenes (2 or 4 log CFU g -1) were packaged into three different antimicrobial packaging structures, respectively, and samples in the non-antimicrobial packaging structure served as controls. The samples were stored at 4, 10, or 22 °C, and populations of total aerobic bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, and inoculated L. monocytogenes were determined twice a week over a 4 w storage period. Packaging structures with an O 2 scavenger or a CO 2 generator were more effective than the structure with an allyl isothiocyanate (AIT) generator. Listeria populations in the packaging structure with the O 2 scavenger were 1.80-2.65, 3.69-4.76, and 4.62-4.67 log CFU g -1 lower than the controls at 4, 10, or 22 °C. Samples in the packaging structure with the CO 2 generator were 1.11-1.63, 4.30-4.45, and 4.01-4.44 log CFU g -1 lower than the controls at 4, 10, or 22 °C. Significant inhibitions on total aerobic bacteria and Enterobacteriaceae counts were also observed in packaging structures with the CO 2 generator and O 2 scavenger. However, packaging structures with the AIT generator only significantly inhibited L. monocytogenes, total aerobic bacteria, and Enterobacteriaceae in some samples, mainly those stored at 22 °C. These results suggest that some of the evaluated packaging structures can effectively control bacterial populations, particularly Listeria populations on RTE meat products. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

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