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Yang Z.,Pacific Reproductive Center | Salem S.A.,Pacific Reproductive Center | Liu X.,Beijing Jia En Of Yun Hospital | Kuang Y.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | And 2 more authors.
Molecular Cytogenetics | Year: 2013

Background: In assisted reproductive treatments, embryos remaining after fresh embryo transfer are usually selected for cryopreservation based on traditional morphology assessment. Our previous report has demonstrated that array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) screening for IVF patients with good prognosis significantly improves clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates in fresh embryo transfer cycles. The current study further investigates the efficiency of applying aCGH in the selection of euploid embryos for cryopreservation as related to pregnancy and implantation outcomes in subsequent frozen embryo transfer (FET) cycles. Methods. First-time IVF patients with good prognosis undergoing fresh single embryo transfer and having at least one remaining blastocyst for cryopreservation were prospectively randomized into two groups: 1) Group A patients had embryos assessed by morphology first and then by aCGH screening of trophectoderm cells and 2) Group B patients had embryos evaluated by morphology alone. All patients had at least one blastocyst available for cryopreservation after fresh embryo transfer. There were 15 patients in Group A and 23 patients in Group B who failed to conceive after fresh embryo transfer and completed the FET cycles. Blastocyst survival and implantation rates were compared between the two groups. Results: There were no significant differences in blastocyst survival rates between Group A and Group B (90.9% vs. 91.3%, respectively; p >0.05). However, a significantly higher implantation rate was observed in the morphology assessment plus aCGH screening group compared to the morphology assessment alone group (65.0% vs. 33.3%, respectively; p = 0.038). There was no miscarriage observed in Group A while a 16.7% miscarriage rate was recorded in Group B (0% vs. 16.7%, respectively; p >0.05). Conclusions: While aCGH screening has been recently applied to select euploid blastocysts for fresh transfer in young, low-risk IVF patients, this is the first prospective study on the impact of aCGH specifically on blastocyst survival and implantation outcomes in the subsequent FET cycles of IVF patients with good prognosis. The present study demonstrates that aCGH screening of blastocysts prior to cryopreservation significantly improves implantation rates and may reduce the risk of miscarriage in subsequent FET cycles. Further randomized clinical studies with a larger sample size are needed to validate these preliminary findings. © 2013 Yang et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Yang Z.,Pacific Reproductive Center | Yang Z.,New Hope Fertility Center | Yang Z.,Jia En Of Yun Hospital | Yang Z.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | And 7 more authors.
BMC Medical Genomics | Year: 2014

Background: Recent advances in time-lapse monitoring in IVF treatment have provided new morphokinetic markers for embryonic competence. However, there is still very limited information about the relationship between morphokinetic parameters, chromosomal compositions and implantation potential. Accordingly, this study aimed at investigating the effects of selecting competent blastocysts for transfer by combining time-lapse monitoring and array CGH testing on pregnancy and implantation outcomes for patients undergoing preimplantation genetic screening (PGS). Methods. A total of 1163 metaphase II (MII) oocytes were retrieved from 138 PGS patients at a mean age of 36.6 ± 2.4 years. These sibling MII oocytes were then randomized into two groups after ICSI: 1) Group A, oocytes (n = 582) were cultured in the time-lapse system and 2) Group B, oocytes (n = 581) were cultured in the conventional incubator. For both groups, whole genomic amplification and array CGH testing were performed after trophectoderm biopsy on day 5. One to two euploid blastocysts within the most predictive morphokinetic parameters (Group A) or with the best morphological grade available (Group B) were selected for transfer to individual patients on day 6. Ongoing pregnancy and implantation rates were compared between the two groups. Results: There were significant differences in clinical pregnancy rates between Group A and Group B (71.1% vs. 45.9%, respectively, p = 0.037). The observed implantation rate per embryo transfer significantly increased in Group A compared to Group B (66.2% vs. 42.4%, respectively, p = 0.011). Moreover, a significant increase in ongoing pregnancy rates was also observed in Group A compared to Group B (68.9% vs. 40.5%. respectively, p = 0.019). However, there was no significant difference in miscarriage rate between the time-lapse system and the conventional incubator (3.1% vs. 11.8%, respectively, p = 0.273). Conclusions: This is the first prospective investigation using sibling oocytes to evaluate the efficiency of selecting competent blastocysts for transfer by combining time-lapse monitoring and array CGH testing for PGS patients. Our data clearly demonstrate that the combination of these two advanced technologies to select competent blastocysts for transfer results in improved implantation and ongoing pregnancy rates for PGS patients. © 2014 Yang et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


PubMed | Shanghai JiaoTong University, New Hope Fertility Center, ZytoGen Global Genetics Institute, Hospital Conde S Januario and 3 more.
Type: | Journal: BMC medical genomics | Year: 2015

Recent advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) have provided new methods for preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) of human embryos from in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles. However, there is still limited information about clinical applications of NGS in IVF and PGS (IVF-PGS) treatments. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of NGS screening on clinical pregnancy and implantation outcomes for PGS patients in comparison to array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) screening.This study was performed in two phases. Phase I study evaluated the accuracy of NGS for aneuploidy screening in comparison to aCGH. Whole-genome amplification (WGA) products (n=164) derived from previous IVF-PGS cycles (n=38) were retrospectively analyzed with NGS. The NGS results were then compared with those of aCGH. Phase II study further compared clinical pregnancy and implantation outcomes between NGS and aCGH for IVF-PGS patients. A total of 172 patients at mean age 35.23.5 years were randomized into two groups: 1) NGS (Group A): patients (n=86) had embryos screened with NGS and 2) aCGH (Group B): patients (n=86) had embryos screened with aCGH. For both groups, blastocysts were vitrified after trophectoderm biopsy. One to two euploid blastocysts were thawed and transferred to individual patients primarily based on the PGS results. Ongoing pregnancy and implantation rates were compared between the two study groups.NGS detected all types of aneuploidies of human blastocysts accurately and provided a 100 % 24-chromosome diagnosis consistency with the highly validated aCGH method. Moreover, NGS screening identified euploid blastocysts for transfer and resulted in similarly high ongoing pregnancy rates for PGS patients compared to aCGH screening (74.7 % vs. 69.2 %, respectively, p >0.05). The observed implantation rates were also comparable between the NGS and aCGH groups (70.5 % vs. 66.2 %, respectively, p >0.05).While NGS screening has been recently introduced to assist IVF patients, this is the first randomized clinical study on the efficiency of NGS for preimplantation genetic screening in comparison to aCGH. With the observed high accuracy of 24-chromosome diagnosis and the resulting high ongoing pregnancy and implantation rates, NGS has demonstrated an efficient, robust high-throughput technology for PGS.


Liu J.,Beijing Jia En Of Yun Hospital | Sills E.S.,Pacific Reproductive Center | Yang Z.,Pacific Reproductive Center | Salem S.A.,Pacific Reproductive Center | And 4 more authors.
Clinical and Experimental Reproductive Medicine | Year: 2012

Objective: During IVF, non-transferred embryos are usually selected for cryopreservation on the basis of morphological criteria. This investigation evaluated an application for array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) in assessment of surplus embryos prior to cryopreservation. Methods: First-time IVF patients undergoing elective single embryo transfer and having at least one extra non-transferred embryo suitable for cryopreservation were offered enrollment in the study. Patients were randomized into two groups: Patients in group A (n=55) had embryos assessed first by morphology and then by aCGH, performed on cells obtained from trophectoderm biopsy on post-fertilization day 5. Only euploid embryos were designated for cryopreservation. Patients in group B (n=48) had embryos assessed by morphology alone, with only good morphology embryos considered suitable for cryopreservation. Results: Among biopsied embryos in group A (n=425), euploidy was confirmed in 226 (53.1%). After fresh single embryo transfer, 64 (28.3%) surplus euploid embryos were cryopreserved for 51 patients (92.7%). In group B, 389 good morphology blastocysts were identified and a single top quality blastocyst was selected for fresh transfer. All group B patients (48/48) had at least one blastocyst remaining for cryopreservation. A total of 157 (40.4%) blastocysts were frozen in this group, a significantly larger proportion than was cryopreserved in group A (p=0.017, by chi-squared analysis). Conclusion: While aCGH and subsequent frozen embryo transfer are currently used to screen embryos, this is the first investigation to quantify the impact of aCGH specifically on embryo cryopreservation. Incorporation of aCGH screening significantly reduced the total number of cryopreserved blastocysts compared to when suitability for freezing was determined by morphology only. IVF patients should be counseled that the benefits of aCGH screening will likely come at the cost of sharply limiting the number of surplus embryos available for cryopreservation. © 2012. The Korean Society For Reproductive 52 Medicine.


Dunlap B.,Northwestern University | Shelke K.,Corvus Blue LLC | Salem S.A.,Pacific Reproductive Center | Keith L.G.,Northwestern University
Journal of Experimental and Clinical Assisted Reproduction | Year: 2011

This article presents data on the current best evidence-based clinical practices and controversies surrounding folic acid supplementation/fortification for the prevention of neural tube defects (NTDs) during early pregnancy. Formatted as a series of ten clinical questions, answers and extensive discussion are provided for each point. We assess the history and evidence behind supplementation and fortification, racial/ethnic disparities in NTDs on a global scale, and present information on risk factors for NTDs other than dietary folic acid deficiency. Also discussed are public health challenges, including disparities in NTD rates, population-wide monitoring of NTDs, and tracking safety data in the post-fortification era. Emerging data are also reviewed regarding the role folic acid may play in malignant processes, cardiovascular disease, male fertility, and other medical conditions. © 2011 Dunlap et al.


Sills E.S.,Pacific Reproductive Center | Yang Z.,Pacific Reproductive Center | Walsh D.J.,Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland | Salem S.A.,Pacific Reproductive Center
Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics | Year: 2012

Purpose The unacceptable multiple gestation rate currently associated with in vitro fertilization (IVF) would be substantially alleviated if the routine practice of transferring more than one embryo were reconsidered. While transferring a single embryo is an effective method to reduce the clinical problem of multiple gestation, rigid adherence to this approach has been criticized for negatively impacting clinical pregnancy success in IVF. In general, single embryo transfer is viewed cautiously by IVF patients although greater acceptance would result from a more effective embryo selection method. Methods Selection of one embryo for fresh transfer on the basis of chromosomal normalcy should achieve the dual objective of maintaining satisfactory clinical pregnancy rates and minimizing the multiple gestation problem, because embryo aneuploidy is a major contributing factor in implantation failure and miscarriage in IVF. The initial techniques for preimplantation genetic screening unfortunately lacked sufficient sensitivity and did not yield the expected results in IVF. However, newer molecular genetic methods could be incorporated with standard IVF to bring the goal of single embryo transfer within reach. Results Aiming to make multiple embryo transfers obsolete and unnecessary, and recognizing that array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) will typically require an additional 12 h of laboratory time to complete, we propose adopting aCGH for mainstream use in clinical IVF practice. Conclusion As aCGH technology continues to develop and becomes increasingly available at lower cost, it may soon be considered unusual for IVF laboratories to select a single embryo for fresh transfer without regard to its chromosomal competency. In this report, we provide a rationale supporting aCGH as the preferred methodology to provide a comprehensive genetic assessment of the single embryo before fresh transfer in IVF. The logistics and cost of integrating aCGH with IVF to enable fresh embryo transfer are also discussed. © Springer-Verlag 2012.


Salem S.A.,Pacific Reproductive Center | Peck A.C.,HRC Fertility Encino | Salem R.D.,Pacific Reproductive Center | Scott Sills E.,Pacific Reproductive Center | Scott Sills E.,University of Westminster
Clinical and Experimental Obstetrics and Gynecology | Year: 2014

Objective: This report describes a successful surgical approach to multiple in vitro fertilization (IVF) failures in the setting of hydrosalpinges, which had been previously treated with Essure inserts. Materials and Methods: A non-smoking 33-year-old Caucasian G2 P0020 (body mass index: BMI = 22) attended for second opinion. Her history was significant for bilateral hydrosalpinges having been noted on hysterosalpingogram two years earlier. This was managed by hysteroscopic placement of Essure inserts bilaterally. One year later, and now with Essure in situ, the patient completed three IVF cycles elsewhere. Her first and third IVF attempts resulted in biochemical pregnancy, while human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) was negative after the second cycle. Upon presentation at the authors' center and before beginning a fourth IVF cycle, further testing and surgical removal of the Essure devices was recommended. Results: Repeat hysteroscopy was unremarkable; laparoscopic bilateral salpingectomy and extirpation of Essure implants was accomplished without difficulty. Following menses, the patient initiated IVF with three embryos transferred. At day 60, a single intrauterine pregnancy was identified with positive cardiac activity (rate >100/min). Her obstetrical course was uneventful; a healthy 4,195 gram male infant was delivered (breech) by Cesarean at 40 weeks' gestation. Conclusion: Essure inserts comprise inner fibers of polyethylene terephthalate, a stainless steel coil, and a nickel-titanium coil. The product received FDA approval as a contraceptive in 2002 although its use for hydrosalpinx remains off-label. While successful outcomes with IVF following Essure placement have been reported, this is the first description of pregnancy and delivery from IVF after Essure removal. Essure may be considered for sterilization when laparoscopy is contraindicated, but experience with its use specifically for treating hydrosalpinges before IVF is limited. This observed association between prior poor IVF outcomes and Essure with subsequent delivery after surgical Essure removal is the first of its kind to be reported, and warrants further investigation.


Recent advances in time-lapse monitoring in IVF treatment have provided new morphokinetic markers for embryonic competence. However, there is still very limited information about the relationship between morphokinetic parameters, chromosomal compositions and implantation potential. Accordingly, this study aimed at investigating the effects of selecting competent blastocysts for transfer by combining time-lapse monitoring and array CGH testing on pregnancy and implantation outcomes for patients undergoing preimplantation genetic screening (PGS).A total of 1163 metaphase II (MII) oocytes were retrieved from 138 PGS patients at a mean age of 36.6 2.4 years. These sibling MII oocytes were then randomized into two groups after ICSI: 1) Group A, oocytes (n = 582) were cultured in the time-lapse system and 2) Group B, oocytes (n = 581) were cultured in the conventional incubator. For both groups, whole genomic amplification and array CGH testing were performed after trophectoderm biopsy on day 5. One to two euploid blastocysts within the most predictive morphokinetic parameters (Group A) or with the best morphological grade available (Group B) were selected for transfer to individual patients on day 6. Ongoing pregnancy and implantation rates were compared between the two groups.There were significant differences in clinical pregnancy rates between Group A and Group B (71.1% vs. 45.9%, respectively, p = 0.037). The observed implantation rate per embryo transfer significantly increased in Group A compared to Group B (66.2% vs. 42.4%, respectively, p = 0.011). Moreover, a significant increase in ongoing pregnancy rates was also observed in Group A compared to Group B (68.9% vs. 40.5%. respectively, p = 0.019). However, there was no significant difference in miscarriage rate between the time-lapse system and the conventional incubator (3.1% vs. 11.8%, respectively, p = 0.273).This is the first prospective investigation using sibling oocytes to evaluate the efficiency of selecting competent blastocysts for transfer by combining time-lapse monitoring and array CGH testing for PGS patients. Our data clearly demonstrate that the combination of these two advanced technologies to select competent blastocysts for transfer results in improved implantation and ongoing pregnancy rates for PGS patients.


In assisted reproductive treatments, embryos remaining after fresh embryo transfer are usually selected for cryopreservation based on traditional morphology assessment. Our previous report has demonstrated that array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) screening for IVF patients with good prognosis significantly improves clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates in fresh embryo transfer cycles. The current study further investigates the efficiency of applying aCGH in the selection of euploid embryos for cryopreservation as related to pregnancy and implantation outcomes in subsequent frozen embryo transfer (FET) cycles.First-time IVF patients with good prognosis undergoing fresh single embryo transfer and having at least one remaining blastocyst for cryopreservation were prospectively randomized into two groups: 1) Group A patients had embryos assessed by morphology first and then by aCGH screening of trophectoderm cells and 2) Group B patients had embryos evaluated by morphology alone. All patients had at least one blastocyst available for cryopreservation after fresh embryo transfer. There were 15 patients in Group A and 23 patients in Group B who failed to conceive after fresh embryo transfer and completed the FET cycles. Blastocyst survival and implantation rates were compared between the two groups.There were no significant differences in blastocyst survival rates between Group A and Group B (90.9% vs. 91.3%, respectively; p >0.05). However, a significantly higher implantation rate was observed in the morphology assessment plus aCGH screening group compared to the morphology assessment alone group (65.0% vs. 33.3%, respectively; p=0.038). There was no miscarriage observed in Group A while a 16.7% miscarriage rate was recorded in Group B (0% vs. 16.7%, respectively; p >0.05).While aCGH screening has been recently applied to select euploid blastocysts for fresh transfer in young, low-risk IVF patients, this is the first prospective study on the impact of aCGH specifically on blastocyst survival and implantation outcomes in the subsequent FET cycles of IVF patients with good prognosis. The present study demonstrates that aCGH screening of blastocysts prior to cryopreservation significantly improves implantation rates and may reduce the risk of miscarriage in subsequent FET cycles. Further randomized clinical studies with a larger sample size are needed to validate these preliminary findings.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Pacific Reproductive Center's live birth success rates are now exceeding the national average by fifteen percent. This includes success rates for women who are undergoing egg retrievals and IVF procedures. Call (310) 853-5793 for more information and scheduling. For over twenty years, Pacific Reproductive Center and Dr. Rifaat Salem have been compassionately helping women with infertility issues achieve their fertility goals. This includes comprehensive options for therapy, such as ovulation induction, ICSI, IVF, IUI and more. Over the years, PRC has been instrumental in pioneering state-of-the-art reproductive technologies. This includes preimplantation genetic testing, in-house IVF and ICSI as well. The success rate of 57% for those under 35 years old is exceptionally high compared to the national average, and has helped thousands of women achieve their fertility goals over the past two decades. PRC has four locations in the LA and OC metro areas including Glendale, Torrance, Irvine and Corona CA. Treatment is provided with Board Certified providers who are caring and work to individualize the treatments based on a patient's previous experiences. For those between the ages of 38-40, PRC still maintains success rates over ten percent higher than the national average. For top fertility treatment in Los Angeles and Orange County, visit http://pacificreproductivecenter.com and then call Pacific Reproductive Center at (310) 853-5793.

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