Time filter

Source Type

Conway D.P.,University of New South Wales | Conway D.P.,St George Hospital | Guy R.,University of New South Wales | Mcnulty A.,Sydney Hospital | And 30 more authors.
HIV Medicine | Year: 2015

Objectives: Rapid HIV testing (RHT) is well established in many countries, but it is new in Australia since a policy change in 2011. We assessed service provider acceptability of RHT before and after its implementation in four Sydney public sexual health clinics. Methods: Service providers were surveyed immediately after training in RHT and again 6-12 months later. Differences in mean scores between survey rounds were assessed via t-tests, with stratification by profession and the number of tests performed. Results: RHT was rated as highly acceptable among staff at baseline and acceptability scores improved between survey rounds. Belief in being sufficiently skilled and experienced to perform RHT (P=0.004) and confidence in the delivery of nonreactive results increased (P=0.007), while the belief that RHT was disruptive declined (P=0.001). Acceptability was higher for staff who had performed a greater number of tests regarding comfort with their role in RHT (P=0.004) and belief that patients were satisfied with RHT (P=0.007). Compared with nurses, doctors had a stronger preference for a faster rapid test (P=0.027) and were more likely to agree that RHT interfered with consultations (P=0.014). Conclusions: Differences in responses between professions may reflect differences in staff roles, the type of patients seen by staff and the model of testing used, all of which may affect the number of tests performed by staff. These findings may inform planning for how best to implement RHT in clinical services. © 2015 British HIV Association.


Conway D.P.,University of New South Wales | Conway D.P.,St George Hospital | Guy R.,University of New South Wales | Davies S.C.,Royal North Shore Hospital | And 33 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2015

Background: Rapid HIV testing (RHT) is well established in many countries, but it is new in Australia. We assessed the acceptability of RHT and its associations among gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (GBM) after implementation of RHT in Sydney sexual health clinics. Methods: GBM were invited to complete an acceptability questionnaire before and after provision of the result of finger-prick blood RHT, comparing their experience of RHT with conventional HIV testing (CHT) involving venipuncture. Logistic regression was used to assess associations between patient characteristics and the preference for RHT over CHT next time they tested for HIV. Results: Of 1061 GBM who received non-reactive RHT results, 59% found RHT less stressful than CHT and 34% reported no difference, and 61% found RHT more comfortable than CHT and 26% reported no difference. Nearly all men were satisfied with RHT result delivery (99%) and the RHT process overall (99%). Most men (79%) preferred RHT for their next HIV test and this preference was stronger in men who were aged 35-44 years (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.49, p<0.01), reported they would test more often if RHT was available (AOR 1.66, p=0.01), found returning for results annoying (AOR 1.67, p=0.01), and found RHT less stressful (AOR 2.37, p<0.01) and more comfortable (AOR 1.62, p=0.02) than CHT. Men concerned about the reliability of RHT were less than half as likely to prefer RHT for their next HIV test (AOR 0.44, p<0.01). Conclusions: Most GBM preferred RHT to CHT next time and this preference was associated with finding RHT more convenient, more comfortable and less stressful than CHT. These findings suggest that in a clinic setting RHT should be considered to improve the patient experience and may potentially increase uptake and frequency of HIV testing. © 2015 Conway et al.

Loading Pacific Laboratory Medicine Services PALMS collaborators
Loading Pacific Laboratory Medicine Services PALMS collaborators