San Francisco, CA, United States
San Francisco, CA, United States

The Pacific Gas and Electric Company, commonly known as PG&E, is an investor-owned utility that provides natural gas and electricity to most of the northern two-thirds of California, from Bakersfield almost to the Oregon border. It is the leading subsidiary of the PG&E Corporation.PG&E was founded in 1905 and is currently headquartered in the Pacific Gas & Electric Building in San Francisco. Wikipedia.


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News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.renewableenergyworld.com

San Francisco-based Pacific Gas and Electric Company on Monday said it will administer about $240 million under California’s self-generation incentive program to help customers install energy storage, renewables and other energy technologies.


FOLSOM, Calif. & EL CENTRO, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--As of April 3, 2017, ZGlobal Inc. Power Engineering and Energy Solutions (“ZGlobal”) has begun providing Silicon Valley Clean Energy (“SVCE”) with alternative energy services, resulting in the successful launch of SVCE’s Community Choice Aggregation (“CCA”) operations. ZGlobal provides SVCE 24/7 operation services enabling 100% Carbon Free Electricity. “We are very pleased to leverage our decades of experience to provide SVCE with value-added services at competitive prices,” stated Kevin Coffee, Vice President of Electric Operations at ZGlobal, and a veteran of Electric Operations at Pacific Gas and Electric (“PG&E”). SVCE is a Community Choice Energy (CCE) provider, whose purpose is to pool the electricity demand of its residents and businesses and buy carbon free power on their behalf outside of their local utility. SVCE is encouraging a type of competition that could result in additional utilization of renewable and carbon free energy sources at more competitive rates. “With partners such as ZGlobal, Silicon Valley Clean Energy customers will get the same reliable service they are used to, and 100% carbon-free electricity at competitive prices,” said Tom Habashi, CEO, SVCE. Silicon Valley Clean Energy is a community-owned agency servicing the majority of Santa Clara County communities by acquiring clean, 100% carbon-free electricity on behalf of residents and businesses. As a public agency, net revenues are returned to the community to keep rates low and promote clean energy programs. Member jurisdictions include Campbell, Cupertino, Gilroy, Los Altos, Los Altos Hills, Los Gatos, Monte Sereno, Morgan Hill, Mountain View, Saratoga, Sunnyvale and the unincorporated areas of Santa Clara County. SVCE is guided by a Board of Directors, which is comprised of a representative from the governing body of each member community. With Silicon Valley Clean Energy, residents and businesses in our communities will join thousands of Californians in choosing clean power at competitive rates. For more information please visit SVCleanEnergy.org. ZGlobal offers a wide range of services in the energy sector, including round-the-clock scheduling and operation services, in addition to reliability/compliance services for green energy such as solar, wind, energy storage, geothermal, and biomass facilities, CCAs and utilities throughout the western United States. ZGlobal manages over 12,600 GWh of energy annually and over 3,000 MW peak from California, Arizona, Nevada, and Utah with a transaction value exceeding $320 million. ZGlobal was formed in 2005 and is staffed by veterans from the California Independent System Operator (CAISO) as well as various western utilities. The group is led by Ziad Alaywan P.E., who served as the Manager of PG&E real time operations. As one of the first employees that led the rapid implementation and operation of the CAISO in 1998, Mr. Alaywan later became CAISO’s Managing Director of Grid and Market Operations. More information is available at www.zglobal.biz.


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.greentechmedia.com

Several mornings a week, I leave my home in sunny Oakland, board a Bay Area Rapid Transit train and shoot underwater to work at Greentech Media's San Francisco bureau. In time, that commute to write about clean energy will be powered by clean energy as well. The BART board of directors just passed an electrical portfolio policy that requires half of the organization's power to come from renewables by 2025, and 100 percent by 2045. That has broader implications for the region, because the electric train system consumes roughly 400,000 megawatt-hours annually -- equivalent to a small city like Alameda. And, due to a unique legislative carve-out, BART will procure this power itself. "We're doing this to advance clean energy, but we're also doing this because we think it is cost effective," said Sustainability Director Holly Gordon, who previously led legislative and regulatory affairs at Sunrun. "We feel as though we can purchase clean energy while maintaining low and stable costs for the district as well." BART already cuts area carbon emissions by lowering the number of single occupant automobiles sitting in traffic on the Bay Bridge each morning and evening. But the all-electric trains need considerable juice to run. The board's decision, then, models a key strategic pathway for jurisdictions worried about climate change: electrify crucial activities, like transportation, then decarbonize the electricity. There's a different model here, too: the transit agency as electric utility. This will be the first use of a 2015 California law that gave BART in particular the freedom to choose renewable power suppliers on the wholesale market. Before that, the district could procure preference power from a federal power marketing agency or buy from a municipal utility. Pacific Gas and Electric handles delivery, but BART has pulled together a power mix it says is 78 percent cleaner in terms of carbon emissions and 18 percent cheaper than what an equivalent customer gets from the utility. The new energy policy will put BART ahead of California's renewable portfolio standard, which mandates 50 percent renewable power by 2030. Legislators have considered expanding that to 100 percent by 2045. To achieve those targets, BART will release a PPA RFP next week. This is not a virtual PPA, Gordon noted -- companies will have to actually bid into the California transmission network. The agency is also building onsite solar generation with SolarCity: two 1-megawatt plants are under construction at different stations; a half-megawatt plant already exists. With an 80-megawatt peak, though, in-house generation will only serve a fraction of demand. This approach to sourcing power for transportation hearkens back to the earliest days of the grid, when trolley companies built and operated their own power plants specifically to run their vehicles. Incidentally, the first public electric grid opened up at Fourth and Market Streets in San Francisco, just a block from BART's Powell Street Station. BART appears to be the first electrified public transit system to commit to 100 percent renewable power. Nearby Caltrain pledged to use 100 percent renewable electricity, but its trains still run on diesel. As more cities buckle down on greenhouse gas commitments, the transit agency/renewables buyer could become a prominent class of commercial clean power customer.


News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: www.theenergycollective.com

As of 2016, the United States had 99 operating nuclear reactors at 61 plants across the country, with a capacity-weighted average age of 37 years. The oldest operating nuclear reactor in the United States was built in 1969. Watts Bar 2, which entered commercial service in 2016, was the first new reactor added since 1996. An additional four reactors are currently under construction. Operation of nuclear plants at high capacity factors enabled them to contribute nearly 20% of total U.S. electricity generation in 2016 while only making up 9% of U.S. generation capacity. Of the 99 gigawatts (GW) of total operating nuclear capacity in the country, 95 GW came online between 1970 and 1990. However, planned nuclear capacity additions began to slow as early as the late 1970s because of a number of factors, including slowing electric demand growth, high capital and construction costs, and public opposition. Costs, schedules, and public acceptance were all influenced by the accident at the Three Mile Island plant in 1979. From 1979 through 1988, 67 planned builds were canceled. However, because of the long times required for permitting and building new nuclear reactors, many plants that had begun the process in the 1970s continued to come online through the early 1990s. U.S. nuclear plants are licensed for an initial operating life of 40 years by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Owners of nuclear power plants can apply for a license renewal, extending license expiration by 20 years. The decision to apply for a renewal is based on the economics of the capital investments required to extend the operating lifetime and estimated future revenues. As of 2016, the NRC had granted license renewals to 84 of the 99 operating reactors in the United States. Nuclear capacity has decreased in the United States in recent years as plants have retired. The retirement of the Fort Calhoun Nuclear Generating Station in October 2016 marked the fifth nuclear retirement since 2013. Several other plants have announced plans to retire in the near future (including Oyster Creek, Pilgrim, Palisades Unit 1, and Indian Point Units 2 and 3) totaling more than 4 GW of capacity. In addition, Pacific Gas and Electric announced that it will not seek license extensions for its Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant, meaning Diablo Canyon Units 2 and 3, with a combined capacity of more than 2 GW, will be retired by the time their current licenses expire in 2024 and 2025, respectively. Nuclear capacity can increase either by building new reactors or by instituting changes that allow existing plants to increase their generating capacity, known as uprates. Four new reactors are under construction and are expected to bring more than 4 GW of capacity online. Uprates of existing plants require NRC approval, and almost all U.S. reactors have applied and received at least one uprate. Through 2016, these uprates have contributed more than 7 GW to total U.S. nuclear capacity. Nuclear plants have higher capacity factors than any other electricity generating technology, averaging 90% over the past five years. Because nuclear plants run near full capacity for much of the time they are operating, they serve as baseload generation. Refueling and maintenance outages at nuclear plants are typically scheduled during the spring and fall periods of lower electricity demand. Nuclear plants typically refuel every 18 to 24 months, and over the past few years these outages have typically lasted about six weeks. Thirty states have at least one operating nuclear reactor. Illinois (6 plants with 11 total reactors) and Pennsylvania (5 plants with 9 reactors) have the most nuclear capacity in the country, and together they account for one-fifth of total U.S. nuclear capacity. This article is part of an ongoing series of Today in Energy articles examining the fleet of utility-scale power plants in the United States. Previous articles have examined hydroelectric, coal, and natural gas generators.


Patent
Pacific Gas and Electric Company | Date: 2014-03-12

Some embodiments include a method of providing substantially uninterrupted gas service by coupling at least one gas cylinder to a portable tanking assembly. The tanking assembly can include a cart including a rear frame and a coupled carrier frame supported on an axle with wheels. In some embodiments, the carrier frame can include a caged regulation assembly housing at least a portion of a regulation apparatus with an upstream supply end coupled to a downstream delivery end. In some embodiments, the regulation apparatus includes a primary regulator coupled a one relief valve. The relief valve can be coupled to a downstream regulator, coupled to a water column gauge. In some embodiments, the regulation apparatus further includes a delivery valve. In some embodiments, the delivery valve comprises a distribution manifold assembly including a manifold and a plurality of distribution couplers coupled to the manifold.


Patent
Pacific Gas and Electric Company | Date: 2016-04-18

Embodiments of the invention include a gas training system with a computing device or server coupled to a mapping component and a virtual leak detector. The virtual leak detector is configured to communicate at least one location or GPS position data. A trainee device or good is coupled with the virtual leak detector discoverable by the computing device or server. A coupled non-transitory computer readable medium can cause the computing device or server to retrieve a map and/or image from the mapping component representing an actual training area or location. Further, based at least in part on the location or GPS position data received from the virtual leak detector, the map or map image is displayed with a representation of the trainee device or good positioned based at least in part on the actual physical location of the at least one trainee device or good.


Patent
Pacific Gas and Electric Company | Date: 2014-03-14

Some embodiments provide systems and methods of managing enterprise resources including providing a plurality of process modules for managing resources associated with a plurality of processes, at least one of the modules using at least one processor to access a database stored on a non-transitory computer-readable storage medium. Some embodiments include providing a project and asset management module for managing at least one step of a plurality of projects including long-term planning and defining at least one project work item in a project life cycle. Some embodiments also include a resource and scheduling module for maintaining a resource database stored on a non-transitory computer-readable storage medium and for scheduling project resources. Some embodiments include a planning and reporting module, an engineering design module, and an interface module that uses at least one of the processors to interface at least two of the plurality of modules.


Patent
Pacific Gas and Electric Company | Date: 2013-03-13

A computer implemented method for managing risk, which can include determining an organizational impact score from an aggregate of scenario impact scores and storing the organizational impact score in a memory of the computer. Some embodiments include calculating a likelihood score based upon an analysis of threats, imminence of each threat, and a likelihood associated with each threat, and storing the likelihood score in a memory of the computer. In some embodiments, an organizational maturity score is determined based on the ability of the organization to mitigate the actions of a potential threat and recover from a given scenario, and the organizational maturity score is stored in a memory of the computer. Some embodiments include calculating a Risk Index using a processor of the computer wherein the Risk Index equals the impact score multiplied by the likelihood score and divided by the maturity score.


Patent
Pacific Gas and Electric Company | Date: 2013-11-05

Some embodiments include a computer-implemented restoration work plan system and method comprising a processor, a non-transitory computer-readable storage medium in data communication with the processor, and a service restoration management system executable by the processor, and configured to prepare a first distribution system operations storm outage prediction project model forecast substantially in real time based at least in part on a weather forecast. Some embodiments include calculating and displaying an expected outage category level substantially in real time for each division based on the weather forecast, and resource numbers comprising the number of personnel needed to respond to outages and the number of crew needed to repair outages. Some embodiments include calculating and displaying an estimated time of repair within the repair plan based at least in part on a historical productivity assumption, the productivity assumption including a historical rate of assessment and repair and percentage of outages requiring repair.


Patent
Pacific Gas and Electric Company | Date: 2013-06-18

Embodiments of the invention provide a pipeline analysis system for analyzing a pipeline dataset to determine compliance with desired maximum allowable pipeline operating pressures. In some embodiments, pipeline component data can correspond to an existing or planned physical pipeline. In some embodiments, the pipeline analysis system can enable revision of the pipeline component data to specify at least one pipeline component having at least one different characteristic than was originally specified in the dataset or specify pipeline components that are in compliance with desired maximum allowable pipeline operating pressures. In some embodiments, the pipeline analysis system comprises a processor, and at least one non-transitory computer-readable storage medium for tangibly storing thereon program logic for execution by the processor. In some embodiments, the program logic comprises logic executed by the processor for receiving and tangibly storing pipeline component data corresponding to an existing or planned physical pipeline.

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